Undergraduate Course

BA Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies

(Including Foundation Year)

Now In Clearing
BA Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies

Overview

The details
Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies (Including Foundation Year)
C89C
October 2021
Full-time
4 years
Colchester Campus
Essex Pathways

Our four-year BA Psychoanalytic Studies (including foundation year), will be suitable for you if your academic qualifications do not yet meet our entrance requirements for the three-year version of this course and you want a programme that increases your subject knowledge as well as improves your academic skills in order to support your academic performance.

This four-year course includes a foundation year (Year Zero), followed by a further three years of study. During your Year Zero, you study three academic subjects relevant to your chosen course as well as a compulsory academic skills module, with additional English language for non-English speakers.

You are an Essex student from day one, a member of our global community based at the most internationally diverse campus university in the UK.

After successful completion of Year Zero in our Essex Pathways Department, you progress to complete your course with our Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies.

From year one you will continue developing your academic skills alongside discovering the different schools of psychoanalysis and explore its applications to different settings and objects of study - from individual clinical work, to groups, culture and society. At its core, psychoanalysis believes that understanding human experience is not just about looking at external factors, from the places we live and work to the people we talk to, but also at internal ones - our inner motivations, fantasies, and defence mechanisms, to name a few.

Beginning with an introduction to psychodynamic concepts as applied to individuals, relationships and organisations, the course goes on to provide a comprehensive account of child and adult development and critical overviews of both Freudian and Jungian psychology. From this foundation, psychodynamic approaches are then applied thematically to diverse areas including:

  • The psychological factors that influence our emotions, behaviours and relationships
  • The forces that drive human behaviour and interaction
  • Literature and film
  • War and trauma
  • Sexuality

If you cannot see this video, you can watch it on our Vimeo channel within your browser.

Our Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies is internationally recognised as one of the leading departments for work on the role of the unconscious mind in mental health, as well as in culture and society more generally. We are top 10 in the UK for research (REF 2014), and consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores.

Why we're great.
  • 91% of our students from the Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies expressed overall satisfaction with their course (NSS 2020).
  • You’ll be taught by lecturers who bring both academic and practical knowledge from years of working with children.
  • Our students learn in small groups with expert practitioners and academics.
THE Awards 2018 - Winner University of the Year

Our expert staff

We have some of the best teachers across the University in our Essex Pathways Department, all of whom have strong subject backgrounds and are highly skilled in their areas.

Our Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies is internationally recognised as one of the leading departments for work that focuses on the role of the unconscious mind in mental health, as well as in culture and society generally. Our teaching is deeply grounded in knowledge deriving from clinical practice, to which our highest standards of academic thinking are then applied.

Our staff blends clinical experience and expertise in their field with the academic rigour for which the Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies has such a reputation. You will be taught by lecturers who have years of experience, both in working directly with troubled individuals and groups and delivering lectures and seminars on specialist topics.

This gives you the opportunity to work with and be taught by senior clinicians and world-class scholars in their fields. From year one, this course is led by Julie Walsh, whose current research projects include Face-Work; investigating the changing role of the face in therapeutic encounter, and Not Mother; a creative-critical writing project that explores what the figure of 'not-mother' may have to offer a world that seems in such dire need of mothering.

Our staff specialise in areas ranging from psychoanalysis and neuroscience, to practical therapies and anxiety in criminal psychopaths, to oral history interviewing. More information on their research is available on our staff pages.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our Essex Pathways Department for your foundation year, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer, as well as those provided by our Academy to support you:

  • We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
  • Our Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
  • Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

Our Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies provides excellent on-campus facilities:

  • You will have access to the Albert Sloman Library, which houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives
  • The Department has its own dedicated library of specialist texts which inform and influence our research
  • Free evening Open Seminars on topics relevant to psychoanalysis which are open to students, staff and members of the public.

Your future

In undertaking this course you’ll study a range of psychoanalytic concepts - applying them to individuals, relationships and organisations, which will provide you with a unique perspective of why we are the way we are, on understanding others and knowing how to relate to them, which will make you suited for further clinical training, postgraduate study in different fields, or employment.

Key areas of employment for people with these skills include marketing, advertising, human resources, management, the media, care work, teaching or health care. Our future graduates may go to work in a wide range of careers, including:

  • Therapeutic services
  • NHS Mental Health work
  • Psychoanalytic therapy
  • Education
  • Social Care
  • Therapeutic Consultancy
  • Management Consultancy
  • Marketing and Public Relations
  • Academia

We also work with the University’s Student Development Team to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

* Non-specialist higher education institutions with a survey population of at least 500.

