Event

Catalyst Conference 2019

The Catalyst Conference will showcase the outputs of our collaborative initiatives, unpack the challenges and highlight the future potential that data science can offer from high level systems change through to improvements on the ground.

The Conference programme is of particular interest to colleagues based in local authorities with responsibility for technology and digital transformation services, ICT, service improvement, data analytics, operations and corporate and customer services.


Reserve your free place

About the Catalyst Project 

The Catalyst Project is a local partnership between the University of Essex, Suffolk County Council and Essex County Council working to improve community services for vulnerable people. The project was awarded £2.2 million by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), a non-departmental public body that funds innovative and strategic projects and is now monitored by the Office for Students (OfS).

Using the University’s cross disciplinary expertise in data analytics and evaluation the Catalyst Project has been developing new tools supporting public service organisations to assess and predict risk for vulnerable members of the community and to fully understand the impact of their service initiatives.

The Catalyst Project Risk Stratification Team have developed a bespoke machine learning tool to help Suffolk County Council (SCC) colleagues to assess the level of risk for individuals, in order to provide timely responses and interventions.

The Catalyst Project Evaluation Team have developed the Spotlight Toolkit, an interactive decision making platform tailored for local authorities. The Spotlight Toolkit aids the design of impact evaluations in order to streamline and better understand the effectiveness of public service initiatives. Both tools are currently being piloted at our partner organisations.

 Essex Volunteering Hub

The project’s third work stream dedicated to improving services for vulnerable members of the community and further strengthening the University’s relationship with the local community, is to increase volunteering opportunities through the development of a one-stop Essex Volunteering Hub. The hub will provide a single system to register and record volunteering activity opportunities and volunteering hours logged serving students, external and university volunteer providers.

With Catalyst Project support, student volunteering time has increased substantially over the last 3 years to an average of 30,000 volunteering hours per academic year and has led to students volunteering with 44 external local community organisations in 2018/19 to date. Visit the Catalyst website for further information on all our initiatives.

Conference programme

The conference will be centred on the work carried out by the Catalyst Project across two main work streams:

  1. Risk Stratification: using predictive analytics to better target public service resources
  2. Evaluation: empowering public services to evaluate the impact of their programmes

9.30am
Registration

10am
Conference welcome by Professor Lorna Fox O'Mahony, Deputy Vice Chancellor (Designate), University of Essex

10.10am
Keynote: 'Using digital Innovation to improve public services’ delivered by Stephen Kavanagh, Former Chief Constable of Essex Police and National Lead for Digital Policing Portfolio

10.30am 
Panel debate: 'Digital innovation -  implementing system change within local government, and the importance of collaborative multi-agency partnerships’ Chaired by Stephen Kavanagh and discussed by:

  • Gavin Jones, Essex County Council Chief Executive
  • Nicola Beach, Suffolk County Council Chief Executive Officer
  • Ben-Julian Harrington, Essex Police Chief Constable
  • Professor Maria Fasli, University of Essex, Director of Institute for Analytics and Data Science and the Business and Local Government Data Research Centre

11.45am
Workshops:

  • A. The Spotlight Toolkit: an interactive decision making platform for impact evaluation
  • B. Data Sharing: How to overcome organisational/behavioural issues to allow effective data sharing between organisations. A solution focused workshop
  • C. The value of data analysis in policing serious crime

1pm
Lunch and networking

2pm
Workshops:

  • D. Data + People + Action = Essex Centre for Data Analytics
  • E. Application of predictive analytics in social care: tools to support decision making 
  • F. Evaluating community resilience: A new database can help strengthen resilience in your own community
  • G. Stats Maps Chats: Using ethnographic research and asset mapping to explore perceptions of antisocial behaviour and domestic abuse

3pm
Panel debate: 'The legal and ethical considerations required for effective data collection, sharing and analysis' Chaired by Professor Maria Fasli and discussed by:

  • Jen Housego, Head of Digital Change, Essex Police - Essex Centre for Data Analytics (ECDA)
  • Anna Crispe, Head of Knowledge and Intelligence, Suffolk County Council
  • Professor Lorna McGregor, Director of the Human Rights Centre, Co-Director of the Human Rights, Big Data and Technology Centre, University of Essex
  • Dr Ben Taylor, Digital Project Lead, Open Innovation Team, Cabinet Office

3.45pm
Conference round-up from Professor Lorna Fox O'Mahony, Deputy Vice Chancellor (Designate), University of Essex

4pm
Conference close

Travel

Essex Business School)
Essex Business School

The conference is taking place at Essex Business School:

University of Essex
Colchester Campus
Wivenhoe Park
Colchester
CO4 3SQ

Accommodation

Accommodation can be found on campus at the University’s country house hotel, Wivenhoe House.

