MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Philosophy, Politics and Economics options

Final Year, Component 04

Final year Economics or Politics or Philosophy option(s) from list
CE322-6-AU
Algorithmic Game Theory
(15 CREDITS)
CS300-6-SP
Community Engagement: Group Projects
(15 CREDITS)

This module offers final year students a unique opportunity to work together in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world project for a local partner organisation. It enables you to use the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired during your degree to address a real-world challenge, while sharing and developing your creative, organisational and practical abilities. By doing so, this module will prepare you for entering the graduate labour market or going on to post-graduate study.

CS301-6-AU
Dangerous Ideas: Essays as Social Criticism
(15 CREDITS)

Is Montaigne right to wonder whether we Westerners are worse off morally than tribes who practice cannibalism? What kind of writing does George Orwell champion? What did Marx and Engels achieve with ‘The Communist Manifesto’? Examine the ‘dangerous ideas’ presented in a range of subversive essays and manifestos. Study how they challenge and satirise existing ideas and social arrangements. Experiment with writing, thus broadening the approach of your own essays.

CS301-6-SP
Dangerous Ideas: Manifestos as Social Criticism
(15 CREDITS)

Is Montaigne right to wonder whether we Westerners are worse off morally than tribes who practice cannibalism? What kind of writing does George Orwell champion? What did Marx and Engels achieve with ‘The Communist Manifesto’? Examine the ‘dangerous ideas’ presented in a range of subversive essays and manifestos. Study how they challenge and satirise existing ideas and social arrangements. Experiment with writing, thus broadening the approach of your own essays.

CS315-6-AU
Global Challenges in Interdisciplinary Perspective: Water Conflicts, Water Cultures
(15 CREDITS)

Access to water is one of the most urgent global challenges facing us today. Vital for health and well-being, as well as integral to indigenous cultures and industrial processes, water is a threatened commons and contested commodity. In this module, we will explore global and local case studies that highlight challenges of scarcity, contamination, privatization, and climate change, and the cultural importance of bodies of water for diverse communities. We will examine water-related problems, such as economic and urban development, grassroots activism, political conflict, community relations, heritage and public health.

EC203-6-SP
Technological change: past, present and future prospects
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you will focus on the economic history of economic growth and technical change centred on the 'second industrial revolution' and stemming from the advances in the latter part of the 19th century. Beginning with an overview of global patterns of growth to the early 21st century, you’ll be introduced to macroeconomic approaches to long-run growth, in particular accounting for technological change. You’ll focus on case studies of key sectors contributing to technical progress, including electricity, chemicals, in the late 19th century through to Information and Communications Technology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

EC209-6-SP
Introduction to Behavioural Economics
(15 CREDITS)

This module introduces students to the field of behavioural economics which combines economic analysis with insights from psychology to understand human behaviour. This module is offered at second year undergraduate, and at third year undergraduate. While the content is the same for both levels, the learning outcomes assessed in the modules are slightly different.

EC261-6-SP
Management of New Technology
(15 CREDITS)

What economic issues do computing firms face today? What about the pharmaceutical industry? Or telecommunication organisations? How does new technological knowledge allow these firms to keep a competitive edge? Using real-life case studies, learn how economics model-building methodology helps with the challenges of managing new technology in the modern world.

EC322-6-SP
Microeconomics (Advanced)
(15 CREDITS)

Gain a rich background in the concepts and techniques of game theory, its uses, limitations and issues. The course is also applied, focussing on several important cases of strategic interaction, including auctions, interactions between rival firms, moral hazard and adverse selection, and the theory of the firm. Upon completion of the course, you will be able to evaluate the impact the strategic considerations in the analysis of interactions among decision-makers, and you will have learned how to apply game theory to issues in microeconomics.

EC324-6-AU
Macroeconomics (Advanced)
(15 CREDITS)

This module develops the material started in Intermediate Macroeconomics and aims to give students an understanding of the main types of economic data; how those data are collected, constructed and used and Key ideas in the module will be illustrated with reference to recent events and current policy debates. Upon successful completion of this module, you will be able to approach macroeconomic data critically, and to evaluate the strength of empirical evidence for macroeconomic theories and macroeconomic policy positions.

EC335-6-SP
Strategies of Economic Development
(15 CREDITS)

This module examines the distinctive features of less developed economies and introduces you to the literature that attempts to explain the persistence of poverty in those economies. We start with a historical analysis of the growth process to examine why there has been a divergence in the performances between the developed and the developing countries. The module will then elaborate on the role of institutions and incentives in shaping long run economic development. In particular, we shall examine the role of market imperfections, non-market institutions (such as social norms) and governance institutions.

