MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Film and Creative Writing options

Final Year, Component 02

Film or Creative Writing option(s) from list
LT320-6-SP
Post-War(s) United States Fiction
(15 CREDITS)

How has the American identity and purpose changed since World War Two? And how is this reflected in literature? Gain answers to these questions via a range of American texts. Analyse these works using a variety of critical approaches, considering social, political and cultural contexts since the Second World War.

LT321-6-SP
Possible Worlds: Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction, and Alternate Histories
(15 CREDITS)
LT342-6-SP
Dreaming and Writing
(15 CREDITS)

Great literature – the stuff that dreams are made of? This workshop-based module investigates experimental film, art, literature, and poetry. Drawing inspiration from your own dreams, as well as dream theories and literary dream works, you are encouraged to experiment with character and voice, developing your own distinct identity as a writer.

LT346-6-AU
The Beginning of a Novel
(15 CREDITS)
LT347-6-FY
American Film Authors
(30 CREDITS)

How powerful is Hollywood? How do directors construct an image of the USA? Examine how directors have created America in the popular imagination. Study Hollywood auteurs (such as Chaplin, Hawks, Hitchcock, Welles and Ford) alongside others (such as Scorsese, Allen and Lee) while covering the breadth of US film history.

LT358-6-AU
Writing Lyrics
(15 CREDITS)

The emphasis of this module will be on writing song lyrics for performance, but it will also include writing lyrics ‘for the page’. In addition to writing lyrics of your own, you study serious lyrics in popular music, and have a chance to examine the relationship between these and other writing. You will also be able to choose a writer, or writers, in this field and write an essay on their work, alongside your own lyrics towards an ‘album’ with a commentary on the writing process.

LT359-6-SP
Creative Writing: Oulipo and the Avant Garde
(15 CREDITS)

Are you an experienced writer or beginner? Interested in writing stories or poetry? Science fiction or detective fiction? We offer something for all! Explore the theory and practice of creative writing through the unique work of the Oulipo Workshop of Potential Literature, founded by Raymond Queneau in 1960.

LT364-6-SP
Cyborgs, Clones and the Rise of the Robots: Science Fiction
(15 CREDITS)
LT368-6-AU
Cityscapes of Modernism
(15 CREDITS)

What are the cultural capitals of modernism? How are modernist arts shaped by the metropolitan life experience? Examine literature, film, art and music, studying aesthetic practices and cultural contexts of modernism. Read and discuss cities with vibrant artistic and political activities: New York, Paris, London, Dublin, Vienna, Berlin and Petersburg.

LT372-6-AU
Shakespeare: The Tragedies
(15 CREDITS)

To what degree are Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth and Othello tragedies? How useful is this term in understanding them? Undertake a close reading of Shakespeare’s four great tragedies. Critically discuss recent issues about each, in groups and in your own work. Gain an understanding of their enduring and/or present significance.

LT380-6-AU
"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
(15 CREDITS)

How do US writers imagine and represent the Caribbean? And vice versa? Deepen knowledge of American literature by examining poetic, fictional, nonfictional and dramatic works in a broader context. Investigate contemporary issues like the American Dream, what it means to be from the Americas, migration, and the question of language.

LT380-6-FY
"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
(30 CREDITS)

How do US writers imagine and represent the Caribbean? And vice versa? Deepen knowledge of American literature by examining poetic, fictional, nonfictional and dramatic works in a broader context. Investigate contemporary issues like the American Dream, what it means to be from the Americas, migration, and the question of language.

LT380-6-SP
"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
(15 CREDITS)

How do US writers imagine and represent the Caribbean? And vice versa? Deepen knowledge of American literature by examining poetic, fictional, nonfictional and dramatic works in a broader context. Investigate contemporary issues like the American Dream, what it means to be from the Americas, migration, and the question of language.

LT385-6-SP
The Story and Myth of the West
(15 CREDITS)

Investigate the myths surrounding the founding of the United States. Crossing disciplines of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and cinematic and theatrical texts, you compare the classic Western against a range of counter-narratives from black, Hispanic, latino, and aboriginal storytellers. This module interrogates the concept of a 'national literature', explores the relationship between folklore and contemporary society, and investigates the relationship between the Western as a narrative form, and the history of colonialism in the U.S.A.

LT390-6-AU
The Limits of Representation: The Holocaust in Literature and Film
(15 CREDITS)
LT396-6-AU
Journalism and Storytelling
(15 CREDITS)
LT397-6-FY
Extinction: Looking back at the End of the World
(30 CREDITS)
TH344-6-FY
Writing for the Theatre
(30 CREDITS)

Taught by award-winning professional playwrights, this module takes you through the A-Z of writing full-length plays. In this laboratory environment we study the tools and techniques you need to write successfully for the theatre. The module examines the different approaches available to the playwright, and challenges ideas about form, structure and use of language. Studying a range of playscripts in depth, you will develop your skills through practical exercises and assignments. This module gives you the opportunity to enhance your own creative process and progress your professional career.

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