MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Literature and Sociology options

Year 2, Component 04

LT210-5-AU or LT218-5-AU or LT248-5-AU or LT268-5-AU
LT210-5-AU
Love and Death in the Renaissance
(15 CREDITS)

A century of religious, philosophical and political turmoil, the Renaissance was also the age of the great flourishing of the English stage and English verse. In this module you will study Renaissance love poetry and learn about the sonnet, court literature, and the circulation of manuscripts. You will learn about the great writers of the canon, and some less familiar figures too, such as the female writers, who appropriated literary forms conventionally associated with men, and turned them to their own ends. Moving from the focus on “love”, to the darker theme of “death”, some of the most extraordinary literature of this time is engaged with the religious turmoil and culture of martyrdom associated with the Reformation. Finally, bringing these themes together, this module also explores Renaissance innovation in the theatre, and the revenge play, in which love, desire and death are intermingled and intertwined to horrifying effect.

LT218-5-AU
Black Lives Represented: Writing, Art, Politics and Society
(15 CREDITS)
LT248-5-AU
Modernism
(15 CREDITS)

This module offers a varied, wide-ranging introduction to the literature of the modernist period, beginning in the late nineteenth century and extending through to the early 1950s. Modernist literature is defined by its emphasis on innovation and experimentation in both form and content. Modernist authors wrote from out of a widespread sense that the world they inhabited was undergoing profound and unprecedented change, and that literature would need to adapt to the unique circumstances of the early twentieth century if it was to continue to speak to modern readers. One way in which they did this was to write on subjects which had been neglected or ignored by previous generations of writers, or which had been considered unsuitable for treatment in high culture.

LT268-5-AU
Gothic Literature
(15 CREDITS)

What compels De Monfort's murderous hate? What tragedy has broken Martha Ray? Why does the Ancient Mariner kill the albatross? At the heart of Gothic literature lies a mystery--one that often remains inexplicable; one that harries, harasses, and haunts characters; and one that drives them, often, to acts of horrible violence. And yet, there is something perversely attractive about this compulsion that licenses desires normally repressed or curbed, desires the existence of which we may not wish even to acknowledge. As a window into the gory crypt of the soul, Gothic literature invades our privacy and makes us squirm in light of what it discovers. To this end, the artworks studied in this module touch on such topics as sexuality, deviancy, monstrosity, madness, and the supernatural. The Gothic revival in England is a late eighteenth-century phenomenon, hence the focus on this time period. We will, however, also reach forward into the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries to explore some of the Gothic's hideous progeny.

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