Department of Psychology

Our academic staff

Academic members of staff

Christopher Barry
Professor, Department of Psychology
Research interests: The cognitive psychology (and neuropsychology) of aspects of language production Lexical selection in spoken word production (eg, picture naming, reading aloud) Stroop and picture-word interference tasks Bilingual word production and language control Written and typed word production;
Kathryn Buchanan
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Improving subjective well-being through the identification of happiness-enhancing behaviours or activities; Promoting the uptake of eco-friendly behaviours; The capabilities of digital technologies to change behaviour;
Alasdair Clarke
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Geoff Cole
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Cognitive neuropsychology; Visual cognition; Comparative psychology; Colour vision;
Nicholas Cooper
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Transcranial magnetic simulation (TMS); Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS); Mirror neurons; Stress & Ageing;
Rachel Cooper
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Marcello Costantini
Reader, Department of Psychology
Research interests: The fil rouge of my research is the role of the physical and the biological body in making sense of the external world. In this I refer to the physical body as the structural and morphological features of the body while the biological body refers to the inner state of the body (e.g. the activity of the immune system). To study this topic I use different techniques such as psychophysics, eye-movements, brain stimulation (TMS), neurophysiology (EEG, MEG) and neuroimaging (fMRI-fNIRS).;
Philip Cozzolino
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Mortality awareness; Motivated social cognition; The psychology of liberty; Perceptions of, and reactions to, (in)equality and (un)fairness; The formation and maintenance of trust and helping in society;
Rael Dawtry
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Social cognition; political psychology; social comparison; relative deprivation; inequality; socioecological psychology; applied social psychology; just-world theory; immanent justice reasoning; judgment and decision making. I have a particular interest in how socioecological factors (e.g., economic structure, culture, institutions) shape political cognition, beliefs and attitudes.;
Kevin Dent
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Visual cognition; Understanding basic mechanisms of visuo-spatial attention; Visuo-spatial short-term memory; The effects of experience on object and word processing;
Madeline Eacott
Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Education) and Professor (R), Department of Psychology
Francesca Ferri
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: 001141805ITAB6194514.0 Normal0falsefalsefalseITJAX-NONE /* Style Definitions */table.MsoNormalTable{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;mso-style-noshow:yes;mso-style-priority:99;mso-style-parent:"";mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;mso-para-margin:0cm;mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;mso-pagination:widow-orphan;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:Cambria;mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} ; I am interested in how the human brain constructs our sense of self, and in the brain mechanisms that are altered in self-disorders. I start from the assumption that our sense of self relies on the processing of multisensory and motor signals from the body, which are integrated with inputs from the environment. In this view the body serves as the ground for our pre-reflexive communion with the world. Why does the body no longer serve as the medium for interactions with other people and the environment in self-disorders? What is altered in the brain mechanisms supporting multisensory and sensorimotor integration? Which is the contribution of the individuals genetic endowment to such alterations? My research investigates the neurobiological basis of the bodily self, along the continuum from normal conditions to self-disorders. It takes advantage from an interdisciplinary approach based on psychophysical, neural and genetic data.;
Maria Filippetti
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: The development of body awareness; Tactile interactions; Development of appetitive tendencies;
Tom Foulsham
Reader, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Visual cognition; Perception of pictures and videos; Eye movements; Cognitive neuropsychology;
Nicolas Geeraert
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Stress-trajectories in acculturation; Cross-cultural differences in social cognition; Social perception and social cognition;
Helge Gillmeister
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Visual body representations and effects of body image eating and body dysmorphic disorders; Somatosensory processes, multisensory processes involving somatosensation; Sensorimotor learning, neural plasticity, integration of external objects/tools into the body schema; Mirror touch, action representation, and social cognition;
Rick Hanley
Professor, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Disorders of reading, writing, memory, and face processing; Learning to read in different writing systems; Speech production; Tip-of-the-tongue states; Effects of irrelevant speech on memory;
Paul Hibbard
