Clearing 2021
MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Liberal Arts options

Year 1, Component 03

Option(s) from list: Different discipline
AR117-4-SP
Collect, Curate, Display: A Short History of the Museum
(15 CREDITS)

This module offers an introduction to the history of museums and galleries. We will consider the basic human instinct to collect and the creation of the first museums. We will examine ideas about taxonomy, ordering the world and the first museum spaces of display, asking questions about privilege and power. How have museums and galleries shaped history and science? What ethical issues are there today around these spaces? Should tobacco, oil and arms companies sponsor museums? Can museums be tools of ‘urban regeneration’? Do online archives and 3D scanning make museums themselves obsolete institutions?

AR119-4-AU
Art and Ideas: I
(15 CREDITS)

This module tackles some of the biggest questions surrounding the history of art. You will explore some key issues of philosophical aesthetics, such as the nature of representation, by engaging critically with seminal texts, artworks, and architecture. In this module, you will develop your analytical and interpretive skills, and leave with a solid foundation for the study of the history of art.

AR120-4-SP
Space, Place and Locality
(15 CREDITS)

Learn about the history of architecture and the relationship between spaces and those who inhabit them. This module is intended to serve as an introduction to architectural history, as well as concepts of visual culture, urbanism, and critical theories of space.

AR121-4-AU
Art Revolutions
(15 CREDITS)

Realism and Impressionism. Meet the rule-breakers. What is it that motivates an artist to break the mould? Focussing on Realism and Impressionism in France, this module identifies not only how the political, social and economic changes during the nineteenth century affected art and creative thinking, but how this vibrant and multi-faceted group of artists, who refused to follow the crowd, influenced their world. Through analysis of primary and secondary sources, you’ll explore their historical reputation, as well as their relevance today.

AR123-4-SP
Introduction to Heritage Studies
(15 CREDITS)

This module provides an introductory overview to the field of heritage and museum studies and explores some of the conceptual, political and ethical issues faced by those working within and researching in the area of heritage and museums. The module defines heritage, discusses how heritage is officially recognised, and presents the instruments that are used to interpret, protect, and communicate heritage, at local, national, and international levels. It also introduces the main aspects of museum studies, explains how the definitions of museums has changed through time and how this definition affects how we preserve and present heritage today. This module will introduce you to the history of heritage and museum management and will lay the foundation of some of the conceptual, political and ethical issues of the heritage and the museum field. It defines heritage as a process in which people makes sense of the past, in the present and for the future and how the aims of heritage and museum management changes according to the heritage process and its contexts.

BE100-4-FY
Introduction to Accounting
(30 CREDITS)

Accounting has a lot to do with numbers, however it isn’t just about keeping track of money coming into and out of a firm. In this introductory module you’ll discuss the true nature and role of accounting and will consider who uses accounting information and for what purpose. You’ll also be introduced to the role of regulation in governing accounting practice. This module provides essential skills and information you need to know whether you want to become an accountant, be a manager or start your own company.

BE400-4-FY
Introduction to Management and Marketing
(30 CREDITS)

When studying management and marketing you’ll often find out that it is all about people. An organisation isn’t made up of buildings and equipment, but of individual people. In this introductory module you’ll consider a wide variety of important management issues, and in line with our Essex beliefs, you’ll consider ethical implications and the responsibilities which organsiations have to society and other stakeholders. You’ll also begin to consider how there may be significant gaps between management theory and real life.

CS101-4-FY
Modern Revolutions in Science, Politics, and Culture
(30 CREDITS)

Certain ideas shape the way we see ourselves and the world around us - ideas like democracy, free speech, individualism, free markets, and human rights. These ideas took their definitive modern form during a politically and intellectually revolutionary stretch of history known as the Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1800). This interdisciplinary module examines this period and thus serves as an essential prerequisite for students who want to understand the intellectual currents that run through the world they live in. Graduating students often rank it among the most useful modules they have taken.

CS111-4-AU
The World Transformed: The Enlightenment and Its Critics
(15 CREDITS)

Ours is a world that seems to be shaking at its very foundations. Ideas that have shaped the way we see ourselves and the world around us – ideas like democracy, free speech, citizenship, political authority, individualism, free markets, and human rights – are contested at every turn. These ideas took their definitive modern form during a period of political and intellectual upheaval known as the Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1800). If we want to navigate our way through the chaos of today, then we need to return to the roots of our contemporary world – the Enlightenment. This interdisciplinary module explores this revolutionary period so that we can better understand our world today and bring about the world we want tomorrow. We will focus on political revolutions, on societal inequality, sickness, and control, and the dark side of technology. Graduating students often rank it among the most useful modules they've taken.

