Event

Business Responsibility for Slavery: When, How, and Why should Businesses contribute to Reparations?

Dr Tara Van Ho, Lecturer in the School of Law and the Human Rights Centre will discuss this question with Professor Kehinde Andrews (Birmingham City University), Professor Erika George (The University of Utah), Dr Keston Perry (University of the West of England, Bristol) and Jodi-Ann Quarrie, Lawyer and Broadcaster.

  • Wed 11 Nov 20

    18:00 - 19:30

  • Online

  • Event type

    Lectures, talks and seminars
    Essex Explores

  • Event organiser

    Corporate events

  • Contact details

    Holly Ward

As the UK grapples with the legacy of slavery, UK corporations are considering their own responsibilities.

The Bank of England, Lloyd’s, and Greene King have issued ‘apologies’ for the involvement of their leadership in the slave trade. Lloyd’s and Greene King also promised to invest in Black and Minority Ethnic communities. Thus far, these initiatives have been voluntary. Through a conversation, we will examine the responsibility of businesses to pay reparations for their involvement in the slave trade. What does it look like for businesses to truly repent for their past actions? How should businesses do this? We will also consider links between the historical injustices and modern economic inequality (domestically and internationally), and to problems in modern supply chains.

Dr Tara Van Ho, Lecturer in the School of Law and the Human Rights Centre will discuss this question with Professor Kehinde Andrews (Birmingham City University), Professor Erika George (The University of Utah), Dr Keston Perry (University of the West of England, Bristol) and Jodi-Ann Quarrie, Lawyer and Broadcaster.

For Please register in advance for this event.

 

Photo credit:  Aneta Pawlik on Unsplash

As the UK grapples with the legacy of slavery, UK corporations are considering their own responsibilities. The Bank of England, Lloyd’s, and Greene King have issued ‘apologies’ for the involvement of their leadership in the slave trade. Lloyd’s and Greene King also promised to invest in Black and Minority Ethnic communities. Thus far, these initiatives have been voluntary. Through a conversation, we will examine the responsibility of businesses to pay reparations for their involvement in the slave trade. What does it look like for businesses to truly repent for their past actions? How should businesses do this? We will also consider links between the historical injustices and modern economic inequality (domestically and internationally), and to problems in modern supply chains.
Business Responsibility for Slavery: When, How, and Why should Businesses contribute to Reparations?

Related events