Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook
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Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook

How to document and respond to potential violations of the right to life within the international system for the protection of human rights

By Kate Thompson and Camille Giffard

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What is the Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook?

The Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook is a reference guide for anyone who wishes to know how to take action in response to allