MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Sociology and Politics options

Year 2, Component 04

SC203-5-FY or SC208-5-FY or (GV207-5-AU and GV252-5-SP)
GV207-5-AU
Quantitative Political Analysis
(15 CREDITS)

How can we answer political questions using statistical data? Learn how to find relevant research designs and questions in order to use quantitative methods in political research, assisting you in your other modules and improving your job prospects.

GV252-5-SP
Discourse, Morality and Power
(15 CREDITS)

Understand how politics and social life is shaped by language and meaning. Draw out the implications of political speech, social norms, and debate for how we act and think as citizens and social beings as you explore the intimate relationship between political rhetoric, discourse and power.

SC203-5-FY
Researching Social Life II
(30 CREDITS)

What methods are used in carrying out empirical sociological research? How do you critically analyse approaches to social research? And what are the skills required to undertake such research? We introduce the statistical foundations for empirical research and methods of analysis for qualitative data, building practical skills for your final-year project.

SC208-5-FY
Quantitative Research on Social Stratification: Inequalities from Cradle to Grave
(30 CREDITS)

How does stratification lead to inequality in education? Is there social mobility between generations? Do early life experiences influence your later choices and decisions? Examine sociological empirical research on class, gender, and racial inequalities across the life course. Engage with the evidence to formulate your own research questions and hypotheses.

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