Component

MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA European Studies options

Year 1, Component 04

Language or EU option(s) from List D
AR119-4-SP
Art and Ideas: I
(15 CREDITS)

This module tackles some of the biggest questions surrounding the history of art. You will explore some key issues of philosophical aesthetics, such as the nature of representation, by engaging critically with seminal texts, artworks, and architecture. In this module, you will develop your analytical and interpretive skills, and leave with a solid foundation for the study of the history of art.

CS111-4-AU
The World Transformed: The Enlightenment and Its Critics
(15 CREDITS)

Ours is a world that seems to be shaking at its very foundations. Ideas that have shaped the way we see ourselves and the world around us – ideas like democracy, free speech, citizenship, political authority, individualism, free markets, and human rights – are contested at every turn. These ideas took their definitive modern form during a period of political and intellectual upheaval known as the Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1800). If we want to navigate our way through the chaos of today, then we need to return to the roots of our contemporary world – the Enlightenment. This interdisciplinary module explores this revolutionary period so that we can better understand our world today and bring about the world we want tomorrow. We will focus on political revolutions, on societal inequality, sickness, and control, and the dark side of technology. Graduating students often rank it among the most useful modules they've taken.

CS112-4-SP
The World Transformed: The Enlightenment and Its Critics
(15 CREDITS)

Ours is a world that seems to be shaking at its very foundations. Ideas that have shaped the way we see ourselves and the world around us – ideas like democracy, free speech, citizenship, political authority, individualism, free markets, and human rights – are contested at every turn. These ideas took their definitive modern form during a period of political and intellectual upheaval known as the Enlightenment (ca. 1650-1800). If we want to navigate our way through the chaos of today, then we need to return to the roots of our contemporary world – the Enlightenment. This interdisciplinary module explores this revolutionary period so that we can better understand our world today and bring about the world we want tomorrow. We will focus on debates surrounding knowledge, censorship and freedom of speech, the state of nature of the scope of political authority, and colonialism. Graduating students often rank it among the most useful modules they've taken.

EC111-4-FY
Introduction to Economics
(30 CREDITS)

How do consumers make decisions? Or firms conduct different market strategies? What impact does government policy have on inflation? Or unemployment? Develop your knowledge of economics in relation to a range of contemporary issues. Learn how to apply both micro and macroeconomic principles to the analysis of such problems.

EC120-4-FY
The World Economy in Historical Perspective
(30 CREDITS)

Why did industrialisation first occur in Europe, not China or India? How did economic growth lead to the Industrial Revolution? What impact did two world wars have on the global economy? Explore the process of economic change and development from the sixteenth-century to the present day.

GV100-4-AU
Introduction to Politics
(15 CREDITS)

What is “Politics”? How have people conceived of political analysis, the state, laws, wars and political parties, across cultures and over time? Gain an understanding of essential concepts in the study of politics and explore the economic, social and intellectual trends that have made democracy possible.

GV100-4-FY
Introduction to Politics
(30 CREDITS)

What is “Politics”? How have people conceived of political analysis, the state, laws, wars and political parties, across cultures and over time? Gain an understanding of essential concepts in the study of politics and explore the economic, social and intellectual trends that have made democracy possible.

GV103-4-AU
Introduction to International Relations
(15 CREDITS)

This module introduces students to the study of international relations, with a particular emphasis on two broad fields: international security and international political economy. Topics in international security include state and non-state actors, the nature of power, the causes of war and peace, terrorism, international institutions, and human rights. Topics in international political economy include trade, finance, European integration, the origins of underdevelopment, government responses to disasters, and foreign aid. Throughout the class, students are encouraged to apply theoretical concepts to real world events.

GV121-4-SP
Institutions of Democracy
(15 CREDITS)

What rules affect political action? You explore how institutions and the rules they enforce, for example voting under a specific electoral system, affect political and economic outcomes, and whether these are ultimately only second-best solutions to collective action.

HR106-4-SP
Democracy in Europe and the United States, 1789-1989
(15 CREDITS)

Democracy cannot be taken for granted. There was a long road to modern democracy and universal suffrage. Evolution of existing systems, revolutions, and wars created what is generally called Western Democracy. This module will explore the development of democracy in Europe and the United States over the last 200 years. It will examine how democratic states were established, challenged and reborn from the late eighteenth century to the late twentieth century. Europe experienced dictatorships, two World Wars and the fall of the Iron curtain in this time period, but it also saw the expansion of citizenship and civil liberties, the establishment of parliamentary democracies on a global scale and the emergence of the welfare states with greater social provisions for its populations. In the year that followed its creation, the United States rapidly expanded its franchise, but it also continued to exclude many people from the democratic process well into the twentieth century. The module will also investigate the crisis of the welfare state, the rise of Neo-Liberalism, and the rise of populism--all challenges to democratic systems in the past and today.

