Component

MA Public Opinion and Political Behaviour
PhD Sociology options

Year 1, Component 01

Assessed modules - year 1
SC504-7-AU
Introduction to Quantitative Analysis
(20 CREDITS)

How do you critically analyse quantitative data? What are the appropriate statistical techniques for your research questions? And how do you interpret your results? Learn to conduct investigations relevant to your own research, as well as be a critical user of other research.

SC507-7-SP
Consumption, political economy and sustainability
(20 CREDITS)

Does shopping change the world? Can you make a difference by choosing more sustainable options as a consumer? These are key questions that you will be able to answer after completing this module. Examine the systems through which many of the everyday goods you enjoy are produced, circulated and consumed, explore how commodities are provisioned within a global society, and consider the possibilities and complexities of transitioning towards a more sustainable market.

SC508-7-SP
Digital Economy
(20 CREDITS)

Do hackers have ethics? Who owns digital media? Is surveillance justified? Explore the history of the digital media economy, looking at hacking, digital media piracy and peer-to-peer networks. Build your understanding of the social, economic and cultural role that digital media now plays in developed Western societies.

SC519-7-AU
Advertising: Commerce and Creativity
(20 CREDITS)

How has advertising tried to understand the consumer? What challenges are posed by international advertising? Or by the arrival of new media and alternative delivery systems? Explore the history of advertising in Britain and North America, then learn how to analyse and theorise about advertising and the wider creative industries.

SC520-7-SP
Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis
(20 CREDITS)

What are the different approaches to qualitative data analysis? And when should qualitative interviews be used? Learn about the qualitative research process, including design, selection of interview subjects and analysis, so that you are equipped to tackle your own qualitative research in the future.

SC551-7-SP
Dynamics of Gender, Work and Home
(20 CREDITS)

How are work and home life organised differently across the globe? Does gender add to this? Can we challenge our traditional understandings of work and home? As work helps to define your identity, explore the nature of both formal and informal work, using case studies from around the world.

SC555-7-AU
Formative Debates in Criminology
(20 CREDITS)

How do we challenge our conventional understanding of crime? And what can we do about this? Examine the history of criminology and learn about the contemporary debates. Study topics like criminalisation, social deviance, and surveillance and punishment. Look ahead with analysis of new work by leading authors in the field.

SC559-7-SP
Emotions and Society
(20 CREDITS)

Emotions – a topic once pursued by relatively few psychologists and natural scientists – are now one of the most researched fields across disciplines. Emotion studies in the social sciences can be traced back to Max Weber and Norbert Elias, but the field has grown rapidly in the last three decades. This module aims to introduce the field of emotion studies in the social sciences, and to offer graduates conceptual and methodological tool kits for investigating emotions in their own research. It presents some of the major sub-disciplines, namely social constructionism, psycho-social approach, affect theory, and neuro-sociology. First, we will present the difficulties in defining the subject, i.e., the main debates over what emotions are and how to define them. We will then focus on psycho-social approaches to emotions, while the last five sessions will be devoted to sociological, anthropological and historical studies in specific emotions, including love and loss, fear and trauma.

SC560-7-AU
Crime, Politics and the Sex Industry
(20 CREDITS)

What kind of knowledge is and has been produced around prostitution and sex work? How does gender intersect with racial, classed, and ethnic inequalities to shape the organisation of the sex industry? In this module, you’ll explore how sex for sale has been conceptualised in different theoretical traditions, how it has been addressed and responded to at the societal, political and policy level, and how the phenomenon and those involved in it (sellers, buyers, and third parties) have changed over time.

SC561-7-SP
Global Security Challenges
(20 CREDITS)

This module will critically assess current research, policies and practices related to current global security challenges, including those relating to human rights, climate change, migration, health, and the cybersphere

SC655-7-SP
Current Controversies in Criminology
(20 CREDITS)

How do we understand crime in our increasingly globalised world? And what about forms of control and criminal justice policy? Critically examine criminological thought on globalisation, migration, policy convergence, punishment, and crimes against the state.

SC800-7-FY
PhD Colloquium 1: Defining Your Research
(0 CREDITS)

Topics covered: general info on PhD process; writing successful research proposals and effectively preparing literature surveys; networking strategies (conference participation, summer schools, membership in research networks, etc--things that will help students to strengthen their CVs over time); preparing for fieldwork and data collection, and locating secondary data. In addition, students are introduced to a range of theoretical paradigms and their empirical applications, as represented in the Department (through presentations by academic staff). Students are expected to present their research proposals for comments by the colloquium tutor and also by others in class.