CS111-4-SP
The World Transformed: The Enlightenment and Its Critics
(15 CREDITS)

Ours is a world that seems to be shaking at its very foundations. Ideas that have shaped the way we see ourselves and the world around us – ideas like democracy, free speech, citizenship, political authority, individualism, free markets, and human rights – are contested at every turn. These ideas took their definitive modern form during a period of political and intellectual upheaval known as the Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1800). If we want to navigate our way through the chaos of today, then we need to return to the roots of our contemporary world – the Enlightenment. This interdisciplinary module explores this revolutionary period so that we can better understand our world today and bring about the world we want tomorrow. We will focus on political revolutions, on societal inequality, sickness, and control, and the dark side of technology. Graduating students often rank it among the most useful modules they've taken.

CS141-4-SP
Contemporary Challenges in Latin America
(15 CREDITS)

What impact has migration had on Latin America in recent years? And what about the drug trade? Or climate change? Study the contemporary topics that have shaped Latin America in the last thirty years, drawing on interdisciplinary research as well as creative work by Latin American artists, writers and film-makers.

CS143-4-AU
Colonialism to Revolution: Power and Politics in Latin America
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the rich and fascinating history of Latin America and the Caribbean. On this module you will explore key political and social events, from pre-Columbian civilisations up to the Cuban Revolution.

CS220-4-AU
Navigating the Digital World
(15 CREDITS)

What does it mean to be a "digital citizen"? How are digital technologies transforming society? To what extent do digital technologies curb or enhance our rights? Some say that we live in a "post-truth" era filled with "fake news" that traps us in a digital "bubble" or "echo chamber". Others see digital technologies as the key to unlocking social change and finding new ways to bring people together across geographical boundaries. Which view is right? What are the actual legal, ethical, social, political, creative, and economic implications of living in an increasingly digital world? This module gives you an opportunity to explore these important issues, and it also provides you with hands-on training from experts in the practical skills required to navigate the digital world.

CS220-4-FY
Navigating the Digital World
(30 CREDITS)

What does it mean to be a "digital citizen"? How are digital technologies transforming society? To what extent do digital technologies curb or enhance our rights? Some say that we live in a "post-truth" era filled with "fake news" that traps us in a digital "bubble" or "echo chamber". Others see digital technologies as the key to unlocking social change and finding new ways to bring people together across geographical boundaries. Which view is right? What are the actual legal, ethical, social, political, creative, and economic implications of living in an increasingly digital world? This module gives you an opportunity to explore these important issues, and it also provides you with hands-on training from experts in the practical skills required to navigate the digital world.

CS220-4-SP
Navigating the Digital World
(15 CREDITS)

What does it mean to be a "digital citizen"? How are digital technologies transforming society? To what extent do digital technologies curb or enhance our rights? Some say that we live in a "post-truth" era filled with "fake news" that traps us in a digital "bubble" or "echo chamber". Others see digital technologies as the key to unlocking social change and finding new ways to bring people together across geographical boundaries. Which view is right? What are the actual legal, ethical, social, political, creative, and economic implications of living in an increasingly digital world? This module gives you an opportunity to explore these important issues, and it also provides you with hands-on training from experts in the practical skills required to navigate the digital world.

EC100-4-FY
Economics for Business
(30 CREDITS)

Join experts from our Department of Economics for your essential introduction to economics that business managers and leaders need to know. How are firms organised? What are the economic implications of this? And how does it affect the markets in which they operate? Develop an understanding of the central concepts of economics, then learn how to apply these principles to economic problems.

EC111-4-FY
Introduction to Economics
(30 CREDITS)

How do consumers make decisions? Or firms conduct different market strategies? What impact does government policy have on inflation? Or unemployment? Develop your knowledge of economics in relation to a range of contemporary issues. Learn how to apply both micro and macroeconomic principles to the analysis of such problems.

EC114-4-FY
Introduction to Quantitative Economics
(30 CREDITS)

What are the main sources of economic data? And how is data used in economics? Study the methods of quantitative economics, looking at how economic data is described and analysed. Learn to read, understand and manipulate data from both a theoretical and empirical perspective.