HR172-4-AU
War and the Twentieth-Century World: Experiences, Representations, and Legacies
(15 CREDITS)

The seismic upheaval of two world wars shaped twentieth-century society, culture, and politics across much of the globe. While the world wars raged, states directed the resources of all their citizens towards achieving victory, meaning that a range of actors beyond combatants were directly touched by conflict. In turn, those affected by war sought new relationships with nation-state, empire, and each other as they tried to come to terms with its legacies. The world wars therefore also inspired new visions of political and social life, generated subsequent conflicts and battles for independence, and caused the redrawing of borders in Europe and beyond. This module explores experiences, representations, and legacies of the two world wars and the cold war in multiple contexts. Lectures examine themes such as citizenship, trauma, and memory across these conflicts, while seminars focus on specific case studies from across the globe. Our aim is to understand not only how these wars affected different groups and individuals, but to trace the legacies of these conflicts in multiple arenas, and shed new light on how they continue to affect the world today. In emphasising society and culture, and the relationship between the local and the global, War and the Twentieth-Century World challenges conventional views of twentieth-century warfare and introduces students to diverse voices and perspectives.

LA043-4-FY
Concepts of Translation and Cultural Mediation
(30 CREDITS)

In this module, we will introduce you the theories of translation and interpreting, placing and emphasis on theories that explicitly address the intercultural component of translation and interpreting, i.e. understanding translation and interpreting as a form a intercultural communication. An emphasis will also be placed on the selection of materials that will feature a wide range of genres. This is because cultural differences may manifest differently across a variety of text types, for example, literature texts or diplomatic statements. By learning about the cultural background of the material selected, students are encourages to engage in a critical decision-making activity where they are challenged to navigate the nuances across cultural meanings and find the most suitable translation solutions. This module takes you a step further and encourages you to not just be translators or interpreters but intercultural mediators. To this end, text analysis, paraphrasing, condensation and summarising exercises, together with production of oral speeches, presentations (speaking in public) and short essays writing will constitute part of the module content and assessment. These tasks will also improve both language fluency and accuracy. Lectures are dedicated to the introduction of translation and interpreting theory. Seminars are language-specific and dedicated to the practice of translation and interpreting.

LA121-4-AU
Intensive Initial French 1
(15 CREDITS)

This module is for students with little or no knowledge of French. It is an interactive and intensive language module which uses various strategies for fast paced progress through the French language. It explores both the communicative and the structural aspects of the French language.

LA122-4-SP
Intensive Initial French 2
(15 CREDITS)

Continuing on from French Intensive Initial 1, this is an interactive and intensive language module for those who have little or no knowledge of French. It explores both the communicative and the structural aspects of the French language.

LA221-4-AU
Intensive Initial German 1
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn German from scratch? Study the German language from basic to advanced level, so that you can communicate in complex situations and read extended texts, like newspaper articles. Learn how to give short talks or presentations in German and be able to write German coherently.

LA222-4-SP
Intensive Initial German 2
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn German from scratch? Study the German language from basic to advanced level, so that you can communicate in complex situations and read extended texts, like newspaper articles. Learn how to give short talks or presentations in German and be able to write German coherently.

LA421-4-AU
Intensive Initial Spanish 1
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Spanish from scratch? And spend four weeks abroad during the summer? Build your language abilities, so you can read short stories or novels in Spanish, as well as articulate your ideas verbally or in writing. Undertake a research project, in Spanish, on a topic of your choosing.

LA422-4-SP
Intensive Initial Spanish 2
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Spanish from scratch? And spend four weeks abroad during the summer? Build your language abilities, so you can read short stories or novels in Spanish, as well as articulate your ideas verbally or in writing. Undertake a research project, in Spanish, on a topic of your choosing.

LA621-4-AU
Intensive Initial Italian 1
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Italian from scratch? Reach A-level Italian standard, gaining understanding of Italian language structure and functions. Take part in a variety of class activities, including individual and group work, to build your Italian communication skills.

LA622-4-SP
Intensive Initial Italian 2
(15 CREDITS)

Want to learn Italian from scratch? Reach A-level Italian standard, gaining understanding of Italian language structure and functions. Take part in a variety of class activities, including individual and group work, to build your Italian communication skills.

LA921-4-AU
Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 1
(15 CREDITS)

This is an interactive, intensive language module using blended-learning strategies to allow fast-paced progress through the Mandarin Chinese language and Mandarin Chinese speaking world. There is a dual focus on communicative and structural aspects of the language. Language learning is supported by an online guided independent study program and extended by multimedia activities. The module is designed for students with no or little knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. The aim of the module, in correlation with Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 2 in the Spring Term, is to enable students to attain a level of Mandarin Chinese equivalent to an A1/A2 level. It is the compulsory path for those students with no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese who intend to take the study of the language to a Higher Intermediate/Advanced level in their second/final year of study. This module can also be taken as an outside option.

LA922-4-SP
Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 2
(15 CREDITS)

This is an interactive, intensive language module using blended-learning strategies to allow fast-paced progress through the Mandarin Chinese language and Mandarin Chinese speaking world. It is a reinforcement and continuation of LA921, Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 1. It is a practical module which makes use of a wide range of authentic materials depicting real-life situations and activities. The aim of the module is to enable students to attain a level of Mandarin Chinese equivalent to an A1/A2 level. It is the compulsory path for those students with no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese who intend to take the study of the language to a Higher Intermediate/Advanced level in their second/final year. This module can also be taken as an outside option.

