Component

MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Modern History and International Relations options

Final Year, Component 02

Government option(s) from list
GV313-6-AU
Authoritarianism
(15 CREDITS)

Authoritarianism: This module examines authoritarianism, one of the biggest challenges to modern-day democracy. We start by defining autocracy and evaluating alternative measurements of regime type (dictatorship vs. democracy). We then examine the factors that drive politics in dictatorships. In particular, we focus on why dictators often rule with nominally democratic institutions. We analyse why and how such institutions are set up, what explains variation in how they are utilised, and what the effects of such institutions are on regime longevity and government performance. Lastly, we consider the conditions under which regime failure (e.g., democratic transitions) are more likely to occur.

GV317-6-SP
Corruption
(15 CREDITS)

In this module you will examine corruption, a global problem that is present in dictatorships as well as democracies, in developing and more developed societies alike. In particular, you'll focus on the impact of corruption on democratic regimes. At the extreme, corruption hampers economic development, reinforces social inequality, and undermines democratic development generally. You will start by defining corruption and discuss alternative tools to evaluate the extent of corruption within a given polity. You'll then examine the causes and consequence of corruption (both political and bureaucratic). Last, but not least, you'll evaluate existing strategies to contain and control this problem.

GV383-6-AU
German Politics I
(15 CREDITS)

Explore the democratisation of West Germany through investigating the role of the constitution formed against anti-democratic forces, the institutions created by that constitution, the emergence of political parties and social movements as the main channels for participation, and the transformation of Germany’s traditional subject culture into a civic culture.

GV386-6-SP
German Politics II
(15 CREDITS)

The aim of this module is to provide a profound understanding of contemporary German politics. For this purpose, it will give an overview over Germany’s post-war political development, institutional design, and electoral as well as party system. It addresses why Germany is considered a ‘militant democracy’ and the country’s interlocked decision-making process. The module sheds light on general trends and developments that Germany shares with other countries, such as the increasing fluidity of electoral preferences, the fragmentation of the party system, the ramification of the climate crisis and increasing social disparity. At the same time, the module outlines and discusses some of the more distinct features of the German case, such as the country’s social and economic model or its special role on the international stage. Apart from that, the module explores critical policy issues and current challenges including Germany’s environmental, welfare, and immigration policies. Contextualising and discussing current events in German politics will also be an integral part of this module.

GV510-6-AU
Democracy, Violence, and Inequality in Latin America
(15 CREDITS)

What are the challenges to democracy in Latin America and how do they prevent democratic consolidation? Gain an introduction to the politics of Latin America and explore the significant challenges to democratic consolidation throughout the region. This module will enable you to be better prepared to tackle complex and important political, economic, and social questions in this dynamic region of the world.

GV517-6-SP
International Security Studies
(15 CREDITS)

The field of security studies has become increasingly important over the last decade. While old conflicts are reigniting and new ones are emerging, scholars and decision-makers debate about changes to the concepts of security, the redundancy of military force, and the centrality of the state in order to face these ever-important issues.

GV525-6-SP
Israeli Politics
(15 CREDITS)

In this module, you’ll gain an introduction to the domestic politics of Israel in a comparative perspective, including issues of internal cultural diversity, religion and politics, fragmentation of the political party system, and coalition governance. You’ll explore political institutions, parties, and voting behaviour in Israel, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the state of Israel as a democratic country, understand the Israeli political structure, and discuss the electoral arena.

GV543-6-AU
Human Rights and Global Justice
(15 CREDITS)

This module explores the nature and foundations of international obligations. It asks what we owe to people in other countries, and what they can demand of us as a matter of right. Questions to be addressed include the following: Who owes what to the very poor? Are citizens of affluent countries complicit in the creation and maintenance of world poverty? Does justice demand the elimination of global inequality? Is the promotion of human rights a form of western cultural imperialism? When is international trade unfair? Do states have a right to close their borders to outsiders? Under what conditions (if any) is it permissible to wage war? We will address these questions by considering the answers that they have received in important recent works of normative political theory.

GV591-6-AU
Comparative Environmental Politics
(15 CREDITS)

Study one of the most important contemporary aspects of political action: the natural environment. You consider the state of the environment and possible paths along which it might change, before exploring environmental policies from the level of individual values to the environmental movement to political parties, and finally to the level of international affairs.

GV592-6-SP
International Environmental Politics
(15 CREDITS)

This module provides a better understanding of democratic political and economic processes in Europe. In the first part, you will compare representative democracy with direct democracy instruments and analyse under what circumstances referendums are suitable for making political decisions. As corruption is a perpetual threat for democracies, you will examine what types of corruption are prevalent in Europe, how they are measured, and which accountability mechanisms have proved effective at curbing corrupt behaviour. You will then examine the institutional foundations of welfare-capitalism, analysing how coordinated and liberal capitalism types responded to challenges such as globalisation and deindustrialization. The second part of the module is devoted to studying the power-sharing arrangements in the European Union. In this context, you will examine under what circumstances member states may decide to delegate powers to the EU level or alternatively re-nationalize supranational powers. The module also provides an accessible introduction to research design and methods that political scientists have used to address these topics.

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