Clearing 2021
MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
MSc Finance and Investment options

Year 1, Component 06

BE161-7-AU and/or BE162-7-AU and/or EBS (Colchester Campus) option(s) from list
BE161-7-AU
Corporate Reporting and Analysis
(20 CREDITS)

This module introduces you to financial reporting, governance, regulation, and analysis of financial statements. You also gain an understanding of the role of published financial statements in aiding users in their decision-making.

BE162-7-AU
Financial Decision Making
(20 CREDITS)

This module introduces you to management accounting and management control principles, investment appraisal and financial control principles, and market and managerial behaviours. You examine a range of issues that relate to financial and managerial decision-making, including incremental costing, budgeting, activity-based costing, capital structure and long term financing, and financial analysis of commercial projects.

BE350-7-SP
Corporate Finance
(20 CREDITS)

This module offers you a standard introduction of the field of corporate finance at postgraduate level. You consider the classical areas of Modigliani-Miller irrelevance, Taxes and capital structure, Trade-off theory and Pecking order theory of capital structure, before exploring the more modern areas, which are essentially based on contract theory.

BE351-7-SP
Derivative Securities
(20 CREDITS)

Master the pricing of financial derivatives and their use for hedging financial risks. You study the basics of futures and options, analyse the Black-Scholes and binomial option pricing models, and consider various numerical techniques for pricing financial derivatives. Futures and options are then utilised in the context of hedging financial risks, and you are introduced to the concept of volatility trading and the treatment of volatility as an asset class.

BE352-7-AU
Asset Pricing
(20 CREDITS)

Gain a formal introduction to asset pricing theories and empirical findings. You review the fundamental theories of the expected utility, asset pricing kernels, and risk-neutral valuation, covering the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), and linear factor models arising from the Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT). You also discuss empirical asset pricing studies.

BE354-7-AU
Portfolio Management
(20 CREDITS)

Understand the process of portfolio management. You cover the main concepts such as efficient diversification, managing risk exposures, and the valuation of financial assets that are at the core of managing investment portfolios, and pay special attention to the practicalities of the implementation of these concepts.

BE356-7-SP
Financial Modelling
(20 CREDITS)

Consider the use of modern econometric techniques in the analysis of financial time series. You cover multivariate models for stationary and non-stationary processes, such as Vector Autoregressive models, consider appropriate models for volatility, and study Markov processes and simulation methods used for financial modelling.

BE357-7-SP
Behavioural Finance
(20 CREDITS)

Behavioural finance rejects crucial tenets of mainstream finance such as the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) on the basis that agents are less than fully rational, and that arbitrage fails to eliminate mispricing. Instead it identifies market anomalies or regularities such as holiday effects that are at odds with the EMH. You learn to use ideas from cognitive psychology, such as overconfidence, and aspects of imperfect arbitrage to explain these.

BE361-7-SP
Risk Management
(20 CREDITS)

The recent financial crisis and credit crunch have demonstrated that risk management was too narrowly defined. In this course you examine the Value at Risk (VAR) measure of financial risk developed in the 1990s, before discussing the new post-crisis Regulatory environment.

BE362-7-SP
Fixed Income Securities
(20 CREDITS)

Discover the concepts and tools that are useful to asset managers who want to use fixed income securities for investing, market-making or speculating. You first study fixed income markets and instruments, before going on to explore basic concepts of bond portfolio management and investigating the quantitative tools used to value bonds and manage bonds' portfolios.

BE364-7-SP
Trading Global Financial Markets
(20 CREDITS)

Gain theoretical knowledge and a practical understanding of financial markets, trading strategies, risk and money management and trader analytics at the highest level. You study a mix of classroom-based instruction, case studies and practical trading exercises where you trade on real-time simulated global markets through the use of industry-strength proprietary trading software in the trading lab.

BE368-7-AU
Finance Research Techniques Using Matlab
(20 CREDITS)

This module introduces Matlab, software commonly used in financial organisations and academia to model portfolio construction and solve banking and finance challenges. You learn how to use Matlab programming language to solve financial problems. These may include finding optimal portfolio weights, calculating and simulating derivative prices and implied volatilities, and estimating and simulating GARCH models, amongst others.

BE369-7-SP
Data Analysis: Cross Sectional, Panel and Qualitative Data Methods
(20 CREDITS)

This module provides you with an understanding of non-time-series data analytic approaches in finance. It covers methods for cross-sectional, panel and qualitative analysis and their applications whereby all topics are illustrated with relevant examples. Cross-sectional data are organised over individual groups (eg households, firms or countries) and have no time dimension. They may include discontinuous data (eg binary), qualitative or categorical data and are essentially non-numerical. Examples include: survey responses, textual analysis of social media or interviews. Panel data or longitudinal data are multi-dimensional data streams involving measurements over time. As such, panel data consists of researcher's observations of numerous phenomena that were collected over several time periods for the same group of units or entities. For example, a panel data set may be one that follows a given sample of individuals over time and records observations or information on each individual in the sample. The nature and advantages of panel data has led to numerous applications in finance and economics research.

BE399-7-AU
Postgraduate Mathematics Preparation
(0 CREDITS)

This module covers topics in mathematics that are required in Masters-level finance courses at the University of Essex. You focus on the basics of linear algebra, differential calculus including optimisation and dynamics.

BE650-7-AU
Modern Banking
(20 CREDITS)

Explore the basics of the structure and environment of banking, and selected aspects of the applied economics of the modern banking firm. You study structure-conduct-performance, competition, bank efficiency, regulation, international banking and bank failures and crises.

BE651-7-SP
Bank Strategy and Risk
(20 CREDITS)

Analyse the key strategic developments in banking and the main aspects of risk management in modern banks. You are introduced to the concept of shareholder value in banking, the main banking strategies to create shareholder value, the key risks in banking, and the most important tools required to manage bank risks.

BE653-7-SP
Industry Expert Lectures in Finance
(20 CREDITS)

Taught exclusively by leading industry experts, this module offers you a unique opportunity to appreciate the latest developments and issues faced by leading practitioners in the areas of quantitative finance and risk management.

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