MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
MSc Computational Finance options

Year 1, Component 09

Option from list
CE705-7-AU
Introduction to Programming in Python
(15 CREDITS)

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to computer programming for students with little or no previous experience. The Python language is used in the Linux environment, and students are given a comprehensive introduction to both during the module. The emphasis is on developing the practical skills necessary to write effective programs, with examples taken principally from the realm of data processing and analysis. You will learn how to manipulate and analyse data, graph them and fit models to them. Teaching takes place in workshop-style sessions in a software laboratory, so you can try things out as soon as you learn about them.

CE719-7-AU
ICT Systems Integration and Management
(15 CREDITS)
CE802-7-AU
Machine Learning
(15 CREDITS)

Humans can often perform a task extremely well (e.g., telling cats from dogs) but are unable to understand and describe the decision process followed. Without this explicit knowledge, we cannot write computer programs that can be used by machines to perform the same task. “Machine learning” is the study and application of methods to learn such algorithms automatically from sets of examples, just like babies can learn to tell cats from dogs simply by being shown examples of dogs and cats by their parents. Machine learning has proven particularly suited to cases such as optical character recognition, dictation software, language translators, fraud detection in financial transactions, and many others.

CE885-7-AU
Mathematical Research Techniques Using Matlab
(15 CREDITS)

Mathematics is a tool used in many fields of research, and this module introduces students to techniques and ways of thinking designed to enable them to carry out their own mathematical investigations, or to apply mathematical ideas to an investigation of their own (typically for most students on this module, this will be their Dissertation project). We use the industry standard mathematical software Matlab, although the techniques introduced can also be applied using other software, and we study a range of techniques for numerical computation and processing of data.

CE889-7-AU
Neural Networks and Deep Learning
(15 CREDITS)

The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the role of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in computer science and artificial intelligence. This will allow the student to build computers and intelligent machines which are able to have an artificial brain which will allow them to learn and adapt in a human like fashion.

CF969-7-SP
Big-Data for Computational Finance
(15 CREDITS)

This module is a mix of theory and practice with big data cases in finance. Algorithmic and data science theories will be introduced and followed by a thorough introduction of data-driven algorithms for structures and unstructured data. Modern machine learning and data mining algorithms will be introduced with particular case studies on financial industry.

EC911-7-AU
Computational Market Microstructure for FinTech and the Digital Economy
(20 CREDITS)

Equip yourself with principles of allocation and mechanism design from an operational perspective. Auction design and market microstructure of the stock market, liquidity provision in electronic financial markets such as dark pools, and capital adequacy of centralized clearing platforms are some of the specific applications that will be studied in the first part of this module. During the second part, you will be introduced to complexity economics of self-organisation, network modules, and strategic proteanism. Finally, you'll use network models to study economic interactions.

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