SC803-7-FY
PhD Colloquium 2: Conducting and Communicating Your Research
(0 CREDITS)

Students commit themselves from the beginning of the year to present at a conference of their choice (beyond departmental venues) and work on the conference paper throughout the colloquium, including practice presentations and discussant roles for each other's papers before the actual event. The colloquium also includes sessions on "research data management" and discussions of issues arising from students' ongoing fieldwork and data collection, and locating.

SC804-7-FY
PhD Colloquium 3: Disseminating Your Research
(0 CREDITS)

Students commit themselves from the beginning of the year to write a paper to be submitted to a journal and work on writing the journal paper throughout the colloquium, including discussion of drafts in class, and students acting as manuscript reviewers for each other’s papers. The colloquium also includes sessions on forms and process of publishing (preparing book manuscripts and revising and resubmitting journal articles); post-doctoral funding sources and obtaining research grants, using ESRC /BA (or other relevant) templates as example; searching and preparing for academic jobs, job market talks, and interviews.

SC901-7-SP
Topics in Contemporary Social Theory
(20 CREDITS)

What is the significance of 'the de-centring of the subject'? What problems does the materiality of the body pose for sociology? Do claims for objectivity now make any sense at all? Gain an understanding of the significant debates in contemporary social theory, while learning to think analytically about theoretical questions.

SC905-7-AP
Sociological Research Design
(20 CREDITS)

How do you design social research for projects? Examine the research process, from forming initial research questions through to writing up your findings. Develop your own research ideas via the approaches discussed, building a critical perspective on empirical research that will help you with future research goals.

SC905-7-AU
Sociological Research Design
(20 CREDITS)

How do you design social research for projects? Examine the research process, from forming initial research questions through to writing up your findings. Develop your own research ideas via the approaches discussed, building a critical perspective on empirical research that will help you with future research goals.

SC920-7-SP
Colonialism, Cultural Diversity and Human Rights
(20 CREDITS)

How has colonialism created human rights problems, now and in the past? And what part did mandates for free markets, industrialism and state sovereignty play? Study thinkers like Cesaire, Fanon, Arendt, Agamben and Taussig. Discuss specific international situations like Palestine, forced removal of Aboriginal children and the war on terror.

SC968-7-SP
Advanced Quantitative Analysis: Models for Cause and Effect
(20 CREDITS)

How do you interpret studies using panel data? What are the various approaches to panel data analysis? And can you analyse the same data using different methods? Gain the knowledge and confidence to manipulate panel data sets, while developing practical skills in selecting and conducting panel data analysis.

SC970-7-AU
Introduction to Survey Design and Management
(20 CREDITS)

What are the principles of modern survey design? And what is best practice? Explore the fundamentals of survey design and the concept of survey error. Analyse different types of design and modes of data collection, drawing on real-life examples. Build the transferable study skills required to conduct professional surveys. As part of this module, you're required to undertake a 10-day work placement. If you're placement is in London, your travel costs will be paid for by the company. Outside of London, you may incur associated travel costs.

SC971-7-AU
Survey Sampling, Non-Response and Inference
(20 CREDITS)

How do you deal with sampling error? What problems arise from non-response errors? And can you reduce such errors? Examine methods for mitigating non-responses errors and understand the key issues in managing data and survey processes, while gaining practical experience of designing samples.

SC974-7-SP
Survey Measurement and Question Design
(20 CREDITS)

Wish to design questionnaires? Build your theoretical knowledge and the practical tools to develop and write survey questions, and to construct questionnaires. Apply your understanding to the development of your questionnaire and implementation materials. Receive feedback on your questionnaire design.

SC982-7-AU
Migration: Theory, Concepts and Selected Issues
(20 CREDITS)

Throughout the module, we will discuss international theories of migration and social integration, examine migration and refugee policies in a comparative perspective, the difference between statistical and taste-based discrimination, and the perpetuation of bias, how we gain an understanding of labour market integration; and the debates surrounding migration, prostitution and sex work.

SC985-7-SP
The Context of Integration: Origin, Destination and the Children of Immigrants
(20 CREDITS)

How do we understand the divergent pathways of immigrants and their children in school, work, social and political life? Why do some immigrant groups and their offspring appear to fare better than others? This module will address these questions with a comparative focus on the United States and Western Europe, drawing on the concepts of (segmented) assimilation and acculturation central to the sociology of migration.

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