Head of Department - Professor, Department of Psychology
Research interests: binocular vision; image statistics; visual discomfort;
Gethin Hughes
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Sense of Agency;
Marie Juanchich
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Research interests;
Steffan Kennett
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Multisensory attention and perception; Tactile effects on visual spatial attention; Viewing the skin changing tactile judgements; Changes in body posture modifying spatial attention; Methods ERPs, EOG, TMS, Reaction time;
Veronica Lamarche
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Veronica is a relationship scientist interested in:; Trust and interdependence; Motivated cognition and relationship maintenance; Risk, vulnerability and uncertainty regulation;
Vanessa Loaiza
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: working memory; cognitive aging; long-term memory; executive functioning; conscious recollection;
Keith May
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: My work investigates the processing performed by the human visual system. My research mainly falls into the following areas: perceptual encoding, edge processing, visual grouping, visual attention, and coding efficiency. I also work on face perception and memory.;
Rick O'Gorman
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Evolutionary psychology; Pro-social behaviour; Social norms; Leadership and group functioning; Intergroup conflict; Computer modelling of social phenomenon; Applications of social cognition techniques to evolutionary questions;
Sheina Orbell
Professor, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Intention-behaviour relation; Self-regulation; Social psychology of volition and volitional strategies in behavioural change; Motivational models of health-related behaviour; Social psychology of sexual health; Social-cognitive accounts of motivation and health-related behaviour; Cervical screening; Colorectal cancer screening;
Silke Paulmann
Professor, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Social language processing in normal and special populations (eg bilinguals, brain damaged, aging); Emotional and attitudinal language processing across different cultures; Motivational prosody processing; Ambiguity resolution in first and second language users; Event-related brain potentials;
Gerulf Rieger
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: My work focuses on sexual orientation: how it is organized, how it develops, and how it affects a persons life. I use a diversity of methodologies, including self-report, behavioural observations, physiological activity and neurological correlates, and employ an array of quantitative skills in order to pursue my research. I use videos and photos from childhood to examine whether masculine and feminine behaviours during early development predict adult sexual orientation. I also investigate the social impact of these signals. I have used large data sets of family members to investigate potential evolutionary reasons for sexual orientation. In another line of research, I study the association of sexual orientation with physiological sexual arousal in order to illuminate sex differences in sexual response. With a different methodology, pupil dilation, I am currently conducting research that will aid in explaining how early sex and sexual orientation differences in sexual attraction emerge. These studies have broad relevance for understanding how people perceive themselves and others, for the consequences of these perceptions, and for the development of differences between and within the sexes.;
Silvia Rigato
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Face perception and processing in infancy I am interested in the infants ability of integrating the information coming from the eye region and the emotional expression There is growing evidence that infants, and even newborns, are expert in recognizing faces and processing their inner features They show visual preferences and different brain activation according to specific gaze-expression combinations; The development of body representation and tactile localisation As we move and act on the world, we need to continuously update the sense of our posture and the position of our limbs (&ldquobody schema&rdquo) This involves taking into account the visual and proprioceptive cues about our body, based on which a mental representation of the body is formed While working at the Goldsmiths Infantlab, I have been investigating how infants develop the ability to locate a touch on their body while taking into account their own postural changes; The development of the neural basis of shared touch When observing the experiences of others, we not only understand what they experience but often empathically share their states One set of mechanisms that contribute to this ability are neural regions where seeing the states of others triggers representations of corresponding states in our brain With colleagues from the Department of Psychology at Goldsmiths, I have recently started a project, funded by the British Academy, which investigates the development of vicarious tactile representations in infancy;
Maxwell Roberts
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Inductive and deductive reasoning; Individual differences in reasoning strategies; The cognitive psychology of intelligence; Spatial reasoning and imagery; The development of expertise;
Tracy Robinson