Single occupancy starts from £99 with further options to include dining and breakfast in their award-winning brasserie.

Meet the speakers and panellists

Professor Lorna Fox O’Mahony 

Professor Lorna Fox O’Mahony is Deputy Vice-Chancellor Designate and Professor of Law at the University of Essex. Her role as a member of the University Executive Team includes strategic oversight of the implementation of the University Strategy, planning and resource allocation processes and human resources strategy. Lorna supported the Vice-Chancellor in leading the development of the University Strategy 2019-25. She is a Colchester Ambassador, co-Chair of the South East Creative Economy Network and was founding Chair of the Creative Colchester Partnership Board. Lorna’s research focuses on property, housing and home.

Stephen Kavanagh 

 

Stephen Kavanagh served as Chief Constable of Essex Police from May 2013 until October 2018 when he retired from the Police force. He has a broad strategic and operational policing experience in the areas that public partnerships face in the digital age. Whilst serving as Chief Constable he led on transforming the operating culture and IT infrastructure to introduce a more agile and effective workforce.

Prior to becoming the Chief Constable of Essex Police Stephen held a number of senior roles in the Metropolitan Police Service. In 2010 he was selected to be the Commander Counter Terrorism (SO15). He was then selected as Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Territorial Policing and was appointed the change lead for local policing to deliver cross cutting efficiency programmes. He became the Acting Assistant Commissioner at the time of the London Riots in 2011 and was selected as the Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Specialist Operations in London in 2012.

Stephen has contributed to broader policing through his membership of different bodies. He was appointed Chair of the Essex Criminal Justice Board, the Association of Chief Police Officers lead for Open Source Intelligence and then appointed College of Policing Community Chair for Crime, Criminal Justice and Terrorism. As the first National Police Chief Council lead for the Digital Policing Portfolio he was responsible for working with industry, international forces, the Home Office, Police ICT Company, Police Reform and Transformation Board and Chief Constables’ Council to coordinate and support the delivery of three key strands of work - Digital Public Contact, Digital Investigations and Intelligence and Digital Criminal Justice.

In 2018 he was decorated with the Queen’s Policing Medal (QPM) for his distinguished service and contribution to policing in the United Kingdom.

Gavin Jones 

Gavin Jones has served as Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Essex County Council since 2016, having previously spent 10 years as CEO of Swindon Borough Council. Gavin was listed as one of the top 50 New Radicals in the Sunday Observer’s national campaign for Britain’s most innovative leaders and voted one of the most influential leaders in Local Government.

He is currently Chair of The Society of Local Authority Chief Executives and Senior Managers (SOLACE Group) Ltd. Gavin is passionate about bringing change to local government, bringing together stakeholders and partner organisations to develop relationships at the local, regional and national levels in order to deliver a transformed service provision.

Gavin oversees local services which impact on the most vulnerable members of our local communities, while at the same time driving forward innovation and the changes we need to make to Essex County Council.

Nicola Beach 

Nicola Beach is the Chief Executive of Suffolk County Council. Before joining Suffolk in May 2018, Nicola was Executive Director for Infrastructure and Environment at Essex County Council, where she developed an ambitious agenda for sustainable growth and environmental services. Over her 24 years in local government Nicola has worked in many senior roles in the eastern region including Chief Executive of Braintree District Council. Nicola’s focus throughout her career has been on strong relationships and purposeful partnership working.

Ben-Julian Harrington 

Ben-Julian Harrington has a strong and varied background in operational policing in London and now Essex. In taking up his role as Chief Constable of Essex, BJ has set a clear ambition for the force to be Skilled, Equipped and Enabled to use data and technology to keep society safe. Building on existing work this sees Essex Police leading the exploration of data analytics with the University of Essex and Essex County Council, as well as working with key technology partners to innovate and develop. Whilst no expert in the digital arena, he has a firm commitment to ensuring he, the police and the wider public services use these new opportunities to further protect society.