Entry requirements

Clearing entry requirements

Specific entry requirements for this course in Clearing are not published here but for most of our degree courses you will need to hold a Level 3 qualification. If you are interested in applying and have already received your results, use our Clearing application form to apply for 2021 entry and find out if you are eligible. You will be asked to provide details of your qualifications and grades.

English language requirements

English language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English: IELTS 5.5 overall. Specified component grades are also required for applicants who require a Student visa to study in the UK.

Other English language qualifications may be acceptable so please contact us for further details. If we accept the English component of an international qualification then it will be included in the information given about the academic levels required. Please note that date restrictions may apply to some English language qualifications

If you are an international student requiring a Student visa to study in the UK please see our immigration webpages for the latest Home Office guidance on English language qualifications.

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

Our Year 0 courses are only open to UK and EU applicants. If you’re an international student, but do not meet the English language or academic requirements for direct admission to your chosen degree, you could prepare and gain entry through a pathway course. Find out more about opportunities available to you at the University of Essex International College.

Structure

Course structure

We offer a flexible course structure with a mixture of core/compulsory modules, and optional modules chosen from lists.

Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field. The course content is therefore reviewed on an annual basis to ensure our courses remain up-to-date so modules listed are subject to change.

Teaching and learning disclaimer

Following the impact of the pandemic, we made changes to our teaching and assessment to ensure our current students could continue with their studies uninterrupted and safely. These changes included courses being taught through blended delivery, normally including some face-to-face teaching, online provision, or a combination of both across the year.

The teaching and assessment methods listed show what is currently planned for 2021 entry; changes may be necessary if, by the beginning of this course, we need to adapt the way we’re delivering them due to the external environment, and to allow you to continue to receive the best education possible safely and seamlessly.

Components and modules explained

Components

Components are the blocks of study that make up your course. A component may have a set module which you must study, or a number of modules from which you can choose.

Each component has a status and carries a certain number of credits towards your qualification.

Status What this means
Core
You must take the set module for this component and you must pass. No failure can be permitted.
Core with Options
You can choose which module to study from the available options for this component but you must pass. No failure can be permitted.
Compulsory
You must take the set module for this component. There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the qualification if you fail.
Compulsory with Options
You can choose which module to study from the available options for this component. There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the qualification if you fail.
Optional
You can choose which module to study from the available options for this component. There may be limited opportunities to continue on the course/be eligible for the qualification if you fail.

The modules that are available for you to choose for each component will depend on several factors, including which modules you have chosen for other components, which modules you have completed in previous years of your course, and which term the module is taught in.

Modules

Modules are the individual units of study for your course. Each module has its own set of learning outcomes and assessment criteria and also carries a certain number of credits.

In most cases you will study one module per component, but in some cases you may need to study more than one module. For example, a 30-credit component may comprise of either one 30-credit module, or two 15-credit modules, depending on the options available.

Modules may be taught at different times of the year and by a different department or school to the one your course is primarily based in. You can find this information from the module code. For example, the module code HR100-4-FY means:

HR 100  4  FY

The department or school the module will be taught by.

In this example, the module would be taught by the Department of History.

The module number. 

The UK academic level of the module.

A standard undergraduate course will comprise of level 4, 5 and 6 modules - increasing as you progress through the course.

A standard postgraduate taught course will comprise of level 7 modules.

A postgraduate research degree is a level 8 qualification.

The term the module will be taught in.

  • AU: Autumn term
  • SP: Spring term
  • SU: Summer term
  • FY: Full year 
  • AP: Autumn and Spring terms
  • PS: Spring and Summer terms
  • AS: Autumn and Summer terms

COMPONENT 01: CORE

The Unconscious in Individuals, Groups and Society
(30 CREDITS)

COMPONENT 02: CORE

Research and Academic Development Skills
(30 CREDITS)

This blended-learning module is designed to support students in their academic subject disciplines and to strengthen their confidence in key skills areas such as: academic writing, research, academic integrity, collaborative and reflective practices. The students are supported through the use of subject-specific materials tailored to their chosen degrees with alignment of assessments between academic subject modules and the skills module.

