Clearing 2021
MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Liberal Arts options

Final Year, Component 02

Option(s) from list: Choose discipline taken in previous year
AR207-6-AU
Picturing the City I
(15 CREDITS)

Edo/Tokyo is an urban, imperial capital city whose history is run through with the strata of waves of historical devastation – it was battered by volcanic eruption in 1707, decimated by major earthquakes in 1855 and 1923, and was heavily bombarded from the air during the defeat in WWII. Both architecturally and culturally, centuries of political and physical upheaval have rendered Edo/Tokyo a fertile site for radical art practices.

AR223-6-AU
Art and Power
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the vibrant artistic culture of the Renaissance court, an environment where magnificence and splendour served to justify rule, neutralisze dissent, and enforce hierarchies of power. In the courts of Milan, Ferrara, and Florence, among others, we will encounter famed artists like Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Titian. Paying particular attention to gender, this module examines the role of visual culture in shaping conceptions of ruling authority, chivalry, courtly love, virility, fecundity, and beauty.

AR224-5-SP
Study Trip Abroad (Year 2)
(15 CREDITS)

As part of this module you have the opportunity to go on a 7-10 day study trip to a European City during which you will visit museums, key building and cultural sites in the city to see art from the Renaissance to the Present. The School provide a subsidy for Art History students for this trip, but you will be responsible for covering any additional costs outside of this. Any students who do not study Art History will be required to cover their own costs. Costs will differ each year depending on the destination and details for the trip.

AR229-6-AU
Digital Heritage and Museums
(15 CREDITS)

Digital technologies are re-defining contemporary heritage practices. Digital technologies and media are used for re-presenting, managing and disseminating information about cultural heritage as well as producing new cultural information on the web, which establishes digital heritage as a new field of study. This module will present digital heritage theories and explore how digital practices are changing the role of heritage institutions and museums as sites for the study, preservation and dissemination of cultural heritage.

AR312-6-SP
Contemporary Art: 1980 to the Present
(15 CREDITS)

Thai curry for gallery-goers, and the aftermath of a monster attack – just two examples of how contemporary artists are pushing techniques, processes and media to the limit. Explore how the attitudes and approaches to art have evolved over the last 30 years, and the crucial precursors who influenced them, whilst always considering how the context in which art is made and received – be it geographical, sociological, political, or philosophical – affects its production, reception, and interpretation.

AR322-6-SP
The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, New Media, Software and the Internet
(15 CREDITS)

This module follows on from AR321, and presents the artwork of the post-mechanical age. Uncover how new media, such as film and video, cybernetics, robotics, video games and the internet have been used to create art from the 1960s to the present day. Investigate the issues of production, reception, display, the acceptance of new media into the art world, whilst attempting to link the issues raised by new media artists to your own experiences of life in an increasingly digital world.

AR323-6-SP
Art and Ideas III
(15 CREDITS)

This third art and ideas module deepens your existing thematic and historiographical knowledge building on Art and Ideas 2. We’ll be looking back at ‘the history of art history’ before the twentieth century. We’ll also look forward, to new cutting-edge theoretical approaches to arts, visual and material cultures.

AR342-6-SP
Study Trip Abroad (Final Year)
(15 CREDITS)

As part of this module you have the opportunity to go on a 7-10 day study trip to a European City during which you will visit museums, key building and cultural sites in the city to see art from the Renaissance to the Present. The School provide a subsidy for Art History students for this trip, but you will be responsible for covering any additional costs outside of this. Any students who do not study Art History will be required to cover their own costs. Costs will differ each year depending on the destination and details for the trip.

AR346-6-AU
Inventing the Future: Early Contemporary 1945-1980
(15 CREDITS)

The period from 1945 to 1980 marked one of the most explosive and dynamic moments in the history of art. Discover how the specter of the Holocaust and the ideological divisions of the Cold War shaped the production and reception of art in the two decades following World War II. Also learn how major political developments of the 1960s and 1970s, such as Stonewall, student protests and the feminist movement, transformed the practice, theory and history of art, ultimately providing a hyper-politicised foundation for the emergence of postmodernism.

BE116-6-AU
Elements of Corporate and Business Law
(15 CREDITS)

Develop your legal knowledge by studying Partnership Law, followed by various aspects of Company Law (including professional negligence), together with the rules of Agency, Insolvency principles, the offence of Insider Dealing and Employment Law.

BE130-6-FY
Current Issues in Financial Reporting
(30 CREDITS)

What does accounting do and why, and what is done in the name of accounting but might <i>not</i> be accounting? Does accounting enable us to talk or does it erect barriers around issues so that the debate is silenced or limited? Who should make accounting standards? Should it be the state, professional bodies or some private interests? These are some of the key issues facing producers, consumers, and regulators of corporate financial reports.

BE131-6-AU
Advanced Management Accounting
(15 CREDITS)

Management accounting serves the purpose of identifying, measuring and communicating economic information to permit management and workforce make informed judgements and decisions. Investigate the technical issues in cost management and performance measurement systems, and wider issues concerning the role of management accounting in shaping management structures and decisions in manufacturing and service contexts.

BE132-6-SP
Auditing
(15 CREDITS)

What are the key concepts and issues in auditing? You are introduced to the role of the auditor, followed by an analysis and evaluation of the two main audit approaches: audit risk-based auditing and business risk-based auditing. You then discover key auditing concepts such as the true and fair view, evidence and independence.

BE133-6-SP
Critical Debates in Accounting
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you evaluate contemporary developments and research in the field of management accounting, using real-life business case studies. You explore management accounting within economic, political, social and cultural contexts, exploring issues such as deregulation, globalisation and increasing customer demands. You examine strategic issues such as cost management, performance measurement and management controls and explore how organisational and technological changes are impacting the discipline both nationally and internationally.

BE142-6-SP
Taxation Policy and Practice
(15 CREDITS)

Understanding tax is key to the work of most accountants, whether your client is a self-employed sole trader or a huge multi-national organisation. In this module you will use the UK tax system as the framework to develop your skills in this area and you’ll critically reflect on the impact of taxation to individual taxpayers, government and society.

BE329-6-AU
Financial Management
(15 CREDITS)

This module develops your understanding of how modern financial management techniques work in practice and how they can be used to support corporate decision making. We explore the nature and purpose of financial management, the role of financial institutions and the money market and how stakeholders affect corporate objectives. You explore the technical aspects of financial management and explore techniques used for business and asset valuation, investment appraisal and managing capital.

BE331-6-SP
The Pricing of Securities in Financial Markets
(15 CREDITS)

Investigate the theoretical foundations of some widely used pricing models for securities traded in financial markets – equities, options and bonds. You gain an understanding of the theoretical foundations of these models so that you can appreciate both the usefulness and/or the weakness of these models.

BE332-6-AU
Options and Futures
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you study the derivative market, in particular, futures and options markets. You explore various futures markets including the stock index, FX, commodities and interest rate contracts, how they are priced and hedged, and different trading strategies; as well as considering different option positions, the relationship between call and put option prices, and trading strategies.

BE333-6-AU
Empirical Finance
(15 CREDITS)

Master the necessary skills to conduct econometric research. You consider the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) method and time series analysis, the conditions under which OLS is employable, the pitfalls and caveats when using OLS and performing analyses on time series data using any estimation method, and prediction and forecasting.

BE334-6-AU
Financial Markets and Monetary Policy
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the links between money, financial intermediaries, financial markets and the policies that affect them. In particular, you examine the effects of monetary policy on financial markets and on the economy as a whole. Gain an understanding of how interest rates, money supply and central bank actions affect the decisions of economic agents, financial markets and prices.

BE418-6-SP
Management and the Cultural Industries
(15 CREDITS)

An increasingly important sector, the cultural industries are distinctive both in terms of their political economy and their organizational forms, management systems and labour processes. You consider what is distinctive about culture as an economic product, and what this distinctiveness means for the structure of the industries.

BE420-6-SP
Leadership in Organisations
(15 CREDITS)

This module aims to develop your understanding of leadership in organisations. You explore a range of traditional and current leadership theories and relate these to business and managerial practice. You also examine business ethics and develop your team working, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

BE421-6-AU
Personality Differences at Work: a Myers-Briggs Perspective
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), an internationally recognised model of personality. You learn about the fundamental structure and concepts used in the MBTI, as well as developing an understanding of their own personality type according to the theory, and exploring how this theory can be applied to a variety of work issues.

BE422-6-SP
Business and International Development
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores enterprise-based development models within the developing world and examines their impact upon sustainable development and poverty alleviation. Using case studies from across Africa, India, and the UK, you learn about a range of social purpose business models, such as social enterprises, not for profit, green for profit and fair trade. You learn about the role of the informal economy, areas such as social exclusion and debates around social enterprises.

BE432-6-SP
Financial Crashes and Consequences
(15 CREDITS)

This exciting finance module reflects on the causes and consequences of financial crashes. It will introduce you to the theoretical financial concepts within which crashes are analysed and understood and expand upon the analytical frameworks such as law, history, economics and sociology through which financial crashes can be conceptualised. The module offers an insight into a range of current business considerations, management dilemmas, legal and ethical predicaments, and public governance issues relating to the current business environment, providing you with an introduction to the state of the present economy and a critical examination of the consequences for business rooted in series of real world case studies.

