2020 applicants
Undergraduate Course

Integrated Master in History: History

Now In Clearing
Integrated Master in History: History

Overview

The details
History
V199
October 2020
Full-time
4 years
Colchester Campus
History

At Essex we’re about social conscience, wondering why, and understanding the bigger picture. We teach you to find your own critical voice and view history through the eyes of different people, telling hidden histories that might otherwise be forgotten.

This degree allows you to explore challenging questions about the impact of political, social and cultural change on individuals, social groups and regions. From African-American slavery to Stalin’s Russia—from households in Essex to witchcraft in Germany—from the history of disease to revolutions in China, we urge you to explore the past in order to better understand the present.

On the four-year MHist Version of this course (five years if taking a year abroad or placement year), you develop the same key skills for History as on the BA, as well as investigating more advanced topics by achieving a masters-level qualification. You’ll have the flexibility to choose from a wide range of optional modules across different topics and areas of specialism, for example:

  • The role of women in Early Modern England
  • Witchcraft and witch-hunts between the 15th and 18th centuries
  • Multiculturalism in Modern Britain
  • China and its relations with the outside world
  • Apartheid in South Africa

In addition to the following advanced masters level topics, such as:

  • Public history
  • Cultural and social approaches to history
  • Food in history
  • War and medicine
  • Conflict and remembrance

You are taught by award-winning academics from all over the world: our corridors are truly cosmopolitan. Our students love us too – 92% of our History students expressed overall satisfaction with their course (NSS 2020).

Why we're great.
  • Achieve a masters level qualification with this four-year course variant.
  • You can choose from a unique and diverse range of topics, periods and countries.
  • 92% of our History students expressed overall satisfaction with their course (NSS 2020).
THE Awards 2018 - Winner University of the Year

Study abroad

Your education extends beyond the university campus. We support you in expanding your education through offering the opportunity to spend a year or a term studying abroad at one of our partner universities. The four-year version of our degree allows you to spend the third year abroad or employed on a placement abroad, while otherwise remaining identical to the three-year course.

Studying abroad allows you to experience other cultures and languages, to broaden your degree socially and academically, and to demonstrate to employers that you are mature, adaptable, and organised.

If you spend a full year abroad you'll only pay 15% of your usual tuition fee to Essex for that year. You won't pay any tuition fees to your host university.

Placement year

When you arrive at Essex, you can decide whether you would like to combine your course with a placement year. You will be responsible for finding your placement, but with support and guidance provided by both your department and our Employability and Careers Centre.

If you complete a placement year you'll only pay 20% of your usual tuition fee to Essex for that year.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. We welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Our teaching and research concentrates on the period from 1500 to the present and covers a wide geographical area that includes British and European history, as well as Latin America, the USA, China, Russia and Africa.

Specialist facilities

  • We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
  • Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in nineteenth and twentieth-century economic and social history
  • Attend an exciting programme of events
  • Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Your future

A history degree opens the doors to many employment opportunities. In addition to the opportunity to learn about the past and come to a better understanding of the present, a course in history also provides you with important skills that will be of value after leaving university. You learn to absorb, analyse and assess a wide variety of information and viewpoints, to express your arguments in oral and written form, and to think and work both independently and in co-operation with others.

Our graduates have gone on to have careers in a wide variety of fields including teaching, the Civil Service, Law enforcement, charity administration, librarianship and much more.

Some of our recent graduates have found employment as:

  • a warden for the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle
  • a planning support officer for a local council
  • a senior underwriting assistant at CNA Insurance Company Limited
  • a researcher at the House of Commons
  • a graduate trainee for the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew
  • a library assistant for the University of Cambridge

We also work with the university's Student Development Team to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Entry requirements

Clearing entry requirements

Specific entry requirements for this course in Clearing are not published here but for most of our degree courses you will need to hold a Level 3 qualification. If you are interested in applying and have already received your results, use our Clearing application form to apply for 2020 entry and find out if you are eligible. You will be asked to provide details of your qualifications and grades.

Structure

Example structure

We offer a flexible course structure with a mixture of compulsory and optional modules chosen from lists. Below is just one example structure from the current academic year of a combination of modules you could take. Your course structure could differ based on the modules you choose.

Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore all modules listed are subject to change. To view the compulsory modules and full list of optional modules currently on offer, please view the programme specification via the link below.

Becoming a Historian

Gain the necessary tools with which to study history at university level. You will be introduced to history as an academic discipline and will develop the skills employed by professional historians, as well as gaining key transferable skills. This module has no single geographical focus, but uses examples from a range of different historical themes, time periods and countries.