View Research and Academic Development Skills on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 03: CORE WITH OPTIONS

IA111-3-FY or IA118-3-FY or IA158-3-FY or IA121-3-FY
(30 CREDITS)

COMPONENT 04: CORE WITH OPTIONS

IA111-3-FY or IA118-3-FY or IA158-3-FY or IA121-3-FY
(30 CREDITS)

COMPONENT 01: COMPULSORY

Understanding Individuals Groups and Organisations : An Introduction to Psychodynamic Concepts
(15 CREDITS)

How do unconscious dynamics work in individuals, groups and organisations? How can psychodynamic insight be applied to this? Explore how individuals affect one another, how institutions affect those who work there and vice versa. Understand key concepts in psychodynamic thinking and how to apply this to individuals, groups and workplaces.

View Understanding Individuals Groups and Organisations : An Introduction to Psychodynamic Concepts on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 02: COMPULSORY

Child, Adolescent and Adult Development
(15 CREDITS)

How are foundations of emotional development laid down in early life? What impact do early experiences have on future social and learning? Study personality development from a psychodynamic and attachment perspective. Examine key development stages to see how work with clients requires understanding of the initial roots of their difficulties.

View Child, Adolescent and Adult Development on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 03: CORE

Freud: Mind, Culture and Society
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Freud’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

View Freud: Mind, Culture and Society on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 04: CORE

The Unconscious: Analytical Psychology, Culture and Society - Jung
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Jung’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

View The Unconscious: Analytical Psychology, Culture and Society - Jung on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 05: COMPULSORY

Popular Film, Literature and Television: A Psychoanalytic Approach (Freud and Jung)
(15 CREDITS)

How can we use psychoanalytic theory to understand film, literature and television? What is culture and can it contribute to our understanding of psychoanalysis itself? Examine work by Freud and Jung, as well as more contemporary perspectives, through the lens popular culture.

View Popular Film, Literature and Television: A Psychoanalytic Approach (Freud and Jung) on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 06: COMPULSORY

Assignment and Research Writing for Psychoanalytic Studies
(15 CREDITS)

Want guidance in understanding your course? Know how your academic skills will transfer to the world of work? Develop your abilities to undertake independent research. Learn to read critically and to write clearly. Build the employability skills that will help you during your studies and after graduation.

View Assignment and Research Writing for Psychoanalytic Studies on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 07: CORE

The Psychosocial Imagination
(30 CREDITS)

This introductory, two-term module foregrounds the ‘psychosocial’ in the BA in Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies. Whilst deeply rooted in a range of theoretical ideas, the module will be selective in its treatment of the psychosocial, and illustrative of further areas of study to come at later points in the degree. The module’s main point of emphasis will be on ‘imagination’, in a dual sense. Both how we might imagine the ‘psychosocial’ as a discipline, with its specific forms of knowledge, theoretical frames and domains of application, but also in the sense that psychosocial studies might give weight to forms of imagination and representation in their capacity to link subjective and embodied existence with social life.

View The Psychosocial Imagination on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 01: CORE

Psychoanalytic Theory: Freud and Object Relations
(15 CREDITS)

Following your first year modules, this module will build on Freudian theory and introduce more advanced topics. You will explore the work of Melanie Klein and the British Object Relations School of psychoanalysis and learn how they have used and interpreted Freudian concepts.

View Psychoanalytic Theory: Freud and Object Relations on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 02: CORE

Advanced Jungian and Post-Jungian Approaches
(15 CREDITS)

This module builds on analytical psychology and develops your insight into Jungian theory. You explore how Post Jungians have applied Jung’s theories and ideas to various topics such as gender, art, literature, religion and politics.

View Advanced Jungian and Post-Jungian Approaches on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 03: COMPULSORY

Psychoanalysis and the Child
(15 CREDITS)

In this module we examine some of the developments in psychoanalytic theory with a special focus on the figure of the child. We consider some of the debates surrounding the development of psychoanalysis of children through the work of Melanie Klein, D. W. Winnicott, Anna Freud, amongst others. We pay attention to the importance of play and practices of observation to understand how and why the figure of the child has been central to the development of psychoanalytic thought.

View Psychoanalysis and the Child on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 04: COMPULSORY

Trauma and Recovery: A Psychodynamic Approach
(15 CREDITS)

What place does trauma have within psychoanalytic thinking? What impact does loss have on children? Or on adolescents and adults? Explore human development and organisational dynamics by studying themes of child abuse, deprivation, loss and trauma. Understand the implications for organisations working with traumatised people.

View Trauma and Recovery: A Psychodynamic Approach on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 05: COMPULSORY

Lacanian psychoanalysis
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the work of French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan. Lacan made links between psychoanalysis and linguistics, anthropology, literature and philosophy. What we consider to be our most intimate features, such as self-image, desire and phantasy, are in fact constituted by something outside and beyond ourselves – the ‘symbolic’ law of language and society. You will learn about Lacan’s theory of the ‘mirror phase’, our constitution through others, and the importance of being a speaking being.