BE433-6-AU
Human Resource Management
(15 CREDITS)

Since the 1980's, Human Resource Management (HRM) has promoted the view that it is the people (rather that the technology, products or marketing strategies) of the organisation that are the key to organisational success. You question the assumptions made within HRM as a philosophy and practice, and how this approach has implications for the way that employees are conceptualised, managed and treated within organisations.

BE434-6-SP
Management Psychology
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the psychology of organising. You investigate the role of the individual in the organisation, the construction of meaning, bureaucratic and technological consciousness, organisational socialisation and secondary adjustments, and the significance of organising principles such as time, gender and motive. Use film and video material to explore the issues raised and to provide contextual support for the ideas, including feature films such as GI Jane, She Stood Alone and Vertigo.

BE435-6-SP
Management, Society and New Forms of Work
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the future of management and work in light of contemporary social theory and social, political and economic changes. You look at new organisational forms, such as management consultancy, symbolic analysis and affective labour, as well as new forms of exchange, such as Open Source software. You explore resistance to social-economic change, such as neo-Luddism, culture-jamming, alternative media, anti-globalization and popular movements against precarious labour. By comparison, you also examine more conventional forms of organisation, including sweatshops, fast food, retail, call centres, mining and agriculture.

BE437-6-AU
Perspectives on Technology, Organisation and Society
(15 CREDITS)

Gain an insight into the relationship between management, the innovation process and the development, application, and use of new technologies. You focus primarily on process innovations, building upon your knowledge of operations management and the process of producing and delivering goods and services.

BE439-6-AU
Business Ethics
(15 CREDITS)

This module builds on your understanding of management and organisation by considering the ethics of business activity. You are introduced to the origins, practice and theory of business ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR). You consider a range of perspectives and use business literature to critically examine organisational ethics and analyse its constraints.

BE440-6-AU
Brand Management
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the fascinating world of brands in our contemporary cultures, and investigate the consequences for contemporary marketing practices and for organisational practices more generally. You examine the notion of brand identity, brand image, the issues of brand development and extension, and the consumption of brands. You are also introduced to managerial and marketing issues central to brand management.

BE447-6-AU
Managing Innovation and Technology
(15 CREDITS)

This module focuses on the management of innovation activities and how businesses may benefit from the development and application of technology. It introduces the management of innovation and technology as a multiple perspective approach, which incorporates the key areas of the business and management together. The module provides a clear overview of the critical theories and concepts of innovation management. It also highlights the issues and factors involved in the management and development of new products, new services, new technologies, and new business models. Since managing innovation and technology is crucial to a firm's success, understanding the above factors can lead to the success of the innovative firm in the short and long-term.

BE530-6-SP
Critical Marketing Perspectives
(15 CREDITS)

Marketing is part of our everyday lives, embedded into all spheres of society. Marketing techniques are not only used by corporations to promote their products and services. Governments, charities, social movements and protest groups also use these techniques to seek to shape our norms, lifestyles and culture. This module explores a range of contemporary marketing discourses and critically examines their impact on marketing practices and on society.

BE630-6-SP
International Finance
(15 CREDITS)

Gain a thorough understanding of the basic international arbitrage relationships of some basic models of exchange rate determination. You then explore topics in economics such as models of currency crisis, and the South American and East Asian Crisis, and investigate international markets from the perspective of a multinational firm, where topics such as the international cost of capital and foreign direct investment are covered.

BE631-6-SP
Risk Management and Financial Institutions
(15 CREDITS)

The (mis)use of financial derivatives can potentially have catastrophic consequences for those who acquire them. And yet in recent years derivatives have become increasingly important, both for the financial sector and for the wider economy. On this course you discover how risk can be managed with the use of derivative instruments.

BE632-6-SP
International Banking
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the nature, functions and strategic drivers of international banking institutions and markets. You examine the different types of global banking institutions, including commercial, investment, retail, private and offshore financial centres. Topics include international banking activities and services (such as trade finance, loans sales and securitisation), international banking regulation, failures and crises and comparative banking. You also explore current trends and risks affecting international banks.

BE633-6-AU
Alternative Investments
(15 CREDITS)
BE634-6-SP
Corporate and Investment Banking Services
(15 CREDITS)

Corporate and Investment banking includes a heterogeneous set of activities. The module aims at analysing the major corporate and investment banking services, related to mergers and acquisitions, capital markets services (as private equity, venture capital, structure financial products and initial public offerings) and credit market services (as securitization and non-performing loans management).

CE322-6-AU
Algorithmic Game Theory
(15 CREDITS)
CS300-6-SP
Community Engagement: Group Projects
(15 CREDITS)

This module offers final year students a unique opportunity to work together in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world project for a local partner organisation. It enables you to use the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired during your degree to address a real-world challenge, while sharing and developing your creative, organisational and practical abilities. By doing so, this module will prepare you for entering the graduate labour market or going on to post-graduate study.

CS301-6-AU
Dangerous Ideas: Essays as Social Criticism
(15 CREDITS)

Is Montaigne right to wonder whether we Westerners are worse off morally than tribes who practice cannibalism? What kind of writing does George Orwell champion? What did Marx and Engels achieve with ‘The Communist Manifesto’? Examine the ‘dangerous ideas’ presented in a range of subversive essays and manifestos. Study how they challenge and satirise existing ideas and social arrangements. Experiment with writing, thus broadening the approach of your own essays.

CS301-6-FY
Dangerous Ideas: Essays and Manifestos as Social Criticism Capstone
(30 CREDITS)

Is Montaigne right to wonder whether we Westerners are worse off morally than tribes who practice cannibalism? What kind of writing does George Orwell champion? What did Marx and Engels achieve with ‘The Communist Manifesto’? Examine the ‘dangerous ideas’ presented in a range of subversive essays and manifestos. Study how they challenge and satirise existing ideas and social arrangements. Experiment with writing, thus broadening the approach of your own essays.

CS301-6-SP
Dangerous Ideas: Manifestos as Social Criticism
(15 CREDITS)

Is Montaigne right to wonder whether we Westerners are worse off morally than tribes who practice cannibalism? What kind of writing does George Orwell champion? What did Marx and Engels achieve with ‘The Communist Manifesto’? Examine the ‘dangerous ideas’ presented in a range of subversive essays and manifestos. Study how they challenge and satirise existing ideas and social arrangements. Experiment with writing, thus broadening the approach of your own essays.

CS315-6-AU
Global Challenges in Interdisciplinary Perspective: Water Conflicts, Water Cultures
(15 CREDITS)

Access to water is one of the most urgent global challenges facing us today. Vital for health and well-being, as well as integral to indigenous cultures and industrial processes, water is a threatened commons and contested commodity. In this module, we will explore global and local case studies that highlight challenges of scarcity, contamination, privatization, and climate change, and the cultural importance of bodies of water for diverse communities. We will examine water-related problems, such as economic and urban development, grassroots activism, political conflict, community relations, heritage and public health.

CS316-6-FY
Democracy in Action
(30 CREDITS)

This module will allow third year students to do their final year project in an innovative and interdisciplinary way. The module seeks to give students the possibility to better understand their community, the issues it confronts and how to address them. Through the five step training of Citizens UK (1. Organise 2. Listen 3. Plan 4. Act 5. Negotiate) the students will learn the basics of community building and organising, which they will be able to practice and experience for themselves. Students will learn to build power and negotiate with local government on issues of local concern such as hate crime, transport, mental health and housing.

CS831-6-FY
Final Year Dissertation
(30 CREDITS)

This module is for ISC students doing a final year semester abroad and for Global Studies who do CS315-AU. It enables these students to do a short 6,000 word dissertation in the Spring term. This workshop module enables you to pace your research and writing and to present your work to the co-ordinator and your peers. By doing so it helps you to keep on track and receive valuable feedback and guidance while you write your dissertation.

EC203-6-SP
Technological change: past, present and future prospects
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you will focus on the economic history of economic growth and technical change centred on the 'second industrial revolution' and stemming from the advances in the latter part of the 19th century. Beginning with an overview of global patterns of growth to the early 21st century, you’ll be introduced to macroeconomic approaches to long-run growth, in particular accounting for technological change. You’ll focus on case studies of key sectors contributing to technical progress, including electricity, chemicals, in the late 19th century through to Information and Communications Technology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

EC209-6-SP
Introduction to Behavioural Economics
(15 CREDITS)

This module introduces students to the field of behavioural economics which combines economic analysis with insights from psychology to understand human behaviour. This module is offered at second year undergraduate, and at third year undergraduate. While the content is the same for both levels, the learning outcomes assessed in the modules are slightly different.

EC261-6-SP
Management of New Technology
(15 CREDITS)

What economic issues do computing firms face today? What about the pharmaceutical industry? Or telecommunication organisations? How does new technological knowledge allow these firms to keep a competitive edge? Using real-life case studies, learn how economics model-building methodology helps with the challenges of managing new technology in the modern world.

EC322-6-SP
Microeconomics (Advanced)
(15 CREDITS)

Gain a rich background in the concepts and techniques of game theory, its uses, limitations and issues. The course is also applied, focussing on several important cases of strategic interaction, including auctions, interactions between rival firms, moral hazard and adverse selection, and the theory of the firm. Upon completion of the course, you will be able to evaluate the impact the strategic considerations in the analysis of interactions among decision-makers, and you will have learned how to apply game theory to issues in microeconomics.

