MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Film and Creative Writing options

Final Year, Component 01

Film option(s) from list
LT321-6-SP
Possible Worlds: Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction, and Alternate Histories
(15 CREDITS)
LT347-6-FY
American Film Authors
(30 CREDITS)

How powerful is Hollywood? How do directors construct an image of the USA? Examine how directors have created America in the popular imagination. Study Hollywood auteurs (such as Chaplin, Hawks, Hitchcock, Welles and Ford) alongside others (such as Scorsese, Allen and Lee) while covering the breadth of US film history.

LT364-6-SP
Cyborgs, Clones and the Rise of the Robots: Science Fiction
(15 CREDITS)
LT368-6-AU
Cityscapes of Modernism
(15 CREDITS)

What are the cultural capitals of modernism? How are modernist arts shaped by the metropolitan life experience? Examine literature, film, art and music, studying aesthetic practices and cultural contexts of modernism. Read and discuss cities with vibrant artistic and political activities: New York, Paris, London, Dublin, Vienna, Berlin and Petersburg.

LT385-6-SP
The Story and Myth of the West
(15 CREDITS)

Investigate the myths surrounding the founding of the United States. Crossing disciplines of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and cinematic and theatrical texts, you compare the classic Western against a range of counter-narratives from black, Hispanic, latino, and aboriginal storytellers. This module interrogates the concept of a 'national literature', explores the relationship between folklore and contemporary society, and investigates the relationship between the Western as a narrative form, and the history of colonialism in the U.S.A.

LT390-6-AU
The Limits of Representation: The Holocaust in Literature and Film
(15 CREDITS)
LT397-6-FY
Extinction: Looking back at the End of the World
(30 CREDITS)

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