MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
BA History with Film Studies options

Year 2, Component 03

Film option(s) from list
HR270-5-AU
Sex, War and Class at the Movies: 1930-1960
(15 CREDITS)

You explore the relationship between cinema and society in Britain from the interwar depression, through the Second World War and the onset of affluence and mass-consumerism in the 1950s and 60s, to the rise of Thatcherism and the collapse of the 'post-war settlement'. You examine classes and cultures in relation to the lived history of the period, in order to track what they both reveal and conceal about the historical processes which transformed Britain during the 20th century.

LT205-5-SP
Creative Media
(15 CREDITS)

Get yourself out there. Digital and social media provide invaluable platforms for showcasing your creative work, creating new and innovative content, and connecting with future employers, agents, and collaborators. In this module, you investigate the potential of both existing and emerging social and multi-media channels, getting hands-on in practical sessions, and gaining key knowledge of the legal aspects of web-based media.

LT206-5-SP
Narrative and Film
(15 CREDITS)

How do films tell their story? What narrative conventions do genre films utilise? How do filmmakers adapt original literature to create new stories? Explore meanings in different film narrative using classic, modernist and postmodern examples. Understand narrative conventions in genre films. Study screen adaptation, the cinematic remake and transmedia storytelling.

LT229-5-FY
On-screen Anti-heroes
(30 CREDITS)

Why are we drawn to the onscreen antihero? Does a film like Joker represent something profound about class status or mental health, or is there something alluring about the character's explicit non-conformity to everyday behaviour? Similarly, why do we play computer games or watch television programmes that challenge societal norms through violence and criminal activity? Does new media technology contribute to the ubiquity of morally questionable characters into new everyday spaces? This module focuses upon the idea of the antihero across screen media, predominantly within film, television and computer gaming. It considers why audiences have and continue to be enticed by the darker side of entertainment and what these figures offer towards wider debates of morality and the representation of mental health onscreen.

LT250-5-AU
Dystopias
(15 CREDITS)

A utopia is an imagined social order in which human flourishing has either been perfected or realised to an exceptionally high degree. A dystopia, by contrast, is a radically dysfunctional society in which the lives of the inhabitants are significantly impaired, damaged, or otherwise undesirable. In this module, we will study nine landmarks from the history of dystopian fiction, beginning in the early twentieth century and ending in the early twenty-first. Topics and issues addressed on the module include, but are not limited to, authoritarianism, surveillance, censorship, consumerism, the culture industry, feminism, Afrofuturism, genetic engineering, cloning, artificial intelligence, and global warming.

TH211-5-PS
Global Encounters in Theatre and Film
(15 CREDITS)

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