EC324-6-AU
Macroeconomics (Advanced)
(15 CREDITS)

This module develops the material started in Intermediate Macroeconomics and aims to give students an understanding of the main types of economic data; how those data are collected, constructed and used and Key ideas in the module will be illustrated with reference to recent events and current policy debates. Upon successful completion of this module, you will be able to approach macroeconomic data critically, and to evaluate the strength of empirical evidence for macroeconomic theories and macroeconomic policy positions.

EC335-6-SP
Strategies of Economic Development
(15 CREDITS)

This module examines the distinctive features of less developed economies and introduces you to the literature that attempts to explain the persistence of poverty in those economies. We start with a historical analysis of the growth process to examine why there has been a divergence in the performances between the developed and the developing countries. The module will then elaborate on the role of institutions and incentives in shaping long run economic development. In particular, we shall examine the role of market imperfections, non-market institutions (such as social norms) and governance institutions.

EC351-6-SP
Mathematical Economics
(15 CREDITS)

Expand on the mathematical techniques you developed in Mathematical Methods in Economics. You’ll learn how to use additional mathematical tools, which will enable you to analyse a larger, richer, and more interesting set of economic models. The main focus of the course is on methods for studying dynamic economic problems. Rather than concentrating exclusively on mathematical techniques, intuition for how and why these techniques work will be developed through application to specific economic problems.

EC352-6-AU
Econometric Methods
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you will explore a range of methods used in the modern application of econometric techniques to economic and financial data. The course will enable you to practise the relevant methods, rather than to derive estimators or tests, or to prove the theorems upon which these are based.

EC355-6-SP
Public Economics
(15 CREDITS)

Analyse the economics rationale for ‘collective choice’ in a market economy in this applied module. Explore social welfare, equity and efficiency, and evaluate the government’s ability to identify and achieve ‘better’ outcomes. By analysing actual programmes in areas of poverty reduction, education, and health, you will be able to apply your knowledge of broad empirical patterns and institutions to real-life situations in the UK and abroad.

EC363-6-SP
Labour Economics
(15 CREDITS)

How have labour markets changed over time? Why is there an increased inequality of wages? In this module, you will investigate the determination of labour market outcomes, and discuss why and how differences across individuals occur. Using practical examples throughout, you will develop vital analytical tools needed to understand wage and employment foundation and trends, and will discuss what makes the labour market so important.

EC365-6-SP
Theory of Monopoly and Regulation
(15 CREDITS)

How does a monopolist make decisions? And what impact do such decisions have? How can regulators control this behaviour? Build your understanding of monopoly industries, starting with the sources, creation and exercise of monopoly power. Critically assess the principles and practices of monopoly regulation, using real-world examples from industry.

EC366-6-AU
Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour
(15 CREDITS)

How do firms make decisions? And how do these decisions impact on the prices you pay? What role does game theory play? Understand strategic interaction among firms, using theoretical tools to examine real-world examples. Analyse the main economic forces behind firm behaviour, adapting economic models to study particular challenges.

EC367-6-SP
The Economic Geography of Employment, Innovation and Trade
(15 CREDITS)

Despite all the talk about the “death of distance”, geography matters more than ever. This course is a journey through the current economic landscape. We will try to understand the economic forces driving trends in wages, productivity and innovation across cities and regions. These are the forces that will define the geography of future jobs and will shape the economic destiny of local communities around the world.

EC368-6-AU
International Money and Finance
(15 CREDITS)

How do foreign exchange markets determine trade? Understand the economic role that international currency markets play. Study models to interpret exchange rate movements and how this links to key macroeconomic variables. Analyse real-life policies that respond to events in the international monetary system.

EC371-6-AU
Economic Analysis of Asset Prices
(15 CREDITS)

How do economic theories determine asset prices? Can you apply analytical reasoning to asset pricing problems? Understand capital markets and explore the predictability of asset price changes. Learn to build simple models of asset markets and how to interpret the mathematics of such models in economic terms.

EC372-6-SP
Economics of Financial Markets and Intermediation
(15 CREDITS)

How do you apply economic reasoning to the markets for bonds, futures contracts and financial options? Study the distinctive characteristics of bonds as financial assets. Gain an understanding of derivatives markets, focusing on futures and options. Explore theories of financial intermediation and learn to evaluate models of price determination.

EC386-6-AU
Introduction to Health Economics and Policy
(15 CREDITS)

Why does the government play such an important role in the health care sector? How does the patients’ lack of information affect medical prices? Can we use economics modules to understand the rationale for risky behaviours, such as smoking? These are some of the questions you will try to answer during this module, building on your insights of microeconomic theory, and covering a broad range of concepts, theories, and topics related to the economics of healthcare.

EC387-6-AU
Experimental Methods in Economics
(15 CREDITS)

Experimental Economics has become a very popular method to address questions that are hard to answer with field data. Laboratory experiments are used to investigate individual choice behaviours such as giving to charities, or behaviour in strategic interactions such as financial markets and collective decision making. The experiments are also used to analyse firm behaviour and assess policies such as anti-trust legislation or even monetary policy. In this module, we will critically evaluate whether these experimental methods provide answers for policy makers and private sector decision makers.

EC831-6-FY
Project: Economics
(30 CREDITS)

What interests you? Design and implement your own research project, under the guidance and supervision of our world-leading academic staff. Demonstrate your knowledge of economic ideas in greater depth, building your professional research skills and developing further understanding of a topic that fascinates you.

GV254-6-SP
Ethics and Public Policy
(15 CREDITS)

Is torture ever morally justified? Should pornography be banned? Should prostitution be legalised? Take part in the intellectual search for the moral principles that should govern how we answer these questions and others in governing public policy.

GV300-6-FY
Advanced Quantitative Political Analysis
(30 CREDITS)

Understand how different statistical and experimental methods can be used to answer questions about political phenomena. You evaluate the assumptions of standard statistical tests and the linear regression model, consider alternatives to those, and learn about causal inference.

GV303-6-SP
Electoral Behaviour
(15 CREDITS)

Examine how people reason about voting and politics, and why people vote the way that they do. You consider the effects of institutions such as the electoral system or the number of political parties on voting behaviour, using case studies from elections in Britain and other advanced democracies.

GV307-6-FY
Political Economy
(30 CREDITS)

This module is about modern political economy, meaning analytical approaches to study how economic and political incentives interact to create constraints and opportunities that shape larger political and economic behaviour and outcomes. The module introduces students to the use of rigorous logic and evidence in order to understand classical political economy issues as well as to address contemporary policy issues in both domestic and international dimensions.

GV312-6-AU
Domestic Politics and International Relations
(15 CREDITS)

How do interest groups influence the trajectory of a country's foreign policy? Who benefits and gains from globalisation and how does this affect their political beliefs? In this module you explore how domestic politics and interests influence government's decisions in the international arena, and how international politics affects domestic politics.

GV313-6-AU
Authoritarianism
(15 CREDITS)

Authoritarianism: This module examines authoritarianism, one of the biggest challenges to modern-day democracy. We start by defining autocracy and evaluating alternative measurements of regime type (dictatorship vs. democracy). We then examine the factors that drive politics in dictatorships and look at how these institutions explain the variation in autocratic government performance. Lastly, we consider the conditions under which regime failure (e.g., democratic transitions) are more likely to occur. GV313-SP, Corruption: This module examines corruption, a global problem that is present in dictatorships and democracies, in developing as well as more developed societies. At the extreme, corruption hampers economic development, reinforces social inequality, and undermines democratic development. We start by defining corruption and evaluating alternative measurements of corruption. We then examine the causes and consequences of political and bureaucratic corruption. Last, but not least, we consider existing strategies to contain and control this problem.

GV314-6-AU
International Political Economy
(15 CREDITS)

“Globalisation” encompasses a wide range of phenomena, including increasing global trade, deeper integration of financial markets, increasing foreign direct investment, the spread of multinational corporations, reduced travel, transportation and communication costs, and the emergence of global cultural trends. Globalisation impacts people in many different ways, both positively and negatively. It can enrich our lives, but it may also spur disruption and backlash.

GV315-6-SP
Political Economy of International Development
(15 CREDITS)

The problem of global poverty has come increasingly into focus in recent decades. This module explores the ways in which the wealthy countries of the world, international organizations, non-governmental organizations and civil society in the developing world have tried to catalyse or facilitate economic and human development in the poorer countries around the globe.

GV317-6-SP
Corruption
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you will examine corruption, a global problem that is present in dictatorships as well as democracies, in developing and more developed societies alike. In particular, you'll focus on the impact of corruption on democratic regimes. At the extreme, corruption hampers economic development, reinforces social inequality, and undermines democratic development generally. You will start by defining corruption and discuss alternative tools to evaluate the extent of corruption within a given polity. You'll then examine the causes and consequence of corruption (both political and bureaucratic). Last, but not least, you'll evaluate existing strategies to contain and control this problem.