EC115-4-FY
Methods of Economic Analysis
(30 CREDITS)

What mathematical techniques are required for a modern economics degree? Do you have the mathematical tools to attack economic problems? If you are worried that your mathematical background could hold you back, then learn the mathematical skills needed when studying problems of economic interest.

EC116-4-FY
Applied Economics and Policy
(30 CREDITS)

How do economists interpret data? How can we test relationships suggested by economic theory? How do we use economic theories to analyse real world issues? This module helps you to understand simple and commonly used statistical and econometric techniques, and important software for applied economics. You learn how data can be used to analyse real world economic problems.

EC120-4-FY
The World Economy in Historical Perspective
(30 CREDITS)

Why did industrialisation first occur in Europe, not China or India? How did economic growth lead to the Industrial Revolution? What impact did two world wars have on the global economy? Explore the process of economic change and development from the sixteenth-century to the present day.

GV100-4-FY
Introduction to Politics
(30 CREDITS)

What is “Politics”? How have people conceived of political analysis, the state, laws, wars and political parties, across cultures and over time? Gain an understanding of essential concepts in the study of politics and explore the economic, social and intellectual trends that have made democracy possible.

GV103-4-AU
Introduction to International Relations
(15 CREDITS)

This module introduces students to the study of international relations, with a particular emphasis on two broad fields: international security and international political economy. Topics in international security include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, the causes of war and peace, terrorism, international institutions, and human rights. Topics in international political economy include trade, finance, European integration, the origins of underdevelopment, government responses to disasters, and foreign aid. Throughout the class, students are encouraged to apply theoretical concepts to real world events.

GV110-4-SP
Thinking Like a Social Scientist
(15 CREDITS)

What constitutes a good piece of research? You consider the basics of scientific work and procedures in the social sciences in order to understand the philosophy and theory of social scientific investigations, and to improve your research throughout your degree.

GV113-4-SP
Co-Operation and Conflict
(15 CREDITS)

Why do states sometimes go to war? What conditions can promote peace and international stability? When are states able to form cooperative agreements to promote trade, combat terrorism, or address climate change? Explore issues in international relations which help address complicated questions concerning cooperation and conflict between countries.

GV120-4-AU
Politics and Economic Policies
(15 CREDITS)

Voters, in theory, should shape economic policy. But in practice, this is often determined by the preferences of politicians and private market forces, both legal and illegal. You develop an understanding of the beliefs, incentives and behaviour of political actors which explain the link between political processes and economic policy.

GV121-4-SP
Institutions of Democracy
(15 CREDITS)

What rules affect political action? You explore how institutions and the rules they enforce, for example voting under a specific electoral system, affect political and economic outcomes, and whether these are ultimately only second-best solutions to collective action.

GV150-4-SP
Politics and Power
(15 CREDITS)

Study some fundamental texts in the “Western” philosophical tradition. We examine the assumptions underlying these texts, as well as the implications they have for us today. We explore profound themes of justice, equality, freedom, democracy, liberalism, republicanism, the meanings of gender and labour, and mass society and the individual.

GV151-4-AU
Truth, Justice, and The Nature of Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Study some fundamental texts in the “Western” philosophical tradition. We examine the assumptions underlying these texts, as well as the implications they have for us today. We explore profound themes of truth, justice, equality, freedom, democracy, liberalism, republicanism, and morality.

GV163-4-AU
Introduction to United States
(15 CREDITS)

American politics have long dominated the global stage; these are crucial times for the study of the United States. Discuss policymaking and contemporary political events in order to gain a basic introduction to the politics and government of the United States.

GV420-4-AU
The Impact of Disease and Disaster
(15 CREDITS)

How does disease and disaster affect society and the state? How can states and societies can respond and be resilient? In this module, you’ll look at the economic, social, psychological and political implications and responses to disease and disaster from an inter-disciplinary perspective and examine how states build capacity and the importance of state -societal, and interpersonal trust.

GV422-4-SP
Resilience to Disease and Disaster
(15 CREDITS)
HR100-4-FY
The Making of the Modern World since 1750
(30 CREDITS)

Gain a deep insight into the origins of today’s world. This module presents a chronological overview of the key events in western history from the last 200 years. Look at how ideas, cultures, and economies of different peoples intersected, and changed, through the conflicts brought on by capitalism, imperialism, war, and revolution. You develop a solid foundation to study modern history.