LA930-4-FY
Higher Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
(30 CREDITS)

This is an interactive, intensive language module using blended-learning strategies to allow fast-faced progress through the Mandarin Chinese language and Mandarin Chinese speaking world. It is a reinforcement and continuation of LA922, Intensive Initial Mandarin Chinese 2. It is a practical module which makes use of a wide range of textbook and online materials depicting real-life situations and activities. The aim of this module is to enable students to attain a level of Mandarin Chinese equivalent to a B1/B2 level. It is the compulsory path for those students with initial preliminary knowledge of Mandarin Chinese who intend to take the study of the language to a Higher Intermediate/Advanced level in their second/final year. This module can also be taken as an outside option.

LT171-4-SP
Introduction to European Literature
(15 CREDITS)

This module is an introduction to some of the most influential European writers from the Enlightenment period up to the present day. You study significant works of literature that sparked particular movements or represent crucial literary innovation. The works selected are novels, novellas, short stories and plays, and we examine these texts within their historical and political contexts. This module will help you to build understanding of the development of genres, forms, styles, content and ideas.

LW430-4-AU
Introduction to the Law of the European Union
(15 CREDITS)

What legal issues are involved with widening the EU? How is EU law supreme? What damages are there for non-implementation of a directive? Study EU constitutional and substantive law. Understand the role of EU institutions and build knowledge of EU law for gender equality, free movement of workers and competition.

PA209-4-SP
The Unconscious: Analytical Psychology, Culture and Society - Jung
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Jung’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

PY109-4-AU
Introduction to Epistemology
(15 CREDITS)

This module encourages students to reflect on what kind of knowers they want to be and what kind of knowledge community they want to belong to. We begin by considering why we possess the concept of knowledge at all. What good is it? What does it do for us? We will then explore some recent work in social epistemology, reflecting on how knowledge is an interpersonal phenomenon, focusing on the phenomena of echo chambers, epistemic injustice, and the role of trust in our knowledge practices. Next, we turn to work in political epistemology, looking at how politics shapes knowledge production and vice versa; we will focus in particular here on propaganda and belief polarization. Finally, we turn our attention to virtue and vice epistemology, which study the so-called virtues and vices of the mind. We will discuss important epistemic virtues that can help us flourish as knowers, e.g., self-reflection and intellectual perseverance; and we will also read about epistemic vices that undermine our capacity to acquire knowledge, e.g., closed-mindedness and dogmatism. By the end of the module, students will better understand how individual, social, and political factors interact in the human pursuit of knowledge.

PY110-4-SP
Self and Identity
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you will explore ethical challenges from today's world (such as how to treat animals, the climate emergency, or making decisions about who should be prioritised in allocating medical resources). You will also explore ethical theories as tools for navigating these challenges. Shall we look to the consequences of our actions for orientation? Or to constraints on the means we take as agents? Or might we fare better by considering character dispositions and taking our cue from exemplars? And what methods do we have at our disposal to decide between these alternatives? Is there such a thing as ethics anyway? Or are there just personal opinions and everything is relative?

PY113-4-FY
Death, God and the Meaning of Life
(30 CREDITS)

Ask life’s big questions: What, if anything, is the meaning of our lives? How can we become wise? Can we make sense of human suffering? How should we think about our own deaths? You take up these questions, first, by examining a series of ancient narratives, including The Myth of Sisyphus and Eden and the Fall; and then through the study of key works of modern thinkers including Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, and Marx.

PY114-4-AU
Critical Reasoning
(15 CREDITS)

Sharpen your philosophical skills through learning how to construct and deconstruct arguments. Learn how to identify arguments in philosophical texts, how to assess arguments for logical validity and soundness, and how to formulate your own arguments.

PY114-4-FY
Critical Reasoning and Logical Argument
(30 CREDITS)

Sharpen your philosophical skills through learning how to construct and deconstruct arguments. Learn how to identify arguments in philosophical texts, how to assess arguments for logical validity and soundness, and how to formulate your own arguments.

SC104-4-FY
Introduction to Crime, Law and Society
(30 CREDITS)

What are different forms of crime? What is the role of criminal justice? And how effective are penal sanctions? We provide a critical introduction to the problem of, and responses to, crime. You examine the history of criminological ideas, Britain’s criminal justice system, and current debates on crime and control.

SC106-4-FY
Media, Culture and Society
(30 CREDITS)

Does the media make people violent? Objectify women? Tell you what to do? Study the modern media as a social terrain, order of communication and domain of ideas, using examples from cinema, photography, newspapers and TV. Examine popular debates and consider practical methodologies for undertaking media research in the future.

SC111-4-FY
The Sociological Imagination
(30 CREDITS)

How can sociology help you understand the world in which you live? What are some of the major features and trends in present-day societies? Using sociological tools, you analyse key features of different societies, such as stratification, poverty, racism, consumption, multinational corporations, religion, and the gender division of labour in low-income countries.

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