Undergraduate Course

BA Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)

(Including Foundation Year)

Now In Clearing
BA Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)

Overview

The details
Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) (Including Foundation Year)
QX41
October 2018
Full-time
4 years
Colchester Campus
Essex Pathways

Our BA English Language and Teaching English as a Foreign Language (including foundation year) is open to Home and EU students. It will be suitable for you if your academic qualifications do not yet meet our entrance requirements for the three-year version of this course and you want a programme that increases your subject knowledge as well as improves your academic skills.

This four-year course includes a foundation year (Year Zero), followed by a further three years of study. During your Year Zero, you study four academic subjects relevant to your chosen course as well as a compulsory academic skills module.

You are an Essex student from day one, a member of our global community based at the most internationally diverse campus university in the UK.

After successful completion of Year Zero in our Essex Pathways Department, you progress to complete your course with the Department of Language and Linguistics. This course is ideal if you want to teach English to non-native speakers, but the knowledge and skills you develop will also prepare you for a range of other possible careers in the media, in administration, in business and in education; in fact, any job where the ability to apply critical thinking to problems, to conduct independent research and to communicate the results of your work to others are required.

You study a range of topics that give you a thorough grounding in English language, teaching methodologies as well as practical training in TEFL. You study topics including:

  • Second language learning
  • Foundations of TEFL
  • Language in Society
  • Practical training in TEFL methods linguistics and sociolinguistics
  • The structure of the English language

In each year it is possible to take a modern foreign language option, if you wish, instead of an English language option.

In your second year, you take three practical TEFL modules where you learn about teaching methodology, receive guided preparation sessions, and engage in teaching practice. Taken together, these modules are worth 60 credits and provide the content required for a TEFL-initiate qualification. On successful completion, you're awarded a stand-alone certificate in TEFL which will help you start your teaching career.

We are a leading UK university for language and linguistics research (REF 2014), a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Why we're great.
  • In your second year, you take teaching practice modules. On successful completion, these give you practical experience and a TEFL-initiate qualification recognised by the British Council.
  • You're taught by lecturers who are internationally recognised for their research.
  • Tailor your degree to suit your interests and career goals thanks to our wide range of optional modules.

Our expert staff

We have some of the best teachers across the University in our Essex Pathways Department, all of whom have strong subject backgrounds and are highly skilled in their areas.

Our staff are internationally renowned. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios, and we integrate language learning with linguistics wherever there is synergy. Our hands-on approach enhances your experience in the department.

In theoretical linguistics, Louisa Sadler and Kyle Jerro work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages. Nancy Kula and Yuni Kim investigate how complex words are created and also analyse the sounds of a number of languages.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer, Vineeta Chand and Ella Jeffries all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate the factors that cause such variation such as gender, age, or social class. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin and Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Christina Gkonou, Tracey Costley and Neophytos Mitsigkas focus on issues to do with the teaching and learning of English as a Second, Foreign and an Additional Language.

In psycholinguistics, Claire delle Luche and Laurie Lawyer use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by disorders.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our Essex Pathways Department for your foundation year, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer, as well as those provided by our department to support you:

  • We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
  • Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
  • Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

In our Department of Language and Linguistics you also have access to:

  • Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
  • Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
  • Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
  • Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
  • An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
  • Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives
  • Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost

Your future

Studying language and linguistics allows you to develop your research and IT skills by collecting and analysing linguistic data using state-of-the-art technology, and a combination of team-work and independent projects enhances your communication, problem-solving, and management skills.

Graduates of our department have gone on to have careers in a wide variety of fields, including teaching (in the UK and abroad), journalism, branding, advertising, marketing, travel, communications, publishing, speech and occupational therapy, interpreting, translating and media.

For example, one of our department’s recent graduates is now an Assistant Editor at Scholastic, whilst another teaches English in South Korea. Other graduates have gone on to work for a wide range of high-profile companies including:

  • The British Council
  • English in Action
  • Cambridge University Press
  • Macmillan Publishers
  • Cambridge University Press
  • Decisive Media Ltd

We also work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Entry requirements

Clearing entry requirements

If you have already received your results, use our Clearing application form to apply for 2018 entry through Clearing. You will be asked to provide details of your qualifications and grades.