HR101-4-AU
Becoming a Historian
(15 CREDITS)

Gain the necessary tools with which to study history at university level. You will be introduced to history as an academic discipline and will develop the skills employed by professional historians, as well as gaining key transferable skills. This module has no single geographical focus, but uses examples from a range of different historical themes, time periods and countries.

HR104-4-SP
Resisting Empire
(15 CREDITS)

The rise and fall of the various historical empires--the Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, British and others--is a familiar story, but that is not the focus of this module. Instead, we will examine the many ways in which people across the globe opposed imperial domination (broadly construed), with special attention to the campaigns, both violent and non-violent, that contested and ultimately helped to alter the old world order. We will see that although many of these movements were crushed, empires were far from invincible and always faced opposition. At the heart of the module will be a set of case studies ranging from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, with examples from the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Africa.

HR106-4-SP
People and Power: A History of Democracy in Modern Europe
(15 CREDITS)

Democracy cannot be taken for granted. There was a long way to modern parliamentary democracy and universal suffrage. Evolution of existing systems, revolutions, and wars created what is generally called Western Democracy. This module will explore the development of democracy in Europe over the last 200 years. It will examine how democratic states were established, challenged and reborn from the early nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. Europe experienced dictatorships, two World Wars and the fall of the Iron curtain in this time period, but it also saw the expansion of citizenship and civil liberties, the establishment of parliamentary democracies on a global scale and the emergence of the welfare states with greater social provisions for its populations. The module will also investigate the crisis of the welfare state, the rise of Neo-Liberalism, and the rise of populism--all challenges to democratic systems in the past and today.

HR111-4-FY
Europe Transformed: 1450-1750
(30 CREDITS)

This is the early modern period, a span of around 300 years often regarded by historians as a time of change and a watershed between the medieval and modern worlds. Gain an understanding of this important time by looking at Europe in economic, social, cultural and political contexts. Study the patterns of continuity and change which shaped this period, and reflect on the extent to which the Europe we live in today has been conditioned by these 300 years.

HR162-4-AU
The Great American Experiment
(15 CREDITS)

Gain a firm grasp of US history by studying key historical events as well as important social movements. Topics covered range from the early settlements in Plimoth and Jamestown, through the American Revolution and expansion, Industrial Revolution, slavery and Civil War, up to the 1950s and 60s civil rights, women's and youth movements. Engage with novel and exciting debate about the history of the United States.

HU100-4-FY
Foundations of Human Rights
(30 CREDITS)

What are human rights? How do we protect them? And what challenges do we face when promoting human rights on an international level? Discover the fundamental principles and practices, including topics related to international law and philosophy, which underpin the protection and promotion of our human rights.

LA121-4-AU
Intensive Initial French 1
(15 CREDITS)

This module is for students with little or no knowledge of French. It is an interactive and intensive language module which uses various strategies for fast paced progress through the French language. It explores both the communicative and the structural aspects of the French language.

LA122-4-SP
Intensive Initial French 2
(15 CREDITS)

Continuing on from French Intensive Initial 1, this is an interactive and intensive language module for those who have little or no knowledge of French. It explores both the communicative and the structural aspects of the French language.

LA130-4-FY
Higher Intermediate French
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your French comprehension? Improve your spoken and written language skills? Sharpen your grammatical accuracy? Make use of a range of materials to further advance your language abilities, building coherent and cohesive skills for both speaking and writing in French.

LA140-4-FY
Advanced French
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in French? Develop your university-level French language skills, improving your aural comprehension while boosting your grammar knowledge and vocabulary. Learn to appreciate, summarise and evaluate a piece of text. Expand your understanding of French culture and society.

LA221-4-AU
Intensive Initial German 1
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn German from scratch? Study the German language from basic to advanced level, so that you can communicate in complex situations and read extended texts, like newspaper articles. Learn how to give short talks or presentations in German and be able to write German coherently.

LA222-4-SP
Intensive Initial German 2
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn German from scratch? Study the German language from basic to advanced level, so that you can communicate in complex situations and read extended texts, like newspaper articles. Learn how to give short talks or presentations in German and be able to write German coherently.

LA230-4-FY
Higher Intermediate German
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your German comprehension? Improve your spoken and written language skills? Sharpen your grammatical accuracy? Learn to master complex situations in German and how to deal with extended texts, like newspaper articles. Advance your language abilities, building coherent and cohesive skills for both speaking and writing in German.