GV369-6-SP
American Political Institutions
(15 CREDITS)

The American political system is composed of a complicated set of relationships between several different institutions of government.  In this module, we’ll explore how each of the institutions was designed and ask if the design of the American system still functions as intended by the Framers of the Constitution.  Additionally, we discuss what changes have occurred in terms of institutional relationships and what changes are necessary to promote a healthy democracy and a political engaged citizenry.

GV374-6-FY
Democracy and the Media
(30 CREDITS)

The relationship between the media and politics is a complex and important means by which the public are informed on and engaged by political activity. You consider the role of the media and democracy in the UK, and also explore how this functions elsewhere.

GV383-6-AU
German Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that institution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV383-6-FY
German Politics
(30 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that institution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV383-6-SP
German Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that institution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV384-6-SP
Democracy, Dictatorship and Regime Change
(15 CREDITS)

While the number of democratic regimes across the globe grew between the mid-1970s and mid-2000s, it stagnated in the last decade and, now, democracy seems to be under attack even in some of its oldest bastions in North America and Western Europe. This raises a number of fundamental questions. What difference does it make to live in a democracy over a dictatorship? How does democracy emerge and what makes it endure? When do democratic revolutions occur? What do the authoritarians do to prevent them? Can democracy be exported? When and how do democracies break down? These are just some of the questions that will be tackled.

GV385-6-SP
Parliamentary Studies
(15 CREDITS)

This module aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of how the UK Parliament works (in both theory and practice). Subject to validation, this module is co-taught by staff at the Houses of Parliament and has the support of The Speaker and the Clerk of the House in the House of Commons, and the Lord Speaker and the Clerk of the Parliaments in the House of Lords. The module content is delivered collaboratively by the Houses of Parliament and the University of Essex, with the University providing academic and theoretical content and Parliament providing practical and vocational teaching about the work, processes and business of Parliament.

GV505-6-AU
Political Psychology
(15 CREDITS)
GV508-6-SP
The Analysis of Conflict and Peace
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the relationship of power, preferences, economic relations, domestic politics and international organisations in relation to conflict and peace. You investigate the underlying theoretical arguments about war and peace, consider the implications entailed by these different theories, and evaluate these using empirical data.

GV510-6-AU
Democracy, Violence, and Inequality in Latin America
(15 CREDITS)

What are the challenges to democracy in Latin America and how do they prevent democratic consolidation? Gain an introduction to the politics of Latin America and explore the significant challenges to democratic consolidation throughout the region. This module will enable you to be better prepared to tackle complex and important political, economic, and social questions in this dynamic region of the world.

GV517-6-AU
International Security Studies
(15 CREDITS)

The field of security studies has become increasingly important over the last decade. While old conflicts are reigniting and new ones are emerging, scholars and decision-makers debate about changes to the concepts of security, the redundancy of military force, and the centrality of the state in order to face these ever-important issues.

GV517-6-FY
International Security Studies
(30 CREDITS)

The field of security studies has become increasingly important over the last decade. While old conflicts are reigniting and new ones are emerging, scholars and decision-makers debate about changes to the concepts of security, the redundancy of military force, and the centrality of the state in order to face these ever-important issues.

GV522-6-SP
Gender and Armed Conflict
(15 CREDITS)

War narratives and studies of political violence have traditionally focused on the roles and actions of men. Women have typically been framed as innocent bystanders and victims. Yet, women often actively participate in civil wars and in terrorist campaigns, either as civilian supporters of these groups or as armed fighters. In addition to acknowledging the profound impact that civil conflicts have on women, this course explores the many important roles that women often play in terrorist and rebel organizations and examines women's potential contributions to post-war peace building and conflict resolution. The objective of the course is that you will gain a better understanding of the roles women play in the production and resolution of political violence and the manner in which gender and gender attitudes influence war and armed conflict.

GV523-6-AU
The Politics of Modern China
(15 CREDITS)

This module focuses on the politics of the People's Republic of China, with an emphasis on the contemporary effects of the political and economic transitions that occurred during the Reform Era. The purpose of the module is to provide a working knowledge and critical lens for understanding how and why political events and change are occurring in modern China. This module highlights a comparative approach to Chinese politics that seeks to understand how the Chinese case can inform and be informed by existing empirical methods and theories of politics and government.

GV524-6-AU
Gender and Leadership
(15 CREDITS)

This module focuses on the role of women in diverse global leadership positions, including how gender roles and norms have affected the integration and advancement of women in business and governmental organizations. Following an introduction to theories and literature of gender and leadership roles, you will address the empirical record of gender issues in the business, government and international security realms. You will conclude with an evaluation of whether and how gendered leadership leads to distinct policy outcomes and political deliberative processes.

GV525-6-SP
Introduction to Israeli Politics
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you’ll gain an introduction to the domestic politics of Israel in a comparative perspective, including issues of internal cultural diversity, religion and politics, fragmentation of the political party system, and coalition governance. You’ll explore political institutions, parties, and voting behaviour in Israel, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the state of Israel as a democratic country, understand the Israeli political structure, and discuss the electoral arena.

GV526-6-AU
Politics of South Asia
(15 CREDITS)

Almost a quarter of the world’s population resides in South Asia, making it a region that is both densely populated and extremely diverse in ethno-linguistic, social and political terms, on the one hand. On the other hand, a majority of its eight countries share a colonial past and many political institutions, on paper. In this module, you’ll focus on the politics of this complex region, with an emphasis on themes related to political institutions, democratic and autocratic tendencies, civil-military relations, and the role of various social identities in shaping and influencing the political outcomes we see in the region.

GV537-6-FY
State Fragility, State Building and Conflict
(30 CREDITS)

How does state fragility influence the risk of conflict and terrorism? How does the legacy of conflict and violence influence post-conflict state building? What factors promote a durable peace? Study the interplay between state fragility, political and economic development, state building, and conflict.

GV538-6-SP
From Cradle to Grave: Social Justice in Childhood, Adulthood, and Death
(15 CREDITS)

Theories of justice are still being worked on and developed today. You question contemporary theories of justice through applying them to some of the most controversial issues dominating contemporary politics.

GV543-6-AU
Human Rights and Global Justice
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the nature and foundations of international obligations. It asks what we owe to people in other countries, and what they can demand of us as a matter of right. Questions to be addressed include the following: Who owes what to the very poor? Are citizens of affluent countries complicit in the creation and maintenance of world poverty? Does justice demand the elimination of global inequality? Is the promotion of human rights a form of western cultural imperialism? When is international trade unfair? Do states have a right to close their borders to outsiders? Under what conditions (if any) is it permissible to wage war? We will address these questions by considering the answers that they have received in important recent works of normative political theory.

GV591-6-AU
Domestic Environmental Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values, to the environmental movement, to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV591-6-FY
Environmental Politics
(30 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values, to the environmental movement, to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV591-6-SP
Environmental Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values, to the environmental movement, to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV831-6-FY
Research Project: Politics
(30 CREDITS)

Prepare a 10,000 word dissertation which researches the political topic you are most passionate about.

HR308-6-FY
Britain’s Second World War: Mass Observation, Myth and Memory
(30 CREDITS)

This final year module examines and compares the experience of the British people during the Second World War, the myth-making that was a part of this experience, and the shifting cultural memory of the war in Britain from 1945 to the present day. It makes extensive use of the Mass Observation Online Archive (available online via the Albert Sloman library) to examine the British experience of war and to consider how people represented the war themselves. It is a full year Module that, in the first term, focuses on the war years, introducing students to the history of the war, to Mass Observation, and to the processes by which wartime culture created the enduring myths of Dunkirk, the Blitz, the Battle of Britain and the People's War. The module uses Mass Observation alongside other primary sources to consider which stories became a part of these myths, and which were excluded or marginalised. In the second term the focus turns to the cultural memory of the war in Britain since 1945. Students are introduced to concepts and theories of cultural memory that they will go on to apply to representations of the war that are studied. The memory of the war is traced from 1945 to the current day, with themes examined including the popularity of the war film, the mobilisation of the Second World War in Britain's subsequent wars, the growth of the wartime anniversary, museums and memorials, and the 'memory wars' that have been a central aspect of the Brexit debate since 2016.

HR349-6-AU
London 1500-1700: Reformation, Wealth and Destruction
(15 CREDITS)

London is more than just a normal city: its scale, diversity, cultural and economic might put it on a different scale to anywhere else in Britain. This module focuses on the story of London's cultural, economic and political growth, and its relationship with the rest of Britain, and Europe. We explore London's status as a 'free' city, its relationship with the church and Reformation, the life of migrants and marginal communities, theatre and trade.

HR352-6-AU
The Common People: History From Below in Britain 1830-1914
(15 CREDITS)

Britain underwent profound transformations between 1830 and 1950. It became the first indisputably modern, industrial capitalist society in the world. Not only was the environment turned upside down, but the lives and identities of the British people were altered fundamentally. You’ll explore this process in a thematic as well as a chronological manner, and study labour, class, gender, the state, democracy, imperialism, culture, and poverty.

HR366-6-SP
Henry VIII and his reign
(15 CREDITS)
HR371-6-AU
Fictions of Empire
(15 CREDITS)

Our visions of the world, our very sensibilities, have been fashioned to some degree by the imperial world, and yet we are often unaware of this. By considering five works of fiction, you’ll explore key aspects of the imperial experience. You’ll study colonial attitudes and policies, and investigate the experience of colonisers and colonised, mainly in the British Empire. You’ll develop a sense of the complexity of imperialism and its cultural legacy.