EC351-6-SP
Mathematical Economics
(15 CREDITS)

Expand on the mathematical techniques you developed in Mathematical Methods in Economics. You’ll learn how to use additional mathematical tools, which will enable you to analyse a larger, richer, and more interesting set of economic models. The main focus of the course is on methods for studying dynamic economic problems. Rather than concentrating exclusively on mathematical techniques, intuition for how and why these techniques work will be developed through application to specific economic problems.

EC352-6-AU
Econometric Methods
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you will explore a range of methods used in the modern application of econometric techniques to economic and financial data. The course will enable you to practise the relevant methods, rather than to derive estimators or tests, or to prove the theorems upon which these are based.

EC355-6-SP
Public Economics
(15 CREDITS)

Analyse the economics rationale for ‘collective choice’ in a market economy in this applied module. Explore social welfare, equity and efficiency, and evaluate the government’s ability to identify and achieve ‘better’ outcomes. By analysing actual programmes in areas of poverty reduction, education, and health, you will be able to apply your knowledge of broad empirical patterns and institutions to real-life situations in the UK and abroad.

EC363-6-SP
Labour Economics
(15 CREDITS)

How have labour markets changed over time? Why is there an increased inequality of wages? In this module, you will investigate the determination of labour market outcomes, and discuss why and how differences across individuals occur. Using practical examples throughout, you will develop vital analytical tools needed to understand wage and employment foundation and trends, and will discuss what makes the labour market so important.

EC365-6-SP
Theory of Monopoly and Regulation
(15 CREDITS)

How does a monopolist make decisions? And what impact do such decisions have? How can regulators control this behaviour? Build your understanding of monopoly industries, starting with the sources, creation and exercise of monopoly power. Critically assess the principles and practices of monopoly regulation, using real-world examples from industry.

EC366-6-AU
Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
(15 CREDITS)

How do firms make decisions? And how do these decisions impact on the prices you pay? What role does game theory play? Understand strategic interaction among firms, using theoretical tools to examine real-world examples. Analyse the main economic forces behind firm behaviour, adapting economic models to study particular challenges.

EC367-6-SP
The Economic Geography of Employment, Innovation and Trade
(15 CREDITS)

Despite all the talk about the “death of distance”, geography matters more than ever. This course is a journey through the current economic landscape. We will try to understand the economic forces driving trends in wages, productivity and innovation across cities and regions. These are the forces that will define the geography of future jobs and will shape the economic destiny of local communities around the world.

EC368-6-AU
International Money and Finance
(15 CREDITS)

How do foreign exchange markets determine trade? Understand the economic role that international currency markets play. Study models to interpret exchange rate movements and how this links to key macroeconomic variables. Analyse real-life policies that respond to events in the international monetary system.

EC371-6-AU
Economic Analysis of Asset Prices
(15 CREDITS)

How do economic theories determine asset prices? Can you apply analytical reasoning to asset pricing problems? Understand capital markets and explore the predictability of asset price changes. Learn to build simple models of asset markets and how to interpret the mathematics of such models in economic terms.

EC372-6-SP
Economics of Financial Markets and Intermediation
(15 CREDITS)

How do you apply economic reasoning to the markets for bonds, futures contracts and financial options? Study the distinctive characteristics of bonds as financial assets. Gain an understanding of derivatives markets, focusing on futures and options. Explore theories of financial intermediation and learn to evaluate models of price determination.

EC386-6-AU
Introduction to Health Economics and Policy
(15 CREDITS)

Why does the government play such an important role in the health care sector? How does the patients’ lack of information affect medical prices? Can we use economics modules to understand the rationale for risky behaviours, such as smoking? These are some of the questions you will try to answer during this module, building on your insights of microeconomic theory, and covering a broad range of concepts, theories, and topics related to the economics of healthcare.

EC387-6-AU
Experimental Methods in Economics
(15 CREDITS)

Experimental Economics has become a very popular method to address questions that are hard to answer with field data. Laboratory experiments are used to investigate individual choice behaviours such as giving to charities, or behaviour in strategic interactions such as financial markets and collective decision making. The experiments are also used to analyse firm behaviour and assess policies such as anti-trust legislation or even monetary policy. In this module, we will critically evaluate whether these experimental methods provide answers for policy makers and private sector decision makers.

EC831-6-FY
Project: Economics
(30 CREDITS)

What interests you? Design and implement your own research project, under the guidance and supervision of our world-leading academic staff. Demonstrate your knowledge of economic ideas in greater depth, building your professional research skills and developing further understanding of a topic that fascinates you.