Professor Maria Fasli

Professor Maria Fasli is the Director of the ESRC Business and Local Government Data Research Centre, and Director of the Institute for Analytics and Data Science. Educated in Greece, Maria then obtained her PhD in Computer Science from the University of Essex in 2000. Holding positions at Essex since 1999, Maria served as Head of School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering (CSEE). In 2005, she was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship by the HEA UK for her novel approaches to education and supporting the student experience. In 2016, Maria was awarded the UNESCO Chair in Analytics and Data Science.

Maria’s research interests lie in artificial intelligence techniques for complex systems and analysing and modelling structured/unstructured data, and the legal and ethical considerations involved in this. She has been funded by Research Councils and other organisations (over £8M to date). Maria has worked on multiple company projects, published over 130 papers, and has delivered keynotes to international conferences worldwide.

Jennifer Housego 

Jennifer Housego joined Essex Police in May 2015, to lead on digital transformation. Prior to that Jennifer spent 9 years as a Senior Manager in the National Crime Agency having joined the Serious Organised Crime Agency when it first started on the 1st April 2006. Jennifer first became interested in data ethics whilst studying for a Masters in Intelligence, Analytics and Media. She completed her dissertation on data ethics, and served as co-chair for the Independent Data Ethics Panel for Policing for 18 months. Jennifer now serves on the data ethics committee for West Midlands Police as a subject matter expert, and leads on data ethics for the Essex Centre for Data Analytics (ECDA).

 Anna Crispe

Anna Crispe holds a BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford University, and an MSc in Public Health and Health Economics from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She joined Public Health Suffolk in 2015 and is now the Head of Knowledge and Intelligence at Suffolk County Council.

Anna has been instrumental in establishing the Suffolk Office for Data & Analytics (SODA), which aims to generate new insight from innovative use of data across the Suffolk public sector system and includes work on information governance, information technology and advanced analytics. She sits on the Council’s Corporate Information Governance Board, and is the lead for information governance for Public Health Suffolk.

Anna is also helping to drive the introduction of population health analytics in Suffolk through collaboration with West Suffolk Hospital, Cerner, and the Suffolk & North East Essex Integrated Care System.

Professor Lorna McGregor 

Lorna McGregor is Professor of International Human Rights Law and Director of the Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex. Lorna's current research focuses on big data, artificial intelligence (AI) and human rights; all forms of detention under international law; access to justice; and the role of international human rights law in addressing global challenges. She is the PI and Director of the multidisciplinary ESRC Human Rights, Big Data and Technology (HRBDT) project. Her research has been funded by the British Academy, the ESRC and the Nuffield Foundation. Lorna is a Co-Chair of the International Law Association's Study Group on Individual Responsibility in International Law and a Contributing Editor of EJIL Talk! She has held positions as a Commissioner of the British Equality and Human Rights Commission (2015 - 2019) and as a trustee of the AIRE Centre. Prior to becoming an academic, Lorna held positions at REDRESS, the International Bar Association, and the International Centre for Ethnic Studies in Sri Lanka.

Ben Taylor

Ben Taylor currently leads the digital projects for the Cabinet Office Open Innovation Team (OIT), which aims to deepen collaborations between government and academia. He previously worked as a policy analyst to House of Lords' select committees, including committees on artificial intelligence, alcohol licensing and bribery, and completed a PhD at King’s College London in the history of technology.

Workshops

Morning workshops 11.45am - 1pm

Workshop A - The Spotlight Toolkit

The Spotlight Toolkit: an interactive decision making platform for impact evaluation.

Location: EBS2.66

Synopsis: The Catalyst Programme Evaluation Team draws on 3 years’ experience to create the Spotlight Toolkit. Based on collaborations with local authorities such as Essex County Fire and Rescue Services, Essex County Council, Suffolk County Council, and the Local Area Coordination Network, the Team created Spotlight to help public service organisations design their own evaluations. This workshop outlines the need for evaluation in the public and third sector agenda, and describes how Spotlight can help organisations meet that need. Learn about Spotlight’s functionality, trial the tool to understand how an organisation would use it, and view demonstrations of how Spotlight can generate bespoke outputs for an organisation and its evaluation design.

