MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA Sociology with Social Psychology options

Year 2, Component 04

HSC, Psychology or Sociology option(s) from list
PS212-5-FY
Statistics for Psychologists, 2nd Year
(30 CREDITS)

Building upon the statistics knowledge gained in your first year this module combines statistics lectures with computer workshops. You will be taught the data analysis skills and underlying principles needed to carry out a range of statistical tests. There are a number of studying formats from group and peer collaboration, observing graduate demonstrations and computer work, which will give you the opportunity to question and analyse the work you have done so far.

PS406-5-AU
Developmental Psychology
(15 CREDITS)

Explore classical and contemporary themes of child development such as prenatal and perceptual development, early language acquisition, and cognitive and social development, whilst examining the research methods and designs employed in Developmental Psychology.

PS407-5-AU
Social Psychology
(15 CREDITS)

Through exploring and addressing a range of theories and research on how people think and behave, you will gain a clear understanding of the topics social psychologists are interested in and their approaches to studying them.

PS411-5-SP
Brain and Behaviour
(15 CREDITS)

The brain is an extremely complex organ, and there is much that we still have to learn about its processes and functions. This module will detail the psychological mechanisms that underlie human behaviour and highlight the possibility that even our deepest thoughts and feelings arise from electrical and chemical activity in our brains.

PS414-5-AU
Seeing and Hearing
(15 CREDITS)

This module will introduce you to cognitive psychology and covers major areas such as visual and auditory perception, and visual cognition. Through a series of laboratory sessions you will study the methods, theory and data underpinning our understanding of the processes involved in visual and auditory perception, and visual cognition.

PS415-5-SP
Memory Attention and Language
(15 CREDITS)

Building on your knowledge from Cognitive Psychology 1, this module covers the major areas of cognitive psychology such as language, memory, and attention. You will develop your understanding of the psychological theories and data related to major areas of cognitive psychology.

PS416-5-SP
Personality and Individual Differences
(15 CREDITS)

An in-depth look into cognitive, trait and biological theories and approaches to personality, individual differences and intelligence. This module will also give you the opportunity to cover and debate contemporary topics in individual intelligence (such as how individual differences explain behaviours, feelings and thinking).

SC201-5-FY
Continuity and Controversy in Sociology: Sociological Analysis II
(30 CREDITS)

Want to study sociological classics? Wish to read and interpret original texts by Marx, Durkheim and Weber? Then study a selection of the contemporary writers who followed? We look at classic and modern thinkers, carrying their ideas into new contexts and inverting approaches to social understanding.

SC203-5-FY
Researching Social Life II
(30 CREDITS)

What methods are used in carrying out empirical sociological research? How do you critically analyse approaches to social research? And what are the skills required to undertake such research? We introduce the statistical foundations for empirical research and methods of analysis for qualitative data, building practical skills for your final-year project.

SC204-5-FY
Sociology of Crime and Control
(30 CREDITS)

You will examine key theories and trends in criminological thought, including the historical development of criminology and some of the more recent critiques. The themes of causation, criminalisation, correction and control run throughout the theoretical perspectives and are considered alongside some specific examples of criminal activity and organisation. Examples range from the individually-experienced through the structural inequalities relevant to understanding gender, ethnicity and crime and include the global dimensions.

SC205-5-FY
Policing, Punishment and Society
(30 CREDITS)

What is wrong with using punishment as a criminal justice institution? How is punishment a social phenomenon? What are the formal elements of punishment? And how does punishment fit into our wider social world? Study the problem of punishment in a philosophical, social and contemporary context.

SC207-5-FY
Social Data Science: Code, Text and Networks
(30 CREDITS)

With research methods rapidly changing in response to the large-scale generation of data within society, Social Science needs to ensure it is engaged with new digital methods to both benefit from them, and to shape them. In this module students will learn to combine their growing knowledge about society, social processes and research design, with powerful tools to both draw on and analyse the vast amounts and forms of new social data in a way that is With research methods rapidly changing in response to the large-scale generation of data within society, Social Science needs to ensure it is engaged with new digital methods to both benefit from them, and to shape them. In this module students will learn to combine their growing knowledge about society, social processes and research design, with powerful tools to both draw on and analyse the vast amounts and forms of new social data in a way that is critical, ethical and valuable.

SC208-5-FY
Quantitative Research on Social Stratification: Inequalities from Cradle to Grave
(30 CREDITS)

How does stratification lead to inequality in education? Is there social mobility between generations? Do early life experiences influence your later choices and decisions? Examine sociological empirical research on class, gender, and racial inequalities across the life course. Engage with the evidence to formulate your own research questions and hypotheses.

SC210-5-FY
Ethnographic Explorations of the City
(30 CREDITS)

In the past few decades an unprecedented demographic change has taken place. For most of human history that vast majority of the world`s population lived in rural areas. Now, over half of the world's population lives in cities, and the United Nations predicts that this proportion will increase to over 70% by 2050. This development raises a fundamental challenge to ethnographic practice and anthropological theory, which has historically focused on the life ways and societies of rural areas. Increasingly anthropologists have to come to terms with highly complex urban assemblages that are, paradoxically both longstanding and deeply unstable. Cities are contested spaces. They are sites of intense social, political and economic struggles, which are waged by coalitions of actors representing a wide variety of sometimes complimentary and sometimes contradictory set of interests, with battle lines being continually drawn and redrawn in relation to a shifting social terrain. By utilising a wide range of readings and examples including both the global north and the global south, this module will ask how we are to understand these developments anthropologically.

SC213-5-FY
Social Psychology (Sociology): Self and Interaction
(30 CREDITS)

Want to study Freud’s psychoanalytic theories? Interested in the Marxist social psychology of Vygotsky and Luria? Curious about developmental psychologies by Piaget and Kohlberg? We study theories of sociological social psychology that relate to the self and social interaction, and apply these themes to the understanding of social life.

SC224-5-FY
Digital Society
(30 CREDITS)

Does technology determine history? Can games teach us about power? Does software shape society? Develop a critical understanding of the role played by human-machine relationships in contemporary cultural change. Evaluate recent developments in media technologies from a sociological perspective. Develop your own blog as part of your final assessment.

SC233-5-FY
Race, Class and Gender
(30 CREDITS)

What are the problems with class analysis? And how can you understand citizenship rights? Are they useful for analysing inclusion and exclusion, how do they relate to gender, and where does migration fit into the picture? Build your understanding of race, class and gender by learning more about how these concepts relate to social inequality, rights and identity.

SC277-5-FY
Ethnographic Research Methods
(30 CREDITS)

What research methods do anthropologists use and why? When is participant observation appropriate and what are the ethical issues involved? Gain an introduction to the research methods and practical issues that revolve around anthropological fieldwork, as well as building your understanding of the theoretical and ethical implications.

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