English language requirements

English language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English: IELTS 5.5 overall. Specified component grades are also required for applicants who require a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK.

Other English language qualifications may be acceptable so please contact us for further details. If we accept the English component of an international qualification then it will be included in the information given about the academic levels required. Please note that date restrictions may apply to some English language qualifications

If you are an international student requiring a Tier 4 visa to study in the UK please see our immigration webpages for the latest Home Office guidance on English language qualifications.

If you do not meet our IELTS requirements then you may be able to complete a pre-sessional English pathway that enables you to start your course without retaking IELTS.

Additional Notes

Our Year 0 courses are only open to UK and EU applicants. If you’re an international student, but do not meet the English language or academic requirements for direct admission to your chosen degree, you could prepare and gain entry through a pathway course. Find out more about opportunities available to you at the University of Essex International College.

Structure

Example structure

We offer a flexible course structure with a mixture of compulsory and optional modules chosen from lists. Below is just one example structure from the current academic year of a combination of modules you could take. Your course structure could differ based on the modules you choose.

Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore all modules listed are subject to change. To view the compulsory modules and full list of optional modules currently on offer, please view the programme specification via the link below.

Introduction to Linguistics

This module is designed to prepare students wishing to join a degree course in the Department of Language and Linguistics. It is also a suitable choice for students who simply have an interest in language and it similarly provides a sound academic background for the study of subjects which rely extensively on proficient use of the English language such as Literature, History, Sociology, and Philosophy.

View Introduction to Linguistics on our Module Directory

The United Kingdom from 1900 to the Present Day (optional)

Britain has experienced unprecedented changes in the last 100 years. What has brought about these changes and how have they affected the Britain of today? This course will outline political, economic, social and cultural change in the UK during the Twentieth Century and beyond and offer an insight into Britain’s place in the modern world.

View The United Kingdom from 1900 to the Present Day (optional) on our Module Directory

Major Writers in English Literature (optional)

Want to study Hamlet? And contemporary works by Angela Carter or Kazuo Ishiguru? Interested in World War One poetry? Study a range of drama, poetry and prose fiction. Describe, analyse and reflect on key texts from Shakespeare to the present day. Become familiar with the crucial terms for assessing literature.

View Major Writers in English Literature (optional) on our Module Directory

Sounds

This module introduces you to the production of language sounds and their distribution in words, in particular, but not exclusively, in English. You will study the basic principles of phonology and develop the knowledge required to understand and begin to analyse sound systems. You will also discuss phonological processes and investigate the context and motivation of occurrence.

View Sounds on our Module Directory

Understanding Data in Linguistics

Develop three important skills for your future studies in this mixture of lecture and lab sessions: Tools of the trade – brush up on your ICT skills; Presentational skills – get to grips with talking in front of an audience as well as presenting written ideas; Analytical skills – refine your analytical skills for academic and non-academic work. By the time you’ve completed this module, you will be equipped with a skill set will see you through your studies and beyond.

View Understanding Data in Linguistics on our Module Directory

Language in Society

Discover the role of variation in language systems, and learn the techniques and concepts needed to study the way language varies. You will look at geographical, social and historical dialects, explore language myths, and cover topics such as measuring language variation, social patterns and functions of language variation, speaker variables, and the relationship of language variation to language change. At the end of this module, you will have gained a clear understanding of the role variation plays in language systems, and will be able to look critically at the social functions and values of dialects and vernacular language usage.

View Language in Society on our Module Directory

Foundations of Teaching English as a Foreign Language I

Do you dream of a career that could take you around the world? This module will introduce you to the fundamentals of English Language Teaching, showing how the theory of linguistics, pedagogy and psychology all shape classroom practice. You will look at the variety, purpose, content and contexts of ELT, focussing on the classroom, the language, and the different participants in the learning process, and will cover everything from the role of the teacher to classroom management.