GV254-6-SP
Ethics and Public Policy
(15 CREDITS)

Is torture ever morally justified? Should pornography be banned? Should prostitution be legalised? Take part in the intellectual search for the moral principles that should govern how we answer these questions and others in governing public policy.

GV300-6-FY
Advanced Quantitative Political Analysis
(30 CREDITS)

Understand how different statistical and experimental methods can be used to answer questions about political phenomena. You evaluate the assumptions of standard statistical tests and the linear regression model, consider alternatives to those, and learn about causal inference.

GV303-6-SP
Electoral Behaviour
(15 CREDITS)

Examine how people reason about voting and politics, and why people vote the way that they do. You consider the effects of institutions such as the electoral system or the number of political parties on voting behaviour, using case studies from elections in Britain and other advanced democracies.

GV307-6-FY
Political Economy
(30 CREDITS)

This module is about modern political economy, meaning analytical approaches to study how economic and political incentives interact to create constraints and opportunities that shape larger political and economic behaviour and outcomes. The module introduces students to the use of rigorous logic and evidence in order to understand classical political economy issues as well as to address contemporary policy issues in both domestic and international dimensions.

GV312-6-AU
Domestic Politics and International Relations
(15 CREDITS)

How do interest groups influence the trajectory of a country's foreign policy? Who benefits and gains from globalisation and how does this affect their political beliefs? In this module you explore how domestic politics and interests influence government's decisions in the international arena, and how international politics affects domestic politics.

GV313-6-AU
Authoritarianism
(15 CREDITS)

Authoritarianism: This module examines authoritarianism, one of the biggest challenges to modern-day democracy. We start by defining autocracy and evaluating alternative measurements of regime type (dictatorship vs. democracy). We then examine the factors that drive politics in dictatorships and look at how these institutions explain the variation in autocratic government performance. Lastly, we consider the conditions under which regime failure (e.g., democratic transitions) are more likely to occur. GV313-SP, Corruption: This module examines corruption, a global problem that is present in dictatorships and democracies, in developing as well as more developed societies. At the extreme, corruption hampers economic development, reinforces social inequality, and undermines democratic development. We start by defining corruption and evaluating alternative measurements of corruption. We then examine the causes and consequences of political and bureaucratic corruption. Last, but not least, we consider existing strategies to contain and control this problem.

GV314-6-AU
International Political Economy
(15 CREDITS)

“Globalisation” encompasses a wide range of phenomena, including increasing global trade, deeper integration of financial markets, increasing foreign direct investment, the spread of multinational corporations, reduced travel, transportation and communication costs, and the emergence of global cultural trends. Globalisation impacts people in many different ways, both positively and negatively. It can enrich our lives, but it may also spur disruption and backlash.

GV315-6-SP
Political Economy of International Development
(15 CREDITS)

The problem of global poverty has come increasingly into focus in recent decades. This module explores the ways in which the wealthy countries of the world, international organizations, non-governmental organizations and civil society in the developing world have tried to catalyse or facilitate economic and human development in the poorer countries around the globe.

GV317-6-SP
Corruption
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you will examine corruption, a global problem that is present in dictatorships as well as democracies, in developing and more developed societies alike. In particular, you'll focus on the impact of corruption on democratic regimes. At the extreme, corruption hampers economic development, reinforces social inequality, and undermines democratic development generally. You will start by defining corruption and discuss alternative tools to evaluate the extent of corruption within a given polity. You'll then examine the causes and consequence of corruption (both political and bureaucratic). Last, but not least, you'll evaluate existing strategies to contain and control this problem.

GV369-6-SP
American Political Institutions
(15 CREDITS)

The American political system is composed of a complicated set of relationships between several different institutions of government.  In this module, we’ll explore how each of the institutions was designed and ask if the design of the American system still functions as intended by the Framers of the Constitution.  Additionally, we discuss what changes have occurred in terms of institutional relationships and what changes are necessary to promote a healthy democracy and a political engaged citizenry.

GV374-6-FY
Democracy and the Media
(30 CREDITS)

The relationship between the media and politics is a complex and important means by which the public are informed on and engaged by political activity. You consider the role of the media and democracy in the UK, and also explore how this functions elsewhere.

