Event

Immigrant franchise and immigration policy: Evidence from the Progressive Era

Join Giovanni Facchini for this week's Department of Economics External Seminar

  • Tue 22 Oct 19

    16:15 - 17:30

  • Colchester Campus

    Economics Common Room 5B.307

  • Event speaker

    Giovanni Facchini

  • Event type

    Lectures, talks and seminars
    Department of Economics External Seminars

  • Event organiser

    Economics, Department of

In today's seminar Giovanni Facchini, from the University of Nottingham, discusses his paper on Immigrant franchise and immigration policy: Evidence from the Progressive Era

Abstract:

What is the role played by immigrant groups in shaping migration policy in the destination country?

We address this question focusing on the U.S. during the Progressive Era. In this period, residency requirements to exercise the voting franchise varied significantly across states, and consequently naturalized U.S. citizens were unevenly able to influence House Representatives.

We show that congressmen representing districts with large numbers of naturalized U.S. citizens were more likely to support open migration policy. This effect is reversed as residency requirements become more stringent.

We find suggestive evidence that electoral accountability played a key role in shaping their behavior.

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