LA240-4-FY
Advanced German
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in German? Develop your university-level German language skills so that you are fairly fluent with the ability understand spoken and written work. Be able to express yourself orally and in writing on demanding topics that face modern Germany.

LA333-4-FY
Spanish / Italian / Romanian to Portuguese Conversion
(30 CREDITS)

Have you knowledge of Spanish, Italian or Romanian? Do you want to speak Portuguese too? Develop advanced written, aural/oral and reading skills, as well as build your knowledge of Brazilian/Portuguese culture and society. Learn to understand short texts, be able to write letters and interact in everyday situations in Portuguese.

LA340-4-FY
Advanced Portuguese
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in Portuguese? Develop your language abilities, expanding your vocabulary and improving your listening and oral skills. Expand your understanding of the Portuguese-speaking culture and history through the use of texts, films and online resources.

LA410-4-FY
Initial Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

To whom do you say “¿Cómo estás?” And to whom do you say “¿Cómo están?” Gain the basic linguistic skills to enjoy a visit to Spain. Learn the dialogue, structures and tenses needed for everyday situations, and develop the writing skills required for short messages.

LA420-4-FY
Lower Intermediate Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want to improve your Spanish? Need a chance to focus on difficult areas of Spanish for English speakers? Further your language abilities by undertaking practice of oral skills. Learn to produce written work in Spanish. Expand your Spanish so that you can incorporate more sophisticated structure in your communication.

LA421-4-AU
Intensive Initial Spanish 1
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Spanish from scratch? And spend four weeks abroad during the summer? Build your language abilities, so you can read short stories or novels in Spanish, as well as articulate your ideas verbally or in writing. Undertake a research project, in Spanish, on a topic of your choosing.

LA422-4-SP
(See LA421)
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Spanish from scratch? And spend four weeks abroad during the summer? Build your language abilities, so you can read short stories or novels in Spanish, as well as articulate your ideas verbally or in writing. Undertake a research project, in Spanish, on a topic of your choosing.

LA430-4-FY
Higher Intermediate Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your Spanish comprehension? Improve your spoken and written language skills? Sharpen your grammatical accuracy? Study topics related to Hispanic culture, starting with text to improve vocabulary and grammar, then undertaking related listening and speaking activities. Build coherent and cohesive skills for both speaking and writing in Spanish.

LA440-4-FY
Advanced Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in Spanish? Develop your language abilities, expanding your vocabulary and improving your listening and oral skills. Expand your understanding of Spanish and Latin American culture and history through the use of texts, films and conversations with native speakers.

LA621-4-AU
Intensive Initial Italian 1
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Italian from scratch? Reach A-level Italian standard, gaining understanding of Italian language structure and functions. Take part in a variety of class activities, including individual and group work, to build your Italian communication skills.

LA622-4-SP
Intensive Initial Italian 2
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Italian from scratch? Reach A-level Italian standard, gaining understanding of Italian language structure and functions. Take part in a variety of class activities, including individual and group work, to build your Italian communication skills.

LA630-4-FY
Higher Intermediate Italian
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your Italian comprehension? Improve your spoken and listening language skills? Be able to communicate effectively with native speakers? Study a range of topics and a variety of texts to build your spoken Italian and reading abilities.

LA640-4-FY
Advanced Italian
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in Italian? Develop your language abilities, expanding your vocabulary and improving your listening and oral skills. Improve your Italian understanding through reading, analysing and discussing topics in class. Build your awareness of spoken Italian through activities in our multimedia lab.

LA921-4-AU
Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 1
(15 CREDITS)
LA922-4-SP
Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 2
(15 CREDITS)
LA930-4-FY
Higher Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
(30 CREDITS)
LG110-4-AU
Sounds
(15 CREDITS)

This module introduces you to the production of language sounds and their distribution in words, in particular, but not exclusively, in English. You will study the basic principles of phonology and develop the knowledge required to understand and begin to analyse sound systems. You will also discuss phonological processes and investigate the context and motivation of occurrence.

LG111-4-AU
Words and Sentences
(15 CREDITS)

Discover how to describe and analyse the structure of words, phrases, and sentences in this introductory half module. With topics including the English parts of speech, word structure and the distinction between inflection, derivation and compounding, and the identification of phrases, you will gain a solid grasp of the foundational material for the study of English linguistics, whilst developing useful analytical skills.