View Foundations of Teaching English as a Foreign Language I on our Module Directory

Foundations of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (II)

Build on your knowledge acquired in LG117 in this complementary module, which will introduce you to the fundamentals of contemporary language teaching practice. Discover how classroom practice is shaped by background theory, covering aspects of linguistics, pedagogy and psychology. By the end of this module, you will be familiar with some of the main issues relating to TEFL, know more about the factors which influence second language learning and how they can inform teaching practice, and become familiar with some of the varied outlooks to teaching vocabulary, grammar, comprehension and communication skills.

View Foundations of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (II) on our Module Directory

Words and Sentences

Discover how to describe and analyse the structure of words, phrases, and sentences in this introductory half module. With topics including the English parts of speech, word structure and the distinction between inflection, derivation and compounding, and the identification of phrases, you will gain a solid grasp of the foundational material for the study of English linguistics, whilst developing useful analytical skills.

View Words and Sentences on our Module Directory

Child Language Development (optional)

Gain a thorough overview of key concepts, methods, and theoretical approaches in research on language development throughout the lifespan. Investigate monolingual and bilingual child language acquisition, second language acquisition, language loss, and the attrition of the first language in second language learners, by looking at a broad range of studies, including ongoing studies from the Centre for Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), at the University of Essex.

View Child Language Development (optional) on our Module Directory

Adult Language Development and Processing (optional)

How are words organised in our brain? How do we understand sentences? What is the relationship between language, music, and the brain? Find the answers to these questions by taking a critical look at findings from a broad range of studies, whilst learning about key concepts, methods, and theoretical approaches in research on language processing.

View Adult Language Development and Processing (optional) on our Module Directory

Careers and Employability Skills for Languages and Linguistics

What are your skills? And how do they fit in with your career plans? Build your employability skills through this non-credit bearing but obligatory module. Attend workshops and events, engage in activities to raise your employability and build your knowledge of the graduate job market.

View Careers and Employability Skills for Languages and Linguistics on our Module Directory

Analysing the structure of English

Build on analytical concepts introduced in your first year, and investigate a range of key grammatical constructions in English. With an emphasis on description, rather than a particular theoretical approach, this practically orientated module will provide you with a solid foundation for tackling more theoretical options in English linguistics. As well as gaining an understanding of key areas of English grammar and grammatical terminology, you will also equip yourself with analytical, data, and evaluation skills.

View Analysing the structure of English on our Module Directory

Semantics and Pragmatics

What is 'meaning' as it relates to words and sentences? How is the meaning of a sentence affected by the context it is produced in? These are the fundamental issues you will address in this module. You will examine the relationship between what is said and what is meant, with the first part of the course looking at basic issues in Semantics. The second part of the course will examine the distinction between a speaker's words and what a speaker means by those words – the domain of pragmatics.

View Semantics and Pragmatics on our Module Directory

Initial Teaching Practice

Put teaching theory into practice by planning and delivering a range of grammar, vocabulary and skills development lessons. Starting with a fully guided session and culminating in an independently planned lesson, the support from your tutor lessens each week as you develop your ability to prepare and plan your teaching.

View Initial Teaching Practice on our Module Directory

Theory and Practice in English Language Teaching

This module explores significant methodological aspects of English language teaching from a theoretical perspective. You will understand how to apply the theory to practice through your lesson plans.

View Theory and Practice in English Language Teaching on our Module Directory

Phonology

Continuing from LG110, you will build on your existing knowledge, reinforcing the cognitive aspect of spoken language, the way in which sounds combine to make up words, and the interaction between word formation and phonology, as well as phonology in the wider context of phrases. The theory you learn throughout this module can be used to analyse other languages.

View Phonology on our Module Directory

Research methods for language and linguistics

Discover the steps involved in undertaking a research project in language and linguistics and develop your own final-year project. Topics include: Reviewing literature; Formulating research questions and hypotheses; Choosing a suitable research design; Data collection; Analysis techniques; Reporting findings. You will learn through a mixture of lectures, seminars and lab sessions to build your knowledge, skills, and confidence in researching, structuring, and writing a research project.