HR374-6-SP
Slavery and Plantation Societies in Latin America
(15 CREDITS)

The majority of the 12 million enslaved Africans deported to the Americas during the 16th to the 19th centuries ended up working on plantations in Brazil and the Caribbean. Sugar, cacao, indigo, tobacco, cotton and coffee were the main commodities produced for the rapidly expanding European markets. Slavery in the Americas contributed to the making of the modern world. You’ll examine the different plantation societies in Brazil, British Jamaica, the French Caribbean, and the Spanish colonies (Venezuela and Cuba).

HR619-6-SP
The Russian Revolution 1905-1924
(15 CREDITS)

The Russian Revolution was one of the most important events in the 20th Century. It brought an end to Tsarist rule and gave birth to the first socialist state. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of the Russian Revolution as a larger process that started long before 1917 and did not end in 1917 or even in 1921. You’ll receive an overview of different interpretations, and of former and current scholarly debates.

HR628-6-FY
Witches, Witchcraft and Witch-Hunts in Early Modern Europe and New England
(30 CREDITS)

This module will focus on a phenomenon peculiar to the early modern period: the prosecution of c.100,000-120,000 people for the crime of witchcraft in Europe and its colonies, which resulted in around 50-60,000 executions. In order to understand this phenomenon, and also the regional and chronological variation in witch-trials across Europe during the early modern period.

HR651-6-SP
Unquiet pasts: controversies of twentieth-century Britain
(15 CREDITS)

This module looks at moments in the history of twentieth-century Britain that were not only controversial in their own time, but have continued to trouble us. From the Easter Rising to Hillsborough, this is a past that does not lie quietly. Historians, politicians, the media and the public have all been involved in debating not only 'what actually happened' but also how particular events should be interpreted, where they fit in longer views of British history and what they mean for present-day British society.

HR679-6-AU
Our Voices, Our Pasts, Our Histories: Oral History in Practice
(15 CREDITS)
LA067-6-FY
Translation, Interpreting and Subtitling Skills
(30 CREDITS)

The aim of this module is to provide you with comprehensive practical experience of translating different kinds of texts both from the source language into English and from English into a target language. You will look at a range of texts from news and business correspondence, to manuals, advertising and newspaper clips and develop your ability to reflect on context, purpose, target audience and style, analysing and discussing different alternatives, all relevant for making good choices on translation. It will also introduce you to interpreting and subtitling skills.

LA069-6-FY
Language Dissertation
(30 CREDITS)

What fascinates you? Want to undertake independent study on one or more of your languages? Produce a dissertation, in a foreign language, on a topic of your choice. Remember your dissertation could take the form of a treatise, a translation with commentary, or a piece of video subtitling with commentary.

LA130-6-FY
Higher Intermediate French
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your French comprehension? Improve your spoken and written language skills? Sharpen your grammatical accuracy? Make use of a range of materials to further advance your language abilities, building coherent and cohesive skills for both speaking and writing in French.

LA140-6-FY
Advanced French
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in French? Develop your university-level French language skills, improving your aural comprehension while boosting your grammar knowledge and vocabulary. Learn to appreciate, summarise and evaluate a piece of text. Expand your understanding of French culture and society.

LA150-6-FY
Proficiency Level French
(30 CREDITS)

Are you ready to study abroad? How will it improve your French? Prepare for your period abroad by examining how your language skills will develop, alongside topics related to French gastronomy, music, and suburban life. Study literature, with a focus on creative writing and participate in assessed filmed role-plays.

LA160-6-FY
Mastery Level French
(30 CREDITS)

Want Final Honours level competence in French? Wish to deal quickly and precisely with any written or spoken document? Refine your knowledge of French grammar and vocabulary to near-native level comprehension. Undertake collaborative research into topical issues, and consolidate your understanding of French culture.

LA230-6-FY
Higher Intermediate German
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your German comprehension? Improve your spoken and written language skills? Sharpen your grammatical accuracy? Learn to master complex situations in German and how to deal with extended texts, like newspaper articles. Advance your language abilities, building coherent and cohesive skills for both speaking and writing in German.

LA240-6-FY
Advanced German
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in German? Develop your university-level German language skills so that you are fairly fluent with the ability understand spoken and written work. Be able to express yourself orally and in writing on demanding topics that face modern Germany.

LA250-6-FY
Proficiency Level German
(30 CREDITS)

Want to improve your German? Study a variety of topics, including the environment and German history, to build your vocabulary and knowledge. Learn to interact in everyday situations, as well as in discussions on more specialised topics. Become familiar with more complex grammar, while developing your oral and written skills.

LA260-6-FY
Mastery Level German
(30 CREDITS)

Want Final Honours level competence in German? Wish to deal quickly and precisely with any written or spoken document? Refine your knowledge of German grammar and vocabulary to near-native level comprehension. Undertake collaborative research into topical issues, and consolidate your understanding of German culture.

LA333-6-FY
Spanish / Italian / Romanian to Portuguese Conversion
(30 CREDITS)

Have you knowledge of Spanish, Italian or Romanian? Do you want to speak Portuguese too? Develop advanced written, aural/oral and reading skills, as well as build your knowledge of Brazilian/Portuguese culture and society. Learn to understand short texts, be able to write letters and interact in everyday situations in Portuguese.

LA340-6-FY
Advanced Portuguese
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in Portuguese? Develop your language abilities, expanding your vocabulary and improving your listening and oral skills. Expand your understanding of the Portuguese-speaking culture and history through the use of texts, films and online resources.

LA350-6-FY
Proficiency Level Portuguese
(30 CREDITS)

Want to improve your Portuguese? Study topics within Brazilian and Portuguese culture and society to build your vocabulary and knowledge. Learn to interact in everyday situations, as well as in discussions on more specialised topics. Become familiar with more complex grammar, while developing your oral and written skills.

LA360-6-FY
Mastery Level Portuguese
(30 CREDITS)

Want near-native level competence in Portuguese? Wish to deal quickly and precisely with written or spoken documents? Refine your knowledge of Portuguese grammar and vocabulary by studying different texts. Practice your writing with essays and reports, and take part in discussions to practice expressing yourself clearly in complex situations.

LA430-6-FY
Higher Intermediate Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your Spanish comprehension? Improve your spoken and written language skills? Sharpen your grammatical accuracy? Study topics related to Hispanic culture, starting with text to improve vocabulary and grammar, then undertaking related listening and speaking activities. Build coherent and cohesive skills for both speaking and writing in Spanish.

LA440-6-FY
Advanced Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in Spanish? Develop your language abilities, expanding your vocabulary and improving your listening and oral skills. Expand your understanding of Spanish and Latin American culture and history through the use of texts, films and conversations with native speakers.

LA450-6-FY
Proficiency Level Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want to improve your Spanish? Study topics related to social and historical events in Spanish-speaking societies to build your vocabulary and knowledge. Learn to interact in everyday situations, as well as in discussions on more specialised topics. Become familiar with more complex grammar, while developing your oral and written skills.

LA460-6-FY
Mastery Level Spanish
(30 CREDITS)

Want near-native level competence in Spanish? Wish to deal quickly and precisely with written or spoken documents? Refine your knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary by studying different texts. Practice your writing with essays and reports, and learn to express yourself clearly in complex situations.

LA630-6-FY
Higher Intermediate Italian
(30 CREDITS)

Want to develop your Italian comprehension? Improve your spoken and listening language skills? Be able to communicate effectively with native speakers? Study a range of topics and a variety of texts to build your spoken Italian and reading abilities.

LA640-6-FY
Advanced Italian
(30 CREDITS)

Want to build your confidence when both speaking and writing in Italian? Develop your language abilities, expanding your vocabulary and improving your listening and oral skills. Improve your Italian understanding through reading, analysing and discussing topics in class. Build your awareness of spoken Italian through activities in our multimedia lab.

LA650-6-FY
Proficiency Level Italian
(30 CREDITS)

Want to improve your Italian? Study il giallo italiano detective stories to build your vocabulary and knowledge. Learn to interact in everyday situations, as well as in discussions on more specialised topics. Become familiar with more complex grammar, while developing your oral and written skills.

LA660-6-FY
Mastery Level Italian
(30 CREDITS)

Want near-native level competence in Italian? Wish to deal quickly and precisely with written or spoken documents? Refine your knowledge of Italian grammar and vocabulary by studying different texts. Practice your writing with essays and reports, and take part in debates to build confidence in arguing a point in Italian.

LA930-6-FY
Higher Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
(30 CREDITS)
LG353-6-AU
English in the British Isles
(15 CREDITS)

The module looks at variation in the English Language as it is spoken in the British Isles (England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland), and discusses associated historical and sociolinguistic issues. The focus is on phonological variation, although salient syntactic, morphological and lexical features are also covered, illustrating with recordings wherever possible

LG355-6-SP
English Around the World
(15 CREDITS)

This module looks at varieties of English in North America (USA and Canada), the Southern Hemisphere (Australia, New Zealand and South Africa), and the Caribbean. The module covers the historical development of these varieties and discusses their salient features. The focus is on phonological variation, although syntactic, morphological and lexical features are also considered.