LG113-4-SP
Understanding Data in Linguistics
(15 CREDITS)

Develop three important skills for your future studies in this mixture of lecture and lab sessions: Tools of the trade – brush up on your ICT skills; Presentational skills – get to grips with talking in front of an audience as well as presenting written ideas; Analytical skills – refine your analytical skills for academic and non-academic work. By the time you’ve completed this module, you will be equipped with a skill set will see you through your studies and beyond.

LG114-4-SP
Foundations of Sociolinguistics
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the role of variation in language systems, and learn the techniques and concepts needed to study the way language varies. You will look at geographical, social and historical dialects, explore language myths, and cover topics such as measuring language variation, social patterns and functions of language variation, speaker variables, and the relationship of language variation to language change. At the end of this module, you will have gained a clear understanding of the role variation plays in language systems, and will be able to look critically at the social functions and values of dialects and vernacular language usage.

LG115-4-AU
Child Language Development
(15 CREDITS)

Gain a thorough overview of key concepts, methods, and theoretical approaches in research on language development throughout the lifespan. Investigate monolingual and bilingual child language acquisition, second language acquisition, language loss, and the attrition of the first language in second language learners, by looking at a broad range of studies, including ongoing studies from the Centre for Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), at the University of Essex.

LG116-4-SP
Adult Language Development and Processing
(15 CREDITS)

How are words organised in our brain? How do we understand sentences? What is the relationship between language, music, and the brain? Find the answers to these questions by taking a critical look at findings from a broad range of studies, whilst learning about key concepts, methods, and theoretical approaches in research on language processing.

LT109-4-SP
Contemporary Texts and Contexts
(15 CREDITS)

What is contemporary writing? And how is it characterised? Don’t just study known “traditional” genres of literature, what about the emerging new genres of writing that are challenging readers? Analyse contemporary English writing, published within the last ten years, looking at themes, forms, issues and language.

LT121-4-FY
Approaches to Film and Media
(30 CREDITS)

How do we analyse moving images? What innovations have transformed the cinema experience? What moments and movements have been key to film history? Study the development of international cinema, looking at all aspects of the form, including analysis of theoretical issues, film language, and a variety of important directors and genres.

LT123-4-FY
Contemporary Television
(30 CREDITS)
LT137-4-AU
The First World War in Literature
(15 CREDITS)
LT151-4-AU
Global Shakespeare on Film
(15 CREDITS)
LT161-4-SP
Introduction to United States Literature
(15 CREDITS)

What is US literature? What makes it different from other writing in the English language, particularly work from the UK? Study classic texts that have established US literature as a distinct tradition in itself and gain an understanding of the issues surrounding this.

LT171-4-SP
Introduction to European Literature
(15 CREDITS)

This module is an introduction to some of the most influential European writers from the Enlightenment period up to the present day. You study significant works of literature that sparked particular movements or represent crucial literary innovation. The works selected are novels, novellas, short stories and plays, and we examine these texts within their historical and political contexts. This module will help you to build understanding of the development of genres, forms, styles, content and ideas.

LT182-4-AU
Text Up Close: Reading for Criticism
(15 CREDITS)

How do you read a text closely? What is involved in close reading? With emphasis on you to active do the close reading, learn how this approach can contribute to your appreciation of meaning and significance in a diverse range of texts.

LT191-4-AU
The Writer's Toolkit
(15 CREDITS)

How do you get started as a writer? How do you practise your writing? And how can you make improvements? Using exercises and texts, focus on your basic skills and essay writing. Cover topics like characterisation, dialogue, point of view, plotting, suspense, and metaphor and imagery.

LT705-4-SP
The Humanities Graduate: Future Pathways
(15 CREDITS)
MA108-4-SP
Statistics I
(15 CREDITS)

How do you apply the addition rule of probability? Or construct appropriate diagrams to illustrate data sets? Learn the basics of probability (combinatorial analysis and axioms of probability), conditional probability and independence, and probability distributions. Understand how to handle data using descriptive statistics and gain experience of R software.

MA114-4-AU
Matrices and Complex Numbers
(15 CREDITS)

Can you perform simple operations on complex numbers? How do you solve systems of linear equations using row operations? Can you calculate the determinant and inverse of a matrix? Understand the basics of linear algebra, with an emphasis on vectors and matrices.

