MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Modern History and Politics options

Final Year, Component 02

History option(s
HR282-6-SP
Witch-Trials in Early Modern Europe and New England
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you’ll focus on witchcraft beliefs and witch-hunts (the legal prosecutions of individuals for the crime of witchcraft) in Europe and New England between the 15th and 18th centuries. You examine beliefs about witches, witchcraft, and the powers of the Devil at both elite and popular levels, set in the wider context of the religious/magical world-view of the period.

HR308-6-FY
Britain’s Second World War: Mass Observation, Myth and Memory
(30 CREDITS)

This final year module examines and compares the experience of the British people during the Second World War, the myth-making that was a part of this experience, and the shifting cultural memory of the war in Britain from 1945 to the present day. It makes extensive use of the Mass Observation Online Archive (available online via the Albert Sloman library) to examine the British experience of war and to consider how people represented the war themselves. It is a full year Module that, in the first term, focuses on the war years, introducing students to the history of the war, to Mass Observation, and to the processes by which wartime culture created the enduring myths of Dunkirk, the Blitz, the Battle of Britain and the People's War. The module uses Mass Observation alongside other primary sources to consider which stories became a part of these myths, and which were excluded or marginalised. In the second term the focus turns to the cultural memory of the war in Britain since 1945. Students are introduced to concepts and theories of cultural memory that they will go on to apply to representations of the war that are studied. The memory of the war is traced from 1945 to the current day, with themes examined including the popularity of the war film, the mobilisation of the Second World War in Britain's subsequent wars, the growth of the wartime anniversary, museums and memorials, and the 'memory wars' that have been a central aspect of the Brexit debate since 2016.

HR329-6-AU
Maritime Life in the Age of Sail
(15 CREDITS)

Sailors held the early modern empires together. Without them, there would have been no colonies, no migration, no East India trade, and no African Diaspora. This module covers Atlantic maritime history from ca. 1415 to ca. 1850, including the 'Age of Discovery', sailor life, labour, maritime social history, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, fishing and whaling, the Age of Revolution, and (of course) piracy.

HR352-6-AU
The Common People: History From Below in Britain 1830-1914
(15 CREDITS)

Britain underwent profound transformations between 1830 and 1950. It became the first indisputably modern, industrial capitalist society in the world. Not only was the environment turned upside down, but the lives and identities of the British people were altered fundamentally. You’ll explore this process in a thematic as well as a chronological manner, and study labour, class, gender, the state, democracy, imperialism, culture, and poverty.

HR370-6-FY
The Tudors and Stuarts on Film
(30 CREDITS)

Film shapes the views of more people regarding the past than any other medium. This is particularly true for early modern England, which has been a popular subject area for filmmakers. You’ll examine and analyse popular films dealing with England from the reigns of Henry VIII to Charles II, which were made from 1933 until the present. This module seeks to study the films as representations of the past, in the same way that historical novels, dramas and paintings are representations of the past.

HR373-6-AU
War and Society in South Africa and Britain: the Great Colonial War and its impact
(15 CREDITS)
HR619-6-SP
The Russian Revolution 1905-1924
(15 CREDITS)

The Russian Revolution was one of the most important events in the 20th Century. It brought an end to Tsarist rule and gave birth to the first socialist state. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of the Russian Revolution as a larger process that started long before 1917 and did not end in 1917 or even in 1921. You’ll receive an overview of different interpretations, and of former and current scholarly debates.

HR645-6-SP
From Liberation to the Tiananmen Massacre: China From Mao to Deng Xiaoping, 1949-1992
(15 CREDITS)

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