View Becoming a Historian on our Module Directory

Europe Transformed: 1450-1750

This is the early modern period, a span of around 300 years often regarded by historians as a time of change and a watershed between the medieval and modern worlds. Gain an understanding of this important time by looking at Europe in economic, social, cultural and political contexts. Study the patterns of continuity and change which shaped this period, and reflect on the extent to which the Europe we live in today has been conditioned by these 300 years.

View Europe Transformed: 1450-1750 on our Module Directory

Multicultural Britain: A History (optional)

Britain is a diverse, multicultural society. Yet traditional histories of Britain often ignore the fact that British society has been remade and its culture enriched by people from a wide variety of different cultures, communities and backgrounds. This module will examine how 'race' became a defining concept for understanding British society, how mass immigration transformed the concept of Britishness, and how Black, Asian and other Ethnic Minorities had to fight in order to exercise their rights as British citizens. It will also examine the history of Europeans in Britain from Jewish immigration in the 1900s through to debates on the EU and Brexit.

View Multicultural Britain: A History (optional) on our Module Directory

Pain: A Short History (optional)

Recent scholarship in several disciplines has grappled with the question of how cultural perceptions affect bodily experience. Using an interdisciplinary framework, we will explore the meanings and experience of pain in Europe, particularly in England and France during the long eighteenth century. The course starts and finishes by considering the extent to which a mind and body split occurred during this period.

View Pain: A Short History (optional) on our Module Directory

Modern Revolutions in Science, Politics, and Culture (optional)

Certain ideas shape the way we see ourselves and the world around us - ideas like democracy, free speech, individualism, free markets, and human rights. These ideas took their definitive modern form during a politically and intellectually revolutionary stretch of history known as the Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1800). This interdisciplinary module examines this period and thus serves as an essential prerequisite for students who want to understand the intellectual currents that run through the world they live in. Graduating students often rank it among the most useful modules they have taken.

View Modern Revolutions in Science, Politics, and Culture (optional) on our Module Directory

Navigating the Digital World (optional)

What does it mean to be a "digital citizen"? How are digital technologies transforming society? To what extent do digital technologies curb or enhance our rights? Some say that we live in a "post-truth" era filled with "fake news" that traps us in a digital "bubble" or "echo chamber". Others see digital technologies as the key to unlocking social change and finding new ways to bring people together across geographical boundaries. Which view is right? What are the actual legal, ethical, social, political, creative, and economic implications of living in an increasingly digital world? This module gives you an opportunity to explore these important issues, and it also provides you with hands-on training from experts in the practical skills required to navigate the digital world.

View Navigating the Digital World (optional) on our Module Directory

Approaches to History

This module will illuminate everything you study in history. It encourages you to think about the many and diverse ways in which historians approach the writing of history. You’ll be introduced to important historical concepts that have shaped recent historical writing, such as microhistory, class, gender and race, or to an important historical theme, such as consumption, literary history and global history.

View Approaches to History on our Module Directory

Choosing Your Past: How to Design and Manage a Research Project

Building on the skills that you have gained in your first year of study on (HR101: Becoming a Historian), this module helps you to prepare for successful completion of your Research Project (HR831) in your final year. The module explains the purpose of the Project, and provides a sense of how researchers develop research projects, from methodology and literature reviews to thinking about language, using primary sources and archives, and managing time and planning effectively.

View Choosing Your Past: How to Design and Manage a Research Project on our Module Directory

Gender in Early Modern England (optional)

You will look at the roles of women and men in early modern England between 1550 and 1750. In this period men were to rule and women were to be obedient to them. But the reality was often very different to this. The practical realities of economic life and the disruptions of Civil War and Reformation meant relations between women and men varied and adapted in a period of great cultural, political, economic, social, and religious change.

View Gender in Early Modern England (optional) on our Module Directory

China: The Long Twentieth Century (optional)

This module is a gateway to introduce you to an interdisciplinary approach to China and Chinese history, and you’ll examine significant and complex issues in its modern history. We examine materials that deal with the historical, political, social, and artistic aspects of famous sites and phenomenon, such as Tiananmen Square, the Great Wall and the Yellow River, in order to understand modern China at its politico-cultural core, in its relations with the outside world, its symbolic function in the new global order, as well as its path to modernisation.

View China: The Long Twentieth Century (optional) on our Module Directory

History in Schools (optional)

Are you considering a career in teaching? Would you like to get a taster of the teacher training process? This module will give you valuable advice as well as hands-on experience which will enhance your application and provide you with a chance to get involved in history teaching activities in local schools. You will also get a chance to chat with people who have undertaken teacher training, which will give you an insider’s viewpoint. You will get the chance to observe experienced teachers, participate in lessons as an assistant, and finally deliver a session of your own. You’ll also get the chance to explore the range of careers you can pursue with a teacher training qualification, including adult learning, community learning and engagement, or teaching in non-traditional environments.