LG357-6-AU
English Intonation
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you will explore phonetic and phonological aspects of rhythm and melody in spoken English. Topics include the inventory, description, and phonological representation of intonational patterns in standard English; rules for phrasal stress assignment; the relationship of prosody with meaning; and intonational variation among English accents.

LG358-6-AU
Language and the Mind
(15 CREDITS)

This module builds on notions and topics approached and developed in psycholinguistics modules in Years 1 and 2. Now that you have an understanding of key concepts and processes, we will focus on current trends and recent research published on a range of aspects in the field. Resolutely driven by current research, the module focuses on how empirical study can advance theories on how language is stored and processed in the mind, how language is learned and how language is used. This will contribute to a more precise grasp of theories of language processing, representation, learning and use.

LG359-6-AU
World Language Structures
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores syntax from a cross-linguistic perspective and provides students with a deeper understanding of syntactic variation. We examine key concepts of grammatical organization as it is exhibited in the languages of the world. We look at syntactic variation, as well as the limits which seem to operate on this variation. We will explore a number of categories and concepts which are challenged when data from a broader range of languages is taken into consideration.

LG361-6-SP
Multilingualism and Translanguaging in Educational and Social Contexts
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores some of the different ways in which bilingualism and multilingualism is/has been understood in different cultural contexts. We will look at some of the different attitudes and expectations around bi/multilingualism and how these give rise to very different social attitudes, social policies as well as personal experiences. We will look at the emergence of the concept of translanguaging and how it is responding to issues of social justice and equality. We will focus in particular on translanguaging and what it offers in terms of classroom practices and pedagogy and what it offers us in terms of our understanding of teaching and learning. Throughout the module we will discuss bi/multilingualism with respect to issues such as identity, power and equality as well as language learning, teaching and educational policy both in England/UK as well as internationally.

LG363-6-AU
Foundations of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)
(15 CREDITS)
LG374-6-AU
Sociolinguistic Perception
(15 CREDITS)

This module will equip you with an overview of variationist sociolinguistic theory and findings, you’ll focus on exploring social and linguistic constraints on variation and addressing contemporary variationist theoretical challenges.

LG378-6-SP
Cognitive Linguistics for Second Language Learning and Teaching
(15 CREDITS)

This module offers an introduction to the discipline of cognitive linguistics and its application to second (L2) language learning and teaching. It focuses on cognitive linguistics views on the nature of language and language learning with specific reference to the L2 context. Cognitive linguistics sees meaning as the core of language both in relation to lexical items and grammar. Meaning is seen as closely related to general knowledge; grammar as shaped and constrained by general cognitive processes, by the needs of speakers in interaction, and by frequency of use. The module covers key concepts in the field, such as conceptualisation and construal, radial networks, encyclopaedic knowledge and its role in language comprehension and production, metaphor and metonymy, and embodied cognition.

LG484-6-SP
Conversation and Social Interaction
(15 CREDITS)

How do we bring off the everyday miracle of having a conversation? This introduction to Conversation Analysis (CA) will examine the mechanics of interaction, showing us with how verbal and non-verbal actions are coordinated in time.

LG490-6-AU
Literature and Language Teaching
(15 CREDITS)

How do you select literature for a language class? What are the distinctive features of literature for classroom use? What practical activities can language teachers undertake using literature? Learn to incorporate literature into the language classroom. Examine novels, poetry and drama, and understand how to use drama in the classroom.

LG831-6-FY
Project: Linguistics
(30 CREDITS)

What fascinates you about linguistics? Work independently on an extended project of your choosing within linguistics, with supervision from our expert staff. Build your subject knowledge, as well as your research skills and project management abilities.

LT320-6-SP
Post-War(s) United States Fiction
(15 CREDITS)

How has the American identity and purpose changed since World War Two? And how is this reflected in literature? Gain answers to these questions via a range of American texts. Analyse these works using a variety of critical approaches, considering social, political and cultural contexts since the Second World War.

LT321-6-SP
Possible Worlds: Science Fiction, Speculative Fiction, and Alternate Histories
(15 CREDITS)
LT347-6-FY
American Film Authors
(30 CREDITS)

How powerful is Hollywood? How do directors construct an image of the USA? Examine how directors have created America in the popular imagination. Study Hollywood auteurs (such as Chaplin, Hawks, Hitchcock, Welles and Ford) alongside others (such as Scorsese, Allen and Lee) while covering the breadth of US film history.

LT359-6-SP
Creative Writing: Oulipo and the Avant Garde
(15 CREDITS)

Are you an experienced writer or beginner? Interested in writing stories or poetry? Science fiction or detective fiction? We offer something for all! Explore the theory and practice of creative writing through the unique work of the Oulipo Workshop of Potential Literature, founded by Raymond Queneau in 1960.

LT364-6-SP
Cyborgs, Clones and the Rise of the Robots: Science Fiction
(15 CREDITS)
LT368-6-AU
Cityscapes of Modernism
(15 CREDITS)

What are the cultural capitals of modernism? How are modernist arts shaped by the metropolitan life experience? Examine literature, film, art and music, studying aesthetic practices and cultural contexts of modernism. Read and discuss cities with vibrant artistic and political activities: New York, Paris, London, Dublin, Vienna, Berlin and Petersburg.

LT372-6-AU
Shakespeare: The Tragedies
(15 CREDITS)

To what degree are Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth and Othello tragedies? How useful is this term in understanding them? Undertake a close reading of Shakespeare’s four great tragedies. Critically discuss recent issues about each, in groups and in your own work. Gain an understanding of their enduring and/or present significance.

LT380-6-AU
"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
(15 CREDITS)

How do US writers imagine and represent the Caribbean? And vice versa? Deepen knowledge of American literature by examining poetic, fictional, nonfictional and dramatic works in a broader context. Investigate contemporary issues like the American Dream, what it means to be from the Americas, migration, and the question of language.

LT380-6-FY
"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
(30 CREDITS)

How do US writers imagine and represent the Caribbean? And vice versa? Deepen knowledge of American literature by examining poetic, fictional, nonfictional and dramatic works in a broader context. Investigate contemporary issues like the American Dream, what it means to be from the Americas, migration, and the question of language.

LT380-6-SP
"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
(15 CREDITS)

How do US writers imagine and represent the Caribbean? And vice versa? Deepen knowledge of American literature by examining poetic, fictional, nonfictional and dramatic works in a broader context. Investigate contemporary issues like the American Dream, what it means to be from the Americas, migration, and the question of language.

LT385-6-SP
The Story and Myth of the West
(15 CREDITS)

Investigate the myths surrounding the founding of the United States. Crossing disciplines of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and cinematic and theatrical texts, you compare the classic Western against a range of counter-narratives from black, Hispanic, latino, and aboriginal storytellers. This module interrogates the concept of a 'national literature', explores the relationship between folklore and contemporary society, and investigates the relationship between the Western as a narrative form, and the history of colonialism in the U.S.A.

LT390-6-AU
The Limits of Representation: The Holocaust in Literature and Film
(15 CREDITS)
LT396-6-AU
Journalism and Storytelling
(15 CREDITS)
MA305-6-AU
Nonlinear Programming
(15 CREDITS)

How do you apply an algorithm or numerical method to a problem? What are the advantages? And the limitations? Understand the theory and application of nonlinear programming. Learn the principles of good modelling and know how to design algorithms and numerical methods. Critically assess issues regarding computational algorithms.

MA306-6-AU
Combinatorial Optimisation
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you will learn what underpins the algorithms used where variables are integer and apply these algorithms to solve integer and mixed integer problems with cutting-plane algorithms.

MA307-6-AU
Advanced Ordinary Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems
(15 CREDITS)

The subject of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) is a very important and fascinating branch in mathematics. An abundance of phenomena in physics, biology, engineering, chemistry, finance and neuroscience to name a few, may be described and studied using such equations. The module will introduce you to advanced topics and theories in ODEs and dynamical systems.

MA311-6-AU
Mathematics of Portfolios
(15 CREDITS)

How do you formulate financial decision problems mathematically? And how do you identify an appropriate method of solution? Understand the basic models and mathematical methods underlying modern portfolio management. Assess the limitations of these models and learn to correctly interpret your results from calculations.

MA314-6-SP
Graph Theory
(15 CREDITS)

Examine key definitions, proofs and proof techniques in graph theory. Gain experience of problems connected with chromatic number. Understand external graph theory, Ramsey theory and the theory of random graphs.

MA315-6-SP
Cryptography and Codes
(15 CREDITS)

How do standard coding techniques in computer security work? And how does RSA cryptography work? Examine the principles of cryptography and the mathematical principles of discrete coding. Analsye the concepts of error detection and correction. Understand the algebra and number theory used in modern cryptography and coding schemes.

MA316-6-AU
Commutative Algebra
(15 CREDITS)

Commutative algebra is the cornerstone established by Hilbert to give a formal backing to intuitive arguments in geometry. This module will provide you with a solid foundation of commutative rings and module theory, as well as help developing foundational notions helpful in other areas such as number theory, algebraic geometry, and homological algebra. Examples will be key, many of them will be made ‘graphic’ thanks to Hilbert’s Nullstellensatz.