View Research methods for language and linguistics on our Module Directory

Careers and Employability Skills for Languages and Linguistics

What are your skills? And how do they fit in with your career plans? Build your employability skills through this non-credit bearing but obligatory module. Attend workshops and events, engage in activities to raise your employability and build your knowledge of the graduate job market.

View Careers and Employability Skills for Languages and Linguistics on our Module Directory

Careers and Employability Skills for Languages and Linguistics

What are your skills? And how do they fit in with your career plans? Build your employability skills through this non-credit bearing but obligatory module. Attend workshops and events, engage in activities to raise your employability and build your knowledge of the graduate job market.

View Careers and Employability Skills for Languages and Linguistics on our Module Directory

Project: Linguistics

What fascinates you about linguistics? Work independently on an extended project of your choosing within linguistics, with supervision from our expert staff. Build your subject knowledge, as well as your research skills and project management abilities.

View Project: Linguistics on our Module Directory

Translation, Interpreting and Subtitling Skills (optional)

The aim of this module is to provide you with comprehensive practical experience of translating different kinds of texts both from the source language into English and from English into a target language. You will look at a range of texts from news and business correspondence, to manuals, advertising and newspaper clips and develop your ability to reflect on context, purpose, target audience and style, analysing and discussing different alternatives, all relevant for making good choices on translation. It will also introduce you to interpreting and subtitling skills.

View Translation, Interpreting and Subtitling Skills (optional) on our Module Directory

First Language Acquisition (optional)

Wish to run experiments on child-language acquisition? Examine research on children’s acquisition of English. Understand and critically evaluate the data analysis techniques available. Develop and present your own arguments in a variety of formats, building your knowledge and professional skills for future research.

View First Language Acquisition (optional) on our Module Directory

Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional)

Why should we use computers in the language classroom? When is their use appropriate? And how do you best use them? Study computer-assisted language learning (CALL), so that you understand the arguments for and against. Create CALL tasks using available tools and become familiar with a range of CALL resources.

View Computer Assisted Language Learning (optional) on our Module Directory

Conversation and Social Interaction (optional)

How do we bring off the everyday miracle of having a conversation? This introduction to Conversation Analysis (CA) will examine the mechanics of interaction, showing us with how verbal and non-verbal actions are coordinated in time.

View Conversation and Social Interaction (optional) on our Module Directory

Teaching

  • Teaching is arranged to allow freedom in how you organise your learning experience
  • Examples of practical work include digitally recording dialect speakers in a small traditional fishing community, or scouring digitised child language databanks
  • Other teaching methods include lectures, demonstrations and learning by teaching others

Assessment

  • You’re assessed through a combination of coursework (assignments, essays and tests) and end-of-year examinations.
  • Weighted 50% coursework and 50% exams depending on which modules you choose.
  • Other assessment methods include quizzes, presentations, portfolios, group work, and projects.

Fees and funding

Home/EU fee

£9,250

International fee

TBC

Fees will increase for each academic year of study.

Home and EU fee information

International fee information

What's next

Open Days

Our events are a great way to find out more about studying at Essex. We run a number of Open Days throughout the year which enable you to discover what our campus has to offer. You have the chance to:

  • tour our campus and accommodation
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Check out our Visit Us pages to find out more information about booking onto one of our events. And if the dates aren’t suitable for you, feel free to book a campus tour here.

2018 Open Days (Colchester Campus)

  • Saturday, September 15, 2018
  • Saturday, October 27, 2018

How to apply during Clearing

Once you’ve checked that we have the right course for you, applying couldn’t be simpler. Fill in our quick and easy Clearing application form with as much detail as you can. We’ll then take a look and get back to you with a decision. There’s no need to call us to apply; just do it all online.

Find out more about Clearing

Interviews

We don’t interview all applicants during Clearing, however, we will only make offers for the following course after a successful interview:

  • BA Multimedia Journalism
  • BSc Nursing (Adult)
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The interview allows our academics to find out more about you, and in turn you’ll be able to ask us any questions you might have. Further details will be emailed to you if you are shortlisted for interview.


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