Delivered by: Gina Yannitell Reinhardt

Speaker biography: Dr. Gina Yannitell Reinhardt joined the Government Department at the University of Essex in late 2015 and was asked to direct the Catalyst Programme Evaluation work stream in early 2016 having had 10 years’ experience teaching impact and programme evaluation in the United States. Leading collaborations between her team and local authorities such as Essex County Fire and Rescue Services, Essex County Council, Suffolk County Council, Dr Reinhardt has developed the Spotlight Toolkit platform to build evaluation capacity. Her evaluation work can be found at the University of Essex Research Repository and in journals such as Local Government Studies.

 

Workshop B - Data sharing

Data sharing: how to overcome organisational and behavioural issues to allow effective data sharing between organisations


Location: EBS2.40

Synopsis: Realising the potential of Data Science approaches to public service reform is principally dependent on being able to find, acquire and assimilate data from other public service agencies and beyond, and to share the data with commercial or academic partners. This data sharing has often proved more difficult, slow and resource hungry than was initially expected. Although technology can facilitate and governance can control data sharing, it ultimately relies on complex human behaviour.

This solution-focused workshop will examine how core six traditions in the behavioural sciences – focused on rules, roles, rewards, relationships, routines and rationalisations – can help us “unlock” data. Participants will draw on their professional experience to help to design a toolkit for changing data sharing behaviour.

Delivered by: James Cornford

Speaker biography:  James Cornford is a Senior Lecturer in the University of East Anglia’s Norwich Business School where he co-ordinates the Innovation, Technology and Operations Management (ITOM) Group. His research is focused on the strategic, organisational and practice aspects of information management and data analytics, mainly in the public sector and mixed settings. Most recently, he has been researching data-driven digitalisation in the Fire and Rescue Service and use of information in the reform of Adoption in England.

Workshop C - The value of data analysis in policing

The value of data analysis in policing serious crime 

Location: EBS2.50

Synopsis:  Analysing the data provided by the Essex Police we are able to gain an understanding on when and where certain offences take place and identify the demographics behind victims and perpetrators. Using statistical tools we can create maps and plots that can help the police better visualise the data they possess in order to be able to commit resources where they are most needed. Police data can be enriched with publicly available data such as demographics and deprivation indexes to give a better view on the reasons some areas might become more prone to different types of crimes. 

Delivered by: Jason Hendy, Chris McGlade, Rosanna Walker, Andrei Toderas 

Speaker biographies:

  • Detective Superintendent Jason Hendy has 28 years’ experience in policing spending 25 years in the Metropolitan Police Service before transferring to Essex as a Detective Chief Inspector.  In the summer of 2017 he was promoted to Detective Superintendent and took up the role of Head of Investigations for Crime and Public Protection. Chairing the Eastern Region Child Sexual Exploitation Board is one of a number of responsibilities and roles he leads on around keeping children safe.
  • Detective Inspector Chris McGlade has 17 years’ experience in policing, spending 10 years with the Metropolitan Police Service before transferring to Essex Police.  Chris has spent the majority of his career as a Detective and has held specialist roles, across three ranks, within child abuse investigation and the public protection arena.  He is currently the North Essex Public Protection Investigation Unit Detective Inspector with responsibility for partnership working.
  • PC Rosanna Walker has been working for Essex Police for the last 2 years in the Colchester Community Policing team, as part of the Police ‘Now’ scheme whose mission is to transform communities, reduce crime and increase the public’s confidence in policing. Rosanna came from an academic background and joined the Police with the simple desire to keep people safe. Rosanna has been discussing ways in which Essex Police and the University of Essex can work together to tackle serious crime as effectively as possible by using an evidence-based approach.
  • Andrei Toderas holds an MSc in Psychology. His expertise lies in data manipulation and analysis including advanced machine learning techniques. He is working as a research analyst for the Catalyst Project and is responsible for the curation of data and data analysis. As part of his Catalyst work he is developing risk model platforms in R, a software environment for statistical computing. He is also providing data analysis results in the form of reports and contributes to scientific publications.

Afternoon workshops 2pm - 3pm

Workshop D - Essex Centre for Data Analytics

Data + People + Action = Essex Centre for Data Analytics

Location: EBS2.66

Synopsis: Do you want to embed an evidence-first culture within your organisation?
 