MA318-6-AU
Statistical Methods
(15 CREDITS)

This module will enable you to expand your knowledge on multiple statistical methods. You will learn the concepts of decision theory and how to apply them, have the chance to explore “Monte Carlo” simulation, and develop an understanding of Bayesian inference, and the basic concepts of a generalised linear model.

MA319-6-AU
Stochastic Processes
(15 CREDITS)

Ever considered becoming an Actuary? This module covers the required material for the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries CT4 and CT6 syllabus. It explores the stochastic process and principles of actuarial modelling alongside time series models and analysis.

MA320-6-SP
Financial Derivatives
(15 CREDITS)

Why are arbitrage arguments important in modern finance? How can a binomial model evaluate derivatives? What are the main models for interest rates? Understand the mathematical techniques underlying the modelling of derivative pricing. Acquire skills in the development of pricing and risk management. Explore stochastic methods and credit risk.

MA321-6-SP
Applied Statistics
(15 CREDITS)

How do you apply multivariate methods? Or demographical and epidemiological methods? And how do you apply sampling methods? Study three application areas of statistics – multivariate methods, demography and epidemiology, and sampling. Understand how to apply and assess these methods in a variety of situations.

MA322-6-SP
Bayesian Computational Statistics
(15 CREDITS)

What do you understand about Bayes’ theorem and Bayesian statistical modelling? Or about Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation? Focus on Bayesian and computational statistics. Understand the statistical modelling and methods available. Learn to develop a Monte Carlo simulation algorithm for simple probability distributions.

MA323-6-SP
Partial Differential Equations
(15 CREDITS)

This module will cover partial differential equations (PDEs), which can describe a majority of physical processes and phenomena. You will learn the properties of first and second order PDEs, the concepts behind them and the methods for solving such equations.

PA208-6-AU
Freud: Mind, Culture and Society
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Freud’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

PA209-6-SP
The Unconscious: Analytical Psychology, Culture and Society - Jung
(15 CREDITS)

What do you know about depth psychology? How do psychoanalysis and analytical psychology provide new understanding of society, culture and politics? Build your knowledge about depth psychology - psychological thinking that introduces the concept of a deep unconscious. Understand Jung’s theories and their significance in social and cultural analysis.

PS486-6-AU
Culture and Psychology
(15 CREDITS)

Examine how culture shapes cognition, perception, motivation, and emotion in this advanced module on culture and psychology. You will learn about culture and health, cross-cultural difference in ideas of the self, personality, interpersonal behaviour, and group processes, and will discuss how culture impacts individuals, and interpersonal and intergroup processes.

PS487-6-AU
Emotion
(15 CREDITS)

This module is concerned with the study of emotional behaviour and experience from a scientific point of view. The emphasis throughout the module is on how emotions arise and are manifest as patterns of bodily response and mental activity. Theories of emotion from psychodynamic, introspective, and constructionist positions will not form a major component of the module, although some of the important insights which these approaches have offered will be considered. You will examine theories of both normal and abnormal emotion. The former will receive the lion's share of our attention, but the case studies on particular emotions (eg sadness) include discussion of their pathological extensions (depression).

PS489-6-SP
Animal Behaviour
(15 CREDITS)

Be introduced to the key concepts of animal behaviour from an ethological and comparative cognition viewpoint. By taking a critical look at published work and research and identifying the frameworks that underlie animal behaviour, you will become familiar with aspects such as the evolution of behaviour and the cognitive capabilities of different species.

PS490-6-AU
Evolutionary Psychology: How natural and sexual selection helped shape the human mind
(15 CREDITS)

You’ll be introduced to the key concepts of evolutionary theory as pertaining to human psychology, and will engage with current literature in this rapidly advancing area of science. You will develop your understanding of the relevance of evolution to the scientific study of human behaviour and cognition. You’ll also identify the basic concepts and frameworks that underlie evolutionary approaches to psychology, as well as the major findings and fields within evolutionary psychology.

PS492-6-FY
Advanced employability skills and career progression
(0 CREDITS)

It’s important to plan your career. This is the one of three modules that will make sure you are career ready when you leave university. You will decide on your career aspirations and goals, plan how you will achieve them and identify the resources available to help you.

PS495-6-SP
The Neuroscience of Human Nature
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the neuroscience behind key elements of human nature. These include, understanding the faces and bodies of others, how we copy body language to show empathy and the processes that drive motivation and emotion. You will also investigate autism and schizophrenia which occur when these processes aren’t working effectively.

PS498-6-AU
Human Sexuality
(15 CREDITS)

Is human sexuality shaped by nature or nurture? Why do men and women differ in their sexuality? What are the consequences of sexual assault? These are just some of the questions you will tackle during this module, which provides an in-depth exploration into the science of human sexuality. You’ll learn to interpret systematic research, and will have the chance to voice your own opinions and insights into this topic.

PS502-6-SP
Body, Senses and Existence
(15 CREDITS)

Develop knowledge gained in the second year module, Brain and Behaviour, and deepen your understanding of how the brain affects behaviour, and the link it has with the workings of the body. You will learn from a range of experts, covering aspects from basic bodily functions to high-order existential concerns, such as psychopharmacology, diet and wellbeing, epigenetics, physical and social pain, and existential neuroscience, to ultimately gain a deep understanding of the way the brain and body interact to control behaviour.

PS504-6-AU
Psychopathology
(15 CREDITS)

You will examine the causes of psychopathology from the perspective of different disciplines (genetics, neuroscience, behavioural, and social sciences), with the aim of understanding the potential interplay between biological, psychological, social, and environmental factors. You will learn how to critically distinguish individual differences in behaviour and the different ways of classifying psychopathologies.

PS507-6-SP
Making connections: How children develop
(15 CREDITS)

You will gain a greater understanding of the relation between brain development and the development of skills in infants and children, and of how neuroscience can inform educational practices. Topics may include: prenatal brain development, the development of the sense of self and self control, infant and children attachment and social skills, neuro-developmental disorders and applied neuroscience.

PS509-6-AU
The science of uncertainty
(15 CREDITS)

The use of Bayesian statistics is increasingly common in psychology. This module aims to introduce you to these tools, and how to use R (a popular, open source statistical software package) to analyse and visualise data. It will also give you an overview of how the human brain deals with uncertainty and probabilities, and how the media often misrepresents statistical issues. Throughout the module, you will gain familiarity with working with large datasets, identifying patterns and presenting data. These skills are useful not only for further postgraduate study, but also are increasingly valuable in graduate jobs outside academia.

PS510-6-AU
Positive Psychology: The Science of Well-Being
(15 CREDITS)
PS511-6-SP
What's Love Got To Do With It? Understanding Romantic Relationships.
(15 CREDITS)
PS512-6-SP
Decision making science in theory and practice
(15 CREDITS)

Can psychology help make better decisions? Yes! From curbing climate change to selecting the best candidate for the job, decision-making science has many important insights to offer, which is why it is becoming increasingly popular in education, politics, business, economics and health. Governments, businesses and charities all understand the value of identifying decision pitfalls (eg social and cognitive biases) and using strategies to overcome these. In this module, you will learn about decision-making theories and gain the skills to understand, predict and improve people's decisions for real-world issues (eg "how can we help doctors better diagnose patients?", "how do we motivate people to exercise more often?", "how can we encourage people to be more prosocial?").

PY402-6-SP
Kierkegaard
(15 CREDITS)

his module introduces the work of the 19thcentury Danish thinker, Søren Kierkegaard, against the background of debates around ‘the crisis of modernity’. Topics covered include: melancholy, boredom, the limits of reason, subjectivity and truth.

PY413-6-SP
Contemporary Political Philosophy
(15 CREDITS)

How should theory and theorists relate to real politics? What are the competing approaches in contemporary philosophy?

PY418-6-SP
Philosophy of Mind
(15 CREDITS)

What is the mind? In this module, you consider different ways of conceiving the distinction between the mental and the non-mental, the nature of consciousness, the nature and structure of mental content or representation, the relation between reasoning and consciousness, how the body shapes the mind, the nature of the self and self-awareness, and many other fascinating issues. As you study these topics, you will also learn about a variety of classic and contemporary Analytic and phenomenological approaches to the mind.

PY426-6-SP
Philosophy Dissertation
(15 CREDITS)

Develop your research and written skills through writing a dissertation on a philosophical topic studied in either your second year or the autumn term of your final year.

PY427-6-SP
Topics in the Philosophy of Religion
(15 CREDITS)

What is Islamic philosophy? How did early Muslim thinkers adapt and develop the insights of ancient Greek philosophers? How did Islamic philosophers approach issues such as free will, the good life, sexuality or the role of women? Why are the answers to some of these questions so different from what many people today might assume?

PY428-6-AU
Philosophy and Medical Ethics
(15 CREDITS)

Discover the philosophical questions that are raised by everyday medical practice and recent developments in medical science. You consider topics including suicide, euthanasia, abortion, cloning, reproductive medicine, resource allocation, medical research, confidentiality, patient autonomy, and biopolitics.

PY453-6-AU
Feminism
(15 CREDITS)

How and why are women oppressed? What is a “woman”, and should we even use the term? This module will look at some of the main strands in modern feminist theory, and explore the different ways in which they understand the nature, role and objectives of feminism. Along the way, we will discuss the intersection between gender and other axes of oppression, such as race and class.

