MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
MSc Internet of Things options

Year 1, Component 08

Option(s) from list
CE703-7-AU
Networking Principles
(15 CREDITS)

This module provides an introduction to the architecture and services of modern telecommunication networks. A general introduction illustrates the major features of a network, how they interact and introduce the concept of an intelligent network. Switching is an essential requirement and the ideas behind circuit, packet and cell switching are presented. The basics of the TCP/IP protocol suite are described. Optical transmission and networking, key features for future networks, are discussed. To present the main concepts involved in current and future telecommunication and information networks, the concepts presented will be supported by the other core courses.

CE705-7-AU
Introduction to Programming in Python
(15 CREDITS)

The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to computer programming for students with little or no previous experience. The Python language is used in the Linux environment, and students are given a comprehensive introduction to both during the module. The emphasis is on developing the practical skills necessary to write effective programs, with examples taken principally from the realm of data processing and analysis. You will learn how to manipulate and analyse data, graph them and fit models to them. Teaching takes place in workshop-style sessions in a software laboratory, so you can try things out as soon as you learn about them.

CE708-7-AU
Computer Security
(15 CREDITS)

This course gives an introduction to computer security and cryptography, and then goes on to consider security as it relates to a single, network connected, computer. Introductory material is independent of any operating system but the consideration of tools will focus on those available for Linux, partly because its open-source nature facilitates this and partly because it is widely used on server systems. The introduction to cryptography will be used to consider its use in encryption and authentication.

CE719-7-AU
ICT Systems Integration and Management
(15 CREDITS)
CE721-7-SP
Electronic System Design and Integration
(15 CREDITS)

This module provides first-hand experience of the design simulation and production of complex electronic circuits. A word specification is provided for a consumer electronics device for which a prototype is designed using reference and first principles. The circuit is then simulated and tested in Multisim to verify operation. Once satisfactory, a hardware prototype is developed on a prototype medium e.g. breadboard and tested in real-world conditions. Then using PCB design software, a PCB is designed and populated to produce the final product. The module has a large emphasis on the practical with a lighter emphasis on the theoretical.

CE740-7-SP
Mobile Communications
(15 CREDITS)

What are the main challenges when using wireless connections? And what are the higher-layer techniques for exploiting wireless physical links? Study the technology underlying current and future wireless communications systems. Understand the concepts of radio transmissions and the different types of multiple access techniques.

CE801-7-AU
Intelligent Systems and Robotics
(15 CREDITS)

This module gives an introduction to intelligent systems and robotics. It goes on to consider the essential hardware for sensing and manipulating the real world, and their properties and characteristics. The programming of intelligent systems and real-world robots are explored in the context of localisation, mapping, and fuzzy logic control.

CE823-7-SP
Network Security
(15 CREDITS)

This module considers the application of security to networked computers and systems. It will cover how to secure a network by applying methods to detect, mitigate and/or stop attacks. Based on the assumption that public networks will always be open to compromise, this course introduces techniques to secure transmitted data, including the management of encryption systems and communication.

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