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: The role of emotion and anxiety in attentional biases;
Jonathan Rolison
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: A major focus of my research is risk taking behaviours across adulthood. My research in this area is aimed at explaining why people become more cautious in older age and whether age changes in risk taking behaviours are beneficial or harmful. There are both theoretical and applied aspects to my work in this field. As an applied focus, I investigate the risks faced by young and elderly drivers with a view to understanding whether drivers of these ages are a danger to themselves and to other road users. Through my applied work, I have introduced new statistical tools for the assessment of driver crash risk.; A second theme in my research explores perception and communication of health risks and health-related decision making. One of my aims in this area is to develop methods for overcoming barriers to effective risk communication. For example, my recent work has shown that maths anxiety impedes understanding of numerical health risks, but that some of the negative effects of maths anxiety can be alleviated with graphical presentation aids.;
Riccardo Russo
Professor, Department of Psychology
Gillian Sandstrom
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: My favourite stories are the ones where all the characters/storylines turn out to be connected in unforeseen ways. These stories seem more and more plausible in our increasingly connected world. Despite this, we now live in a culture of disconnection: People find it hard to make friends, and suffer emotionally and physically from a lack of belonging. My research addresses this apparent contradiction by focusing at the micro level, examining how seemingly insignificant social interactions and everyday behaviours can influence and improve well-being. I focus on three research questions:; What personal and cultural factors promote/inhibit social interactions?; When and how do social interactions lead to feelings of connection?; When and how do people benefit from feeling connected to others?;
Andrew Simpson
Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Long-term research goals:; 1) What thoughts and behaviours do children find hardest to inhibit? What cognitive properties create these difficulties?; 2) How does the development of inhibitory control interact with the development of conceptual understanding and metacognition?; 3) What gets better when inhibitory control develops during childhood?; 4) Why is the development of inhibitory control linked to the development of motor skill?; 5) How do 1-4 interact to drive the development of self control?;
Miroslav Sirota
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: In my research, I am trying to understand how people estimate, judge, reason and make decisions in situations of uncertainty and risk, how people perform these processes on their own and in the presence of the others, and how people perform these processes in the lab and in the wild.; My basic research interests include perceptions of verbal probabilities, statistical reasoning, and intuitive and deliberative processing. My applied research interests include uncertainty and risk communication (e.g., climate change communication, communication between patients and doctors), and diagnostic and management decision-making of doctors.;
Gijsbert Stoet
Professor, Department of Psychology
Gijsbert Stoet
Professor, Department of Psychology
Elia Valentini
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: My research investigates how people perceive negative valence information, how they interpret both physical and psychological events as threatening.; Some keywords in my projects are therefore threat, pain, anxiety, emotion, attention. Current projects would involve measuring electroencephalography and other psychophysiological measures, subjective reports (i.e. from sensory ratings to personality questionnaires), cognitive and behavioural performance in a multisensory setting .; This interest led to the development of experimental questions adressing topics that span from basic processing of sensory stimuli to the complex interaction between cognition emotion and body representation in the brain.;
Loes Van Dam
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: My main research areas are visual perception, visuomotor performance and multi-sensory perception and action. In other words, I am interested in how the human brain transforms the sensory information it receives into adequate perceptual interpretations and goal-oriented behavior. I use psychophysical and behavioral methods in addition to ideal-observer modelling to investigate these topics.;
Geoffrey Ward
Professor, Department of Psychology
Research interests: Similarities and differences between different memory tasks, especially immediate serial recall and free recall; General properties of episodic memory; Memory structures and processes; The use of technology to enhance human memory;
Tuesday Watts
Lecturer, Department of Psychology
Research interests: The development and expression of sexual orientation and gender nonconformity; How the social environment responds to gender nonconformity during childhood; How the experience of stigmatization because of gender nonconformity during childhood affects wellbeing in adulthood; Identifying protective factors that buffer against the harmful effects of experienced stigmatization because of gender nonconformity;
Konstantina Zougkou
Lecturer, Department of Psychology