PY454-6-AU
Phenomenology and Existentialism
(15 CREDITS)

Existentialism encompasses a variety of different thinkers unified by a.) the belief that human existence cannot be fully understood using the categories provided by the philosophical tradition or the natural sciences, and b.) a commitment to taking seriously the first-person quality of experience as it is lived. For this reason Existentialism has close ties to Phenomenology, which is a philosophical methodology defined by its insistence on examining meaning as it is experienced first-personally in order to uncover the structures governing the possibility of those meaningful experiences. In this module we will closely study one or more of the leading figures of these two inter-related philosophical movements. In 2021-2022, we will focus on Emmanuel Levinas’ major work, Totality and Infinity.

PY500-6-AU
Kant's Revolution in Philosophy
(15 CREDITS)

Kant's Critique of Pure Reason initiates a new 'critical' method in philosophy which has been highly influential in both continental and analytic philosophy. His critical method establishes a new way of thinking about the relation in which we stand to the world, and the role played by knowledge and judgement within that world.

SC301-6-FY
Current Disputes in Sociology: Sociological Analysis III
(30 CREDITS)

How do you understand contemporary society? What role do key topics like modernity, post-modernity, feminism and capitalism play? And what do contemporary theorists like Foucault and Bourdieu say? Learn why philosophical knowledge is vital for sociological understanding, while deepening your own awareness of the subject.

SC304-6-FY
Globalisation and Crime
(30 CREDITS)

What effect does globalisation have on crime and justice? How do we deal with global crime issues, like terrorism or illegal migration? Can we prevent large-scale crime, such as genocide? Study the changing nature of criminology, looking at contemporary developments, alongside the problem of balancing human rights with human security.

SC304-6-SP
Globalisation and Crime
(15 CREDITS)

What effect does globalisation have on crime and justice? How do we deal with global crime issues, like terrorism or illegal migration? Can we prevent large-scale crime, such as genocide? Study the changing nature of criminology, looking at contemporary developments, alongside the problem of balancing human rights with human security.

SC306-6-AU
Crime, Media and Culture
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, we want to enable you to critically assess contemporary thinking and research on the relationships between crime, media and culture. These relationships have long been the subject of intense debate and this option offers an account of crime stories in the media that is more interested in their social character: the ways they are produced, circulated and read. In doing so it will also move beyond their symbolic meaning – by emphasising the work such stories perform in the wider social order, how they alter over time, shape political processes and clarify moral boundaries.

SC311-6-SP
Children and Young People: Criminological Approaches - Current Debates
(15 CREDITS)

Discover how questions of childhood and youth have driven wider debates in criminology and sociology. Ask why, how, and with what, effects children and young people have been constructed as subjects with rights, relational citizens with needs, offenders to be reformed or punished, and victims to be protected. Explore children and young people’s experiences of (il)legal youth cultures, systems of youth justice, education, child protection, family intervention and other efforts to counter social exclusion.

SC326-6-AU
Psychiatry and Mental Illness
(15 CREDITS)

How has the concept of mental health been developed by psychiatrists? What role do genetic, psychological, social and cultural factors play in causing mental illness? How has mental health treatment developed? Critically examine mental illness, psychiatric thinking and practice, and mental health services, using real-life examples in your debates.

SC326-6-FY
Psychiatry and Mental Illness
(30 CREDITS)

How has the concept of mental health been developed by psychiatrists? What role do genetic, psychological, social and cultural factors play in causing mental illness? How has mental health treatment developed? Critically examine mental illness, psychiatric thinking and practice, and mental health services, using real-life examples in your debates.

SC326-6-SP
Psychiatry and Mental Illness
(15 CREDITS)

How has the concept of mental health been developed by psychiatrists? What role do genetic, psychological, social and cultural factors play in causing mental illness? How has mental health treatment developed? Critically examine mental illness, psychiatric thinking and practice, and mental health services, using real-life examples in your debates.

SC340-6-FY
The Current Issues in Social Science
(30 CREDITS)

This module gives students an opportunity to apply social science to address key issues facing society at the local, national and global level. For example, what is the impact of the war in Yemen or in Syria? What is the impact of Brexit? How does global warming affect us? What are the major challenges in the 21st century? This module will tackle a different theme each term to better understand how Social Science can be used to understand the big issues.

SC361-6-AU
American Society: Ethnic Encounters in the Making of the USA
(15 CREDITS)

What is it to be an American Indian today? Has the slavery legacy contributed to contemporary debates on criminal justice? What are the politics for a Latino presence? Examine social, political and economic encounters between European settlers, American Indians, African-Americans and Latinos that shaped the USA, from colonisation to today.

SC361-6-FY
American Society: Ethnic Encounters in the Making of the USA
(30 CREDITS)

What is it to be an American Indian today? Has the slavery legacy contributed to contemporary debates on criminal justice? What are the politics for a Latino presence? Examine social, political and economic encounters between European settlers, American Indians, African-Americans and Latinos that shaped the USA, from colonisation to today.

SC361-6-SP
American Society: Ethnic Encounters in the Making of the USA
(15 CREDITS)

What is it to be an American Indian today? Has the slavery legacy contributed to contemporary debates on criminal justice? What are the politics for a Latino presence? Examine social, political and economic encounters between European settlers, American Indians, African-Americans and Latinos that shaped the USA, from colonisation to today.

SC362-6-SP
Visual Cultures: the Social Meanings of Photography and Art
(15 CREDITS)

This module examines how photography and other forms of visual art provide meanings and interpretations of societies.

SC364-6-AU
Mass Media and Modern Life
(15 CREDITS)

What impact has the printed press had on our social and cultural life? What about radio, cinema, TV and recorded music? And how important is all this in the light of new technological advancements? Examine the development of our mass media culture, from the nineteenth century to the present day.

SC364-6-FY
Mass Media and Modern Life
(30 CREDITS)

What impact has the printed press had on our social and cultural life? What about radio, cinema, TV and recorded music? And how important is all this in the light of new technological advancements? Examine the development of our mass media culture, from the nineteenth century to the present day.

SC364-6-SP
Mass Media and Modern Life
(15 CREDITS)

What impact has the printed press had on our social and cultural life? What about radio, cinema, TV and recorded music? And how important is all this in the light of new technological advancements? Examine the development of our mass media culture, from the nineteenth century to the present day.

SC382-6-AU
Crime, Policy and Social Justice
(15 CREDITS)

Should criminal justice systems only manage offenders and victims? What wider role could they play in securing social justice? Explore the history of criminal justice and examine key theories within an international dimension. Find out how our current criminal justice policies are framed, funded and fought out.

SC382-6-FY
Crime, Policy and Social Justice
(30 CREDITS)

Should criminal justice systems only manage offenders and victims? What wider role could they play in securing social justice? Explore the history of criminal justice and examine key theories within an international dimension. Find out how our current criminal justice policies are framed, funded and fought out.

SC385-6-AU
Models and Measurement in Quantitative Sociology
(15 CREDITS)

The first term of the module begins with simple OLS regression and provides a framework for modelling strategy and variable selection. Students are then taken through extensions to the basic OLS model, with categorical predictors, interactions and non-linear terms. Next, we introduce models for categorical outcomes: binary logistic and multinomial logit. The term concludes with a discussion of practical topics in data analysis - how to deal with complex sample designs, weighting and non-response adjustments.

SC385-6-FY
Models and Measurement in Quantitative Sociology
(30 CREDITS)

The first term of the module begins with simple OLS regression and provides a framework for modelling strategy and variable selection. Students are then taken through extensions to the basic OLS model, with categorical predictors, interactions and non-linear terms. Next, we introduce models for categorical outcomes: binary logistic and multinomial logit. The term concludes with a discussion of practical topics in data analysis - how to deal with complex sample designs, weighting and non-response adjustments.

SC387-6-AU
War and Trauma in the Modern Age
(15 CREDITS)

What is ‘trauma’ and how is its history connected to that of war in the modern age? How have stories of trauma become a feature of contemporary society, and why? This module traces the history of trauma in the age of ‘total war’, from the two World Wars, through the Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan conflicts, to the present, linking the history and sociology of medicine to the cultural and social history of modern warfare.

SC387-6-FY
War and Trauma in the Modern Age
(30 CREDITS)

What is ‘trauma’ and how is its history connected to that of war in the modern age? How have stories of trauma become a feature of contemporary society, and why? This module traces the history of trauma in the age of ‘total war’, from the two World Wars, through the Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan conflicts, to the present, linking the history and sociology of medicine to the cultural and social history of modern warfare.

SC387-6-SP
War and Trauma in the Modern Age
(15 CREDITS)

What is ‘trauma’ and how is its history connected to that of war in the modern age? How have stories of trauma become a feature of contemporary society, and why? This module traces the history of trauma in the age of ‘total war’, from the two World Wars, through the Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan conflicts, to the present, linking the history and sociology of medicine to the cultural and social history of modern warfare.

SC388-6-AU
Dangerous Places: Intercultural Meetings In Film, Exploration and Anthropology
(15 CREDITS)

What did the first anthropologists, discovering places outside Europe, say in their biographies? How does this contrast with contemporary anthropologists? What did the first explorers put in their travel reports? Or early missionaries in their diaries? Study primary source materials, plus films, to learn more about depictions of other societies.

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