Focusing on the things that really matter – data, people and action - has enabled the Essex Centre for Data Analytics to create remarkable impact within Essex.
 
Ensuring people are at the heart of the decision-making process; embedding collaborative and transparent working practices; building data communities to share skills, knowledge and expertise; and evaluating impact, has been fundamental to enabling the ethical sharing of data to generate new insight and inform thinking across Essex.
 
In this breakout session we will share our experience of creating a centre of excellence that has brought together extensive data and is turning insight into action to tackle some of Essex’s biggest challenges earlier, to deliver real impact and whole system transformation to improve outcomes for people, place and public services.

Delivered by: Vicki Harrington, Nicola Mallet, Stephen Simpkin, Mark Johnson

Speaker biographies:

  • Dr Vicki Harrington joined Essex Police as Director of Strategic Change and Performance in March 2016. She has worked in the private and public sector and in a policing environment for more than fifteen years. Working as a Principal Researcher in the Research, Development and Statistics Directorate of the Home Office, Vicki conducted and published primary research on crime and policing. Vicki then joined Kent Police where she worked in a number of roles including as Head of Corporate Development where she acted as principal advisor to the Chief Officer team with responsibility for strategic planning and performance, research, analysis and consultation and inspection and governance. Vicki has a first class honours degree in Geography and a PhD from Kent University.

  • Nicola Mallett is the acting Head of Data and Analytics at Essex County Council, empowering the organisation, and its strategic partners, to make evidence-based decisions to transform the whole system approach to tackling challenges using analytics.  She has a natural thirst for insight and excels at unlocking the power of data and analytics by making the complex simple and turning insight into action. 

  • Stephen Simpkin  has been working across the research and analytics teams at Essex County Council (ECC) for 12 years since graduating with a degree in Psychology, Social Science, & Statistics. During his time at ECC he has always sought opportunities to apply analytics for social good. He has been an advocate for the use of predictive analytics for the last decade, and has helped integrate the practice across public service analytics teams in Essex and beyond. His work in the field of predictive analytics includes: ‘I predict a Riot’ – using open source data to quantify characteristics that led to 2011 riots (highly commended at national crime conference) and ‘Social Isolation and Loneliness Risk Index’ – predicting key hotspots and drivers of socially isolated adults (featured on BBC News).
  • Mark Johnson has worked in research and analysis for over 20 years, 15 of those years have been spent in policing with Essex and Kent Police. He served as a special constable for 10 years at Maidstone. He also ran his own company and worked in the academic sector. Mark has worked on several national police projects including the testing and adoption of predictive patrol models, performance analysis, neighbourhood task teams, using economics in intelligence analysis, rapid forensics and digital forensic hubs. Mark is Head of Analytics at Essex Police, he is currently working with the Home Office on the use of AI to cleanse and enrich knife crime data. He is also a senior core team member of the Essex Centre for Data Analytics (ECDA) and has played a central role in the shaping and delivery of ECDA.

Workshop E - Predictive analytics in social care

Application of predictive analytics in social care: tools to support decision making

Location: EBS2.50

Synopsis: Using historical data provided by Suffolk County Council and cutting-edge machine learning methods we are able to analyse data and output a prediction probability for future enquiries. The output is a ranking of cases that can be used to prioritise the workload for workers and identify cases that due to subtle characteristics might not have gained much prior attention.

In order to make it easy for stakeholders to understand the data and use the algorithms created by us, we have implemented some platform tools that offer the ability for people with little statistical skills to work with very complex machine learning techniques.

Delivered by: Seb Smith, Olga Sergushova and Andrei Toderas

Speaker biographies:

  • Seb Smith is Head of Service for Suffolk Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub, (MASH) and the Emergency Duty Service. Suffolk MASH manages over 22,000 contacts each year and ensures that proportionate responses are delivered to children and their families in a timely way.
  • Olga Sergushova has a doctorate in Mathematical Sciences. She has gained experience in quantitative analysis, in particular from working in a risk management team where she was responsible for projects requiring complex multivariable analysis, optimisation and data simulation. 
    Now as a Research Data Scientist for the Catalyst Risk Stratification team she provides statistical support on predictive modelling, risk estimation, and identification of risk factors in a series of applications.   
  • Andrei Toderas holds an MSc in Psychology. His expertise lies in data manipulation and analysis including advanced machine learning techniques. 
    He is working as a research analyst for the Catalyst Project and is responsible for the curation of data and data analysis. As part of his Catalyst work he is developing risk model platforms in R, a software environment for statistical computing. He is also providing data analysis results in the form of reports and contributes to scientific publications.

