2020 applicants
Event

Barriers to being queer inclusive: Teacher’s perspective

EJ-Francis Caris-Hamer from the Department of Sociology will discuss 'Barriers to being queer inclusive: Teacher’s perspective' as part of the Essex Explores lecture series

  • Wed 24 Jun 20

    19:00 - 20:00

  • Online

  • Event speaker

    EJ-Francis Caris-Hamer

  • Event type

    Lectures, talks and seminars
    Essex Explores

  • Event organiser

    Corporate events

  • Contact details

    Holly Ward

EJ-Francis Caris-Hamer from the Department of Sociology will discuss 'Barriers to being queer inclusive: Teacher’s perspective' as part of the Essex Explores lecture series.

Effective inclusive practices in schools are important as they enhance the well-being and learning experiences of all pupils, and encourage them to embrace social justice within their own lives. Currently, the English education sector reflects a culture of differing inclusive practices within schools. The 2017 Stonewall School Report concluded that whilst there have been improvements, schools still reinforce a culture where heterosexism and queer-phobia co-exist and continue to prevail, seventeen years after the repeal of Section 28.

Academic scholarship recognises that some teachers are equally responsible for discrimination towards marginalised queer students as their peers. Teachers, in particular, are key to accomplishing inclusivity in schools. Yet little research addresses teachers and their perceived barriers to being queer inclusive after the repeal of Section 28. This research addresses this gap by focusing on exploring the most common barriers to a teacher’s ability to ensure their pedagogy is queer inclusive within English education. Part one of this research used semi-structured interviews to gain the lived experiences of teachers from the 11-19 education sector. Analysing from the lens of critical queer theory this research determined that the education sector is still profoundly heteronormative and that the barriers to challenging this include teachers’ personal faith, a fear of hegemonic masculinity that exists within education, and the impact of marketisation on pedagogical practices. This research concludes that interventions should be directed at teachers, rather than students, to ensure that schools foster a culture of social justice for all students. This lecture also considers some practical tips to develop a more inclusive pedagogical practice.

Find out more about Essex Explores.

Barriers to being queer inclusive: Teacher’s perspective

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