GV383-6-AU
German Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that institution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV383-6-FY
German Politics
(30 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that institution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV383-6-SP
German Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that institution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV385-6-SP
Parliamentary Studies
(15 CREDITS)

This module aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of how the UK Parliament works (in both theory and practice). Subject to validation, this module is co-taught by staff at the Houses of Parliament and has the support of The Speaker and the Clerk of the House in the House of Commons, and the Lord Speaker and the Clerk of the Parliaments in the House of Lords. The module content is delivered collaboratively by the Houses of Parliament and the University of Essex, with the University providing academic and theoretical content and Parliament providing practical and vocational teaching about the work, processes and business of Parliament.

GV505-6-AU
Political Psychology
(15 CREDITS)
GV508-6-SP
The Analysis of Conflict and Peace
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the relationship of power, preferences, economic relations, domestic politics and international organisations in relation to conflict and peace. You investigate the underlying theoretical arguments about war and peace, consider the implications entailed by these different theories, and evaluate these using empirical data.

GV510-6-AU
Democracy, Violence, and Inequality in Latin America
(15 CREDITS)

What are the challenges to democracy in Latin America and how do they prevent democratic consolidation? Gain an introduction to the politics of Latin America and explore the significant challenges to democratic consolidation throughout the region. This module will enable you to be better prepared to tackle complex and important political, economic, and social questions in this dynamic region of the world.

GV517-6-AU
International Security Studies
(15 CREDITS)

The field of security studies has become increasingly important over the last decade. While old conflicts are reigniting and new ones are emerging, scholars and decision-makers debate about changes to the concepts of security, the redundancy of military force, and the centrality of the state in order to face these ever-important issues.

GV517-6-FY
International Security Studies
(30 CREDITS)

The field of security studies has become increasingly important over the last decade. While old conflicts are reigniting and new ones are emerging, scholars and decision-makers debate about changes to the concepts of security, the redundancy of military force, and the centrality of the state in order to face these ever-important issues.

GV522-6-SP
Gender and Armed Conflict
(15 CREDITS)

War narratives and studies of political violence have traditionally focused on the roles and actions of men. Women have typically been framed as innocent bystanders and victims. Yet, women often actively participate in civil wars and in terrorist campaigns, either as civilian supporters of these groups or as armed fighters. In addition to acknowledging the profound impact that civil conflicts have on women, this course explores the many important roles that women often play in terrorist and rebel organizations and examines women's potential contributions to post-war peace building and conflict resolution. The objective of the course is that you will gain a better understanding of the roles women play in the production and resolution of political violence and the manner in which gender and gender attitudes influence war and armed conflict.

GV523-6-AU
The Politics of Modern China
(15 CREDITS)

This module focuses on the politics of the People's Republic of China, with an emphasis on the contemporary effects of the political and economic transitions that occurred during the Reform Era. The purpose of the module is to provide a working knowledge and critical lens for understanding how and why political events and change are occurring in modern China. This module highlights a comparative approach to Chinese politics that seeks to understand how the Chinese case can inform and be informed by existing empirical methods and theories of politics and government.

GV524-6-AU
Gender and Leadership
(15 CREDITS)

This module focuses on the role of women in diverse global leadership positions, including how gender roles and norms have affected the integration and advancement of women in business and governmental organizations. Following an introduction to theories and literature of gender and leadership roles, you will address the empirical record of gender issues in the business, government and international security realms. You will conclude with an evaluation of whether and how gendered leadership leads to distinct policy outcomes and political deliberative processes.

GV525-6-SP
Introduction to Israeli Politics
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you’ll gain an introduction to the domestic politics of Israel in a comparative perspective, including issues of internal cultural diversity, religion and politics, fragmentation of the political party system, and coalition governance. You’ll explore political institutions, parties, and voting behaviour in Israel, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the state of Israel as a democratic country, understand the Israeli political structure, and discuss the electoral arena.

GV526-6-AU
Politics of South Asia
(15 CREDITS)

Almost a quarter of the world’s population resides in South Asia, making it a region that is both densely populated and extremely diverse in ethno-linguistic, social and political terms, on the one hand. On the other hand, a majority of its eight countries share a colonial past and many political institutions, on paper. In this module, you’ll focus on the politics of this complex region, with an emphasis on themes related to political institutions, democratic and autocratic tendencies, civil-military relations, and the role of various social identities in shaping and influencing the political outcomes we see in the region.

GV537-6-FY
State Fragility, State Building and Conflict
(30 CREDITS)

How does state fragility influence the risk of conflict and terrorism? How does the legacy of conflict and violence influence post-conflict state building? What factors promote a durable peace? Study the interplay between state fragility, political and economic development, state building, and conflict.