View Lacanian psychoanalysis on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 06: COMPULSORY

Wild Things: Literature, Childhood, Psychoanalysis
(15 CREDITS)

This module explored a wide range of children’s fiction, both written for children and about children. You read and analyse popular children’s literature from ‘Where the Wild Things are’ to ‘Matilda’. You will build your knowledge of how the perceptions of childhood have changed over the last century and the types of ideals being projected onto the world of children through literature.

View Wild Things: Literature, Childhood, Psychoanalysis on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 07: COMPULSORY

Preparing for my Future
(15 CREDITS)

This module prepares you for the next step after graduation. You develop an understanding of the possible careers and opportunities available to you within the field of psychoanalytic studies. You will have the opportunity to participate in a series of workshops alongside professionals in a variety of areas to gain hands on experience and a unique insight into work within psychoanalytic studies.

View Preparing for my Future on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 08: OPTIONAL

Option from list or outside option
(15 CREDITS)

COMPONENT 01: CORE

Dissertation
(30 CREDITS)

Throughout the year you’ll pursue a research project based on a subject of your choice. This can be either theoretical or empirical, involving interviews or observations. There will be an introductory seminar to help you choose your project, followed by a proposal presentation, and two or three meetings with a member of staff who will monitor progress and offer support. You’ll draw on the theory you’ve gained from three years of the course, and will produce a 2,000-word proposal and a 7,500-word dissertation.

View Dissertation on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 02: COMPULSORY

Current Debates in Psychosocial Studies
(30 CREDITS)

Members of staff from the Department of Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Studies will use aspects of their research to open up debates in depth psychology and psychosocial studies. These may touch on issues of continuing importance for the contemporary discipline, or newly emerging questions. The content will vary from year to year so as to remain innovative and attuned to what is most recent in the field, but may include topics such as gender and intimacy, clinical cases, racism and neuro-psychoanalysis.

View Current Debates in Psychosocial Studies on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 03: COMPULSORY

Therapeutic Practice
(15 CREDITS)

This module gives you an introduction to how depth psychological approaches are applied in contemporary psychotherapeutic work. It will help you understand the wide range of different applications – not only in theoretical orientation but also in the intensity of treatment, length of treatment and client age-group, in group, family and couple work as well as individual work, and in non-clinical settings. It will give you a sense of the psychotherapeutic landscape and the prospects for applying the learning from the degree in future. It will also give further insight into the psychotherapeutic process

View Therapeutic Practice on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 04: COMPULSORY

Reflective Practice
(15 CREDITS)

This module allows you to develop your reflective awareness and learn how to use psychodynamic understanding in relation to yourself as well as to the different aspects of the worlds you inhabit. You will develop an appreciation of unconscious and emotional communication in everyday life, and be able to engage critically and reflectively with contemporary topics. You will contribute actively to the design of the module, identifying with your peers areas of interest for psychoanalytic reflection. Reflective practice is represented by the following components: participating in Reflective Groups, maintaining a Reflective Journal and writing an end of year Reflective Report.

View Reflective Practice on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 05: COMPULSORY

Organisational Dynamics - Theory
(15 CREDITS)

What happens when people get together and work in groups? This module aims to help you understand the conscious and unconscious dynamics at work in organisations and the effect that this can have as a result. You will a deeper understanding of organisational dynamics and a greater capacity for psychodynamic observation, enabling you to apply psychodynamic insight to a wide range of settings.

View Organisational Dynamics - Theory on our Module Directory

COMPONENT 06: OPTIONAL

Option from list or outside option
(15 CREDITS)

Teaching

  • Teaching takes place in relatively small seminars and fora, with a focus on group discussion
  • Discussion in seminars includes both discussing other peoples’ work and discussing your own experiences in the workplace
  • You also undertake supervised clinical practice, participate in skills based workshops, and teach others through presentation of theoretical readings and clinical cases

Assessment

  • Your grade is made up of coursework marks, including essays and reflective reports and exam marks

Fees and funding

Home/UK fee

£9,250

International fee

£16,850

EU students commencing their course in the 2021-22 academic year will be liable for the International fee.

Fees will increase for each academic year of study.

Home/UK fees and funding information

International fees and funding information

What's next

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Check out our Visit Us pages to find out more information about booking onto one of our events. And if the dates aren’t suitable for you, feel free to book a campus tour here.

2021 Open Days (Colchester Campus)

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  • Saturday, September 18, 2021
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Find out more about Clearing

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