People

Dr Patrick Lown

Research Fellow (EssexLab Manager)
Department of Government
Dr Patrick Lown
  • Email

  • Telephone

    +44 (0) 1206 873809

  • Location

    5B.312, Colchester Campus

  • Academic support hours

    N/A

Profile

Qualifications

  • BS Psychology, The Ohio State University (2010)

  • PhD Political Science, Stony Brook University (2015)

Research and professional activities

Research interests

Public Opinion of Social Welfare Politics

Economic Inequality and Social Mobility

Meritocratic Beliefs and Ideology

Empathy

Political Participation, Protest, and Social Movements

Survey and Experimental Research Methodology

Current research

Lown, Patrick L. and Reuben Kline. Holding the Party Line: Partisanship and Horse-race Perceptions in the Strategic Voting Calculus.

Feldman, Stanley, Leonie Huddy, Julie Wronski, and Patrick L. Lown. The Interplay of Empathy and Individualism in Support for Social Welfare Policies

Lown, Patrick, Simone Dietrich, and Hugh Ward. A Failure of Imagination: How cultural differences impede empathy and the flow of foreign aid.

Foreign aid does not necessarily flow to where the need is greatest. This could be because of strategic interests of donor countries or inefficiencies associated with the implementation of foreign aid in recipient countries. It may also be, in part, due to failure of the ‘moral imagination’ of the pivotal voter in donor countries: as social distance increases individuals find it harder to sympathize with others in need of foreign aid. Although citizens might recognize need, the knowledge about need may not translate into support for aid because emotions are not sufficiently stirred; and more likely to occur for people who are ideologically opposed to foreign aid. We investigate this question through macro- and micro-level analyses. In our country-level analyses of aid allocation we show that ‘social distance’ between donor and recipient countries influences levels of aid. Since this analysis cannot establish that the causal mechanism at work relates to sympathy we propose to test the individual-level implications of our theory through a survey experiment using British citizens. We find evidence for our thesis. The research contributes to our understanding of how foreign aid preferences are formed and whether they are malleable.

Popiezna, Paulina, Patrick Lown, and Simone Dietrich.“Opening Civil Society Space in Eastern Europe: Do Neighbors Matter?”

Newman, Benjamin and Patrick Lown. “Exposure to Economic Inequality and Belief in the American Dream: An Experimental Approach.”

Albertazzi, Andrea, Friederike Mengel and Patrick Lown. "The Impact of Inequality Exposure on Economic Attitudes and Behavior"

Publications

Journal articles (3)

Newman, BJ., Hartman, TK., Lown, PL. and Feldman, S., (2015). Easing the Heavy Hand: Humanitarian Concern, Empathy, and Opinion on Immigration. British Journal of Political Science. 45 (03), 583-607

Newman, BJ., Johnston, CD. and Lown, PL., (2014). False Consciousness or Class Awareness? Local Income Inequality, Personal Economic Position, and Belief in American Meritocracy. American Journal of Political Science. 59 (2), 326-340

Newman, BJ., Johnson, J. and Lown, PL., (2014). The "Daily Grind": Work, Commuting, and Their Impact on Political Participation. American Politics Research. 42 (1), 141-170

Contact

plown@essex.ac.uk
+44 (0) 1206 873809

Location:

5B.312, Colchester Campus

Academic support hours:

N/A