View History in Schools (optional) on our Module Directory

Supernatural and Natural Worlds in Early Modern Europe (optional)

In this module you’ll explore the shifting meanings of the natural and supernatural worlds during a period that encompassed three major shifts in intellectual outlook during the early modern period in Europe: the Reformation, Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. You’ll look at the way in which early modern people understood the boundaries between human and animal, body and soul, life and death, science and religion, and reality and imagination.

View Supernatural and Natural Worlds in Early Modern Europe (optional) on our Module Directory

From Welfare State to Brexit: Politics, Democracy, and the People in Britain, 1945-2020 (optional)
Self, Society and Stigma: Psychological Health in Twentieth-Century Britain (optional)
Research Project

History is actively constructed and not simply rediscovered in the records of the past. Historical research involves a process of selection and interpretation, and there is an active exchange between theory and empirical data. The Research Project gives you a unique opportunity to explore the making of history. You undertake a piece of detailed, critical and/or possibly original historical research. Meetings and workshops provide practical guidance on formulating a topic, researching, writing and presentation.

View Research Project on our Module Directory

Britain’s Second World War: Mass Observation, Myth and Memory (optional)
War and Society in South Africa and Britain: the great colonial war and its impact (optional)
Crime and Punishment: England in Comparative Perspective 1650-1900 (optional)

In this module you study the history of English criminal justice, and to a lesser extent that of France and Germany as well. Gain an insight into the evolution of prosecuting, the function of criminal courts, the differences social status and gender made, and the changing practices in policing, prosecuting, trying, pardoning and punishing. Throughout the module you will be concerned with questions of historical causation, and with the political and ideological contexts of criminal justice.

View Crime and Punishment: England in Comparative Perspective 1650-1900 (optional) on our Module Directory

Research Methods in History

This module provides you with a rigorous and practical preparation for undertaking historical research in Britain in the period since the 16th century. You will understand the structures of archival and library provision in the UK, have acquired practical skills of project management, and familiarised yourself with some of the key institutions and sources you will need to use in research. There will also be a visit to the Essex Record Office, UK Data Archive and Albert Sloman Library Special Collections.

View Research Methods in History on our Module Directory

Approaches to Cultural and Social History (optional)

This module focuses on the theoretical and methodological implications of the 'cultural turn'. You’ll be introduced to key concepts, and will explore debates about the meanings of terms such as 'subjectivity', 'identities' and 'discourse'. You will also explore the possibilities opened by cultural approaches, as reflected in new and emerging debates and themes such as childhood, public and private, sex, the psyche, and memory.

View Approaches to Cultural and Social History (optional) on our Module Directory

A Global History of Food, c.1400 - c.1750 (optional)

Food is the bread and butter of human civilisation – except, both bread and butter are culturally specific. So let's broaden our minds. The traditions of what is considered edible, how it is produced, prepared and consumed are central to the definition to each society's culture. You’ll investigate the cultural and social history of food, centring on the changes created by the encounters between the Americas and Europe from the late 15th to the 17th century.

View A Global History of Food, c.1400 - c.1750 (optional) on our Module Directory

Gender in Early Modern Europe c.1500- c.1800 (optional)

You’ll examine the ways in which gender divisions were constructed, experienced, affirmed and challenged, and the ways in which gender relations were played out and regulated in Europe c.1450-c.1750. You’ll look at key phenomena of the early modern period, such as the Reformation and religious change, and the hunting of witches, and analyse how they affected gender and gender relations and the extent to which men and women experienced them differently.

View Gender in Early Modern Europe c.1500- c.1800 (optional) on our Module Directory

Fees and funding

Home/EU fee

£9,250

International fee

£16,050

Fees will increase for each academic year of study.

Home and EU fee information

International fee information

What's next

Open Days

Our events are a great way to find out more about studying at Essex. We run a number of Open Days throughout the year which enable you to discover what our campus has to offer. You have the chance to:

  • tour our campus and accommodation
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  • meet our students and staff

Check out our Visit Us pages to find out more information about booking onto one of our events. And if the dates aren’t suitable for you, feel free to book a campus tour here.

How to apply during Clearing

Once you’ve checked that we have the right course for you, applying couldn’t be simpler. Fill in our quick and easy Clearing application form with as much detail as you can. We’ll then take a look and get back to you with a decision. There’s no need to call us to apply; just do it all online.

Find out more about Clearing

Interviews

We don’t interview all applicants during Clearing, however, we will only make offers for the following course after a successful interview:

  • BA Multimedia Journalism
  • BSc Nursing (Adult)
  • BSc Nursing (Mental Health)
  • BA Social Work

The interview allows our academics to find out more about you, and in turn you’ll be able to ask us any questions you might have. Further details will be emailed to you if you are shortlisted for interview.


Apply now
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