GV538-6-SP
From Cradle to Grave: Social Justice in Childhood, Adulthood, and Death
(15 CREDITS)

Theories of justice are still being worked on and developed today. You question contemporary theories of justice through applying them to some of the most controversial issues dominating contemporary politics.

GV543-6-AU
Human Rights and Global Justice
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the nature and foundations of international obligations. It asks what we owe to people in other countries, and what they can demand of us as a matter of right. Questions to be addressed include the following: Who owes what to the very poor? Are citizens of affluent countries complicit in the creation and maintenance of world poverty? Does justice demand the elimination of global inequality? Is the promotion of human rights a form of western cultural imperialism? When is international trade unfair? Do states have a right to close their borders to outsiders? Under what conditions (if any) is it permissible to wage war? We will address these questions by considering the answers that they have received in important recent works of normative political theory.

GV591-6-AU
Domestic Environmental Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values, to the environmental movement, to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV591-6-FY
Environmental Politics
(30 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values, to the environmental movement, to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV591-6-SP
Environmental Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values, to the environmental movement, to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV831-6-FY
Research Project: Politics
(30 CREDITS)

Prepare a 10,000 word dissertation which researches the political topic you are most passionate about.

PY402-6-SP
Kierkegaard
(15 CREDITS)

his module introduces the work of the 19thcentury Danish thinker, Søren Kierkegaard, against the background of debates around ‘the crisis of modernity’. Topics covered include: melancholy, boredom, the limits of reason, subjectivity and truth.

PY413-6-SP
Contemporary Political Philosophy
(15 CREDITS)

How should theory and theorists relate to real politics? What are the competing approaches in contemporary philosophy?

PY418-6-SP
Philosophy of Mind
(15 CREDITS)

What is the mind? In this module, you consider different ways of conceiving the distinction between the mental and the non-mental, the nature of consciousness, the nature and structure of mental content or representation, the relation between reasoning and consciousness, how the body shapes the mind, the nature of the self and self-awareness, and many other fascinating issues. As you study these topics, you will also learn about a variety of classic and contemporary Analytic and phenomenological approaches to the mind.

PY426-6-SP
Philosophy Dissertation
(15 CREDITS)

Develop your research and written skills through writing a dissertation on a philosophical topic studied in either your second year or the autumn term of your final year.

PY427-6-SP
Topics in the Philosophy of Religion
(15 CREDITS)

What is Islamic philosophy? How did early Muslim thinkers adapt and develop the insights of ancient Greek philosophers? How did Islamic philosophers approach issues such as free will, the good life, sexuality or the role of women? Why are the answers to some of these questions so different from what many people today might assume?

PY428-6-AU
Philosophy and Medical Ethics
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the philosophical questions that are raised by everyday medical practice and recent developments in medical science. You consider topics including suicide, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, reproductive medicine, resource allocation, medical research, confidentiality, patient autonomy, and biopolitics.

PY453-6-AU
Feminism
(15 CREDITS)

How and why are women oppressed? What is a “woman”, and should we even use the term? This module will look at some of the main strands in modern feminist theory, and explore the different ways in which they understand the nature, role and objectives of feminism. Along the way, we will discuss the intersection between gender and other axes of oppression, such as race and class.

PY454-6-AU
Phenomenology and Existentialism
(15 CREDITS)

Existentialism encompasses a variety of different thinkers unified by a.) the belief that human existence cannot be fully understood using the categories provided by the philosophical tradition or the natural sciences, and b.) a commitment to taking seriously the first-person quality of experience as it is lived. For this reason Existentialism has close ties to Phenomenology, which is a philosophical methodology defined by its insistence on examining meaning as it is experienced first-personally in order to uncover the structures governing the possibility of those meaningful experiences. In this module we will closely study one or more of the leading figures of these two inter-related philosophical movements. In 2021-2022, we will focus on Emmanuel Levinas’ major work, Totality and Infinity.

PY500-6-AU
Kant's Revolution in Philosophy
(15 CREDITS)

Kant's Critique of Pure Reason initiates a new 'critical' method in philosophy which has been highly influential in both continental and analytic philosophy. His critical method establishes a new way of thinking about the relation in which we stand to the world, and the role played by knowledge and judgement within that world.

SC340-6-FY
The Current Issues in Social Science
(30 CREDITS)

This module gives students an opportunity to apply social science to address key issues facing society at the local, national and global level. For example, what is the impact of the war in Yemen or in Syria? What is the impact of Brexit? How does global warming affect us? What are the major challenges in the 21st century? This module will tackle a different theme each term to better understand how Social Science can be used to understand the big issues.

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