MA125-4-SP
Mathematical Skills
(15 CREDITS)

Want to develop your mathematical skills by solving problems that are varied in nature and difficulty? Keen to write mathematical arguments that explain why your calculations are answer a question? Examine problem-solving techniques for situations across mathematics, including calculus, algebra, combinatorics, geometry and mechanics.

PA108-4-SP
Popular Film, Literature and Television: A Psychoanalytic Approach (Freud and Jung)
(15 CREDITS)

How can we use psychoanalytic theory to understand film, literature and television? What is culture and can it contribute to our understanding of psychoanalysis itself? Examine work by Freud and Jung, as well as more contemporary perspectives, through the lens popular culture.

PA140-4-FY
Introduction to Childhood Studies
(30 CREDITS)

In this module you will explore childhood from a local and a global perspective. You will discover a broad range of topics related to children and childhood, including psychology, sociology, history, media, law and education.

PA208-4-AU
Freud: Mind, Culture and Society
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Freud’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

PA209-4-SP
The Unconscious: Analytical Psychology, Culture and Society - Jung
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Jung’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

PS111-4-FY
Discovering Psychology: The Science Behind Human Behaviour
(30 CREDITS)

From this module you will gain an introduction to some of the various sub-fields that comprise psychology. It will include lectures on topics such as sensation, perception, learning, memory, abnormal psychology, child development, language, personality and social psychology.

PS118-4-FY
Applied Psychology
(30 CREDITS)

Discover how the discipline of psychology informs and shapes five psychological professions: clinical psychology; educational psychology; forensic psychology; occupational psychology; and sports and exercise psychology. In a mixture of lectures and classes, you will evaluate how psychological theories and knowledge gained from research are used in each of these aspects of human behaviour, and how they can be used to solve some of the problems encountered in different areas of life.

PY111-4-FY
Introduction to Philosophy
(30 CREDITS)

Begin your study of philosophy with an exploration of agency, selfhood, virtuous knowers, and healthy knowledge communities. What does it mean to say that we ‘know’ something? How do our modes of practical interaction with the world and each other shape our ability to know different kinds of objects? How should we address questions about selfhood and identity? Are there vices of the mind that distort our reasoning and lead our practical deliberations astray? How important is trust in a functional knowledge community? Can the study of philosophy help us flourish as moral and intellectual agents?

PY113-4-FY
Death, God and the Meaning of Life
(30 CREDITS)

Ask life’s big questions: What, if anything, is the meaning of our lives? How can we become wise? Can we make sense of human suffering? How should we think about our own deaths? You take up these questions, first, by examining a series of ancient narratives, including The Myth of Sisyphus and Eden and the Fall; and then through the study of key works of modern thinkers including Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, and Marx.

PY114-4-FY
Critical Reasoning and Logical Argument
(30 CREDITS)

Sharpen your philosophical skills through learning how to construct and deconstruct arguments. Learn how to identify arguments in philosophical texts, how to assess arguments for logical validity and soundness, and how to formulate your own arguments.

SC104-4-FY
Introduction to Crime, Law and Society
(30 CREDITS)

What are different forms of crime? What is the role of criminal justice? And how effective are penal sanctions? We provide a critical introduction to the problem of, and responses to, crime. You examine the history of criminological ideas, Britain’s criminal justice system, and current debates on crime and control.

SC106-4-FY
Media, Culture and Society
(30 CREDITS)

Does the media make people violent? Objectify women? Tell you what to do? Study the modern media as a social terrain, order of communication and domain of ideas, using examples from cinema, photography, newspapers and TV. Examine popular debates and consider practical methodologies for undertaking media research in the future.

SC107-4-FY
Introduction to Social Anthropology
(30 CREDITS)

How do you study culture? We analyse the history, methods, and theories of social anthropology, using a range of ethnographic and case studies (from witchcraft to the aesthetics of nomadic people). Develop a critical awareness of how your own culture, and that of others, can be studied.

SC111-4-FY
The Sociological Imagination
(30 CREDITS)

How can sociology help you understand the world in which you live? What are some of the major features and trends in present-day societies? Using sociological tools, you analyse key features of different societies, such as stratification, poverty, racism, consumption, multinational corporations, religion, and the gender division of labour in low-income countries.

SC164-4-SP
Introduction to United States Sociology
(15 CREDITS)

Who were the key sociologists studying the United States? And how have issues like democracy, inequality, gender roles, poverty, gangs and guns become sources of enchantment and disenchantment in the US? Studying one sociologist per week, we explore important and exciting interpretations of American society.

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