Clearing 2021
MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Language Studies and Linguistics options

Year 2, Component 04

Linguistics option from list
LG210-5-SP
Phonology
(15 CREDITS)

Continuing from LG110, you will build on your existing knowledge, reinforcing the cognitive aspect of spoken language, the way in which sounds combine to make up words, and the interaction between word formation and phonology, as well as phonology in the wider context of phrases. The theory you learn throughout this module can be used to analyse other languages.

LG211-5-SP
Semantics and Pragmatics
(15 CREDITS)

What is 'meaning' as it relates to words and sentences? How is the meaning of a sentence affected by the context it is produced in? These are the fundamental issues you will address in this module. You will examine the relationship between what is said and what is meant, with the first part of the course looking at basic issues in Semantics. The second part of the course will examine the distinction between a speaker's words and what a speaker means by those words – the domain of pragmatics.

LG212-5-AU
Syntax
(15 CREDITS)

Build on analytical concepts introduced in your first year, and investigate a range of key grammatical constructions in English. With an emphasis on description, rather than a particular theoretical approach, this practically orientated module will provide you with a solid foundation for tackling more theoretical options in English linguistics. As well as gaining an understanding of key areas of English grammar and grammatical terminology, you will also equip yourself with analytical, data, and evaluation skills.

LG213-5-SP
Research methods for language and linguistics
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the steps involved in undertaking a research project in language and linguistics and develop your own final-year project. Topics include: Reviewing literature; Formulating research questions and hypotheses; Choosing a suitable research design; Data collection; Analysis techniques; Reporting findings. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, seminars and lab sessions to build your knowledge, skills, and confidence in researching, structuring, and writing a research project.

LG215-5-SP
Psycholinguistics
(15 CREDITS)

How do we receive and recognise speech? How are words and concepts stored in our mind? Building on your knowledge of Psycholinguistics gained in earlier modules, the focus of this module is on language processing. You will study how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. Topics covered include visual and auditory recognition of words, sentence comprehension, sentence production, language acquisition, and the neural representation of language. You will also have the opportunity to gain some practical experience with the elaboration of a research poster.

LG217-5-AU
Phonetics
(15 CREDITS)

Building on your knowledge gained in earlier modules, the focus of this module is on the phonetics involved in the pronunciation of English and the relationship between phonetics and phonology to offer explanations for some observed phenomena. As part of your studies, you will cover both articulatory and acoustic phonetics.

LG218-5-AU
Sociolinguistics
(15 CREDITS)

The aim of this module is to examine language variation according to social, contextual and linguistic factors. You will look at how language is actually used, how people feel about it, and how the two are often opposed – including how the structure of language interacts with both. You will consider language as a resource to convey cultural and personal identity, and what it reveals of language attitudes and social structure, and therefore of status and inequality in areas such as social class, gender, age, and ethnicity. You will explore how social identity illuminates variation in language, and cover topics such as regional and social dialects, language rights, and language variation and change.

LG219-5-SP
Multilingualism
(15 CREDITS)

This module covers topics in multilingualism and language contact. First, you will look at multilingualism at the level of the individual and cover topics such as language choice, diglossia, and code-switching. You will then consider multilingualism at the societal level and look at the outcomes of language contact. This will involve exploring the coexistence of more than one language within the same community and the issues that arise as a result including language maintenance and shift, the plight of minority and endangered languages and the emergence of Pidgin and Creole languages.

LG222-5-SP
English Language in the media
(15 CREDITS)

Interested in how people make use of social media to construct identities for themselves? Curious about how media is used to disseminate political messages? Explore how language is used for different purposes within and across a range of mass and social media. Through this module you’ll examine how language is used in such contexts as electronically-mediated communication (EMC), political speeches, interviews and mass media more broadly.

LG329-5-AU
Language Teaching in Different Contexts
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the different contexts language teachers find themselves in and how this affects teaching practice and course structures. You learn how to develop and enhance materials and appropriate activities in order to get the best from your students.y learning.

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