Workshop F - Evaluating Community Resilience

Evaluating Community Resilience: A new database can help strengthen resilience in your own community 

Location: EBS2.68

Synopsis: This session will showcase the Resilience Policy Database, a collection of disaster and emergency policies around the world.

We will:

  • present the rationale behind the database, and how it could help us improve measures of natural disaster resilience at national and local levels.
  • outline aspects of the dataset of relevance to practitioners and interested parties in disaster and emergency planning and how it can be used to inform policy making.We will also place this new dataset in the context of ongoing work to create a resilience index at the municipal level.

Participants will be guided through the different sections of the online resource, as well as having the opportunity to explore the documents as well.

Delivered by: Dr Gina Yannitell Reinhardt, Queal King

Speaker biographies:

  • Dr. Gina Yannitell Reinhardt joined the Government Department at the University of Essex in late 2015 and was asked to direct the Catalyst Programme Evaluation work stream in early 2016 having had 10 years’ experience teaching impact and programme evaluation in the United States. Leading collaborations between her team and local authorities such as Essex County Fire and Rescue Services, Essex County Council, Suffolk County Council, Dr Reinhardt has developed the Spotlight Toolkit platform to build evaluation capacity. Her evaluation work can be found at the University of Essex Research Repository and in journals such as Local Government Studies
  • Queal King is a second-year undergraduate student in the Department of Economics at the University of Essex. As part of an Undergraduate Research Placement (UROP), he led on the discovery and cataloguing of the policy documents in a coherent collection. He has an interest in Health Economics and is actively researching the cause and effect interactions between policies and their outcomes.

 

Workshop G - Stats Maps & Chats

Stats Maps & Chats: Using ethnographic research and asset mapping to explore perceptions of antisocial behaviour and domestic abuse 

Location: EBS 2.46

Synopsis: Anti-social behaviour (ASB) is an issue in both public and private spaces, with perception of ASB being a particular issue for young people in Colchester, with certain public spaces seen as hotspots by the authorities. ASB can be the first indicator of domestic abuse, with 40% of domestic abuse victims having been reported for ASB.  This session draws on two related Catalyst funded projects, the Colchester Borough Councils commissioned ‘Young Colchester’ report and the Colchester Borough Homes commissioned work on identifying the risk factors associated with domestic abuse victimisation in Colchester.  

The session will focus on the range of methods used to explore issues from both initiatives and the impact that the research has had on the commissioning organisations.

Delivered by: Sonia Carr, Carlene Cornish, Karen Loweman, Melanie Rundle, and Ruth Weir 

Speaker biographies:

  • Sonia Carr is the Community Safety and Safeguarding Coordinator and at Colchester Borough Council. 
  • Dr Carlene Cornish has a PhD in Sociology of Education which focussed on critical policy analysis and ethnographic research focussed on those Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) and at-risk youth within the post-16 education sector. Carlene has been working as a research assistant on the ‘Young Colchester: Life Chances, ASSETS and Antisocial Behaviour (ASB)’ project. She is currently a Lecturer in the School of Education, Health and Social Care at the Colchester Institute, teaching both undergraduate and post graduate courses on Health and Social Care.
  • Karen Loweman has been the Director of Housing at Colchester Borough Homes for the past 10 years, having worked in Housing and Community roles for more than 25 years.
     In her current role Karen represents Housing on the Colchester Community Safety, Responsible authorities' group, and manages Housing management and Options teams including those responding to anti-social behaviour and homelessness. “At Colchester Borough Homes we want to demonstrate the links between the causation and resolution of the breakdown in neighbourhoods which lead to anti-social behaviour;  to help people to understand that they can be part of the solution” 
    Karen holds the Chartered Institute of Housing professional qualification and an HND in Housing.
  • Melanie Rundle the Communities Group Manager, Safety and Protection at Colchester Borough Council.
  • Ruth Weir is a Research Fellow on the Catalyst Project.  Ruth’s PhD research has identified the predictors of domestic abuse at the neighbourhood level.  Prior to working for the university Ruth has worked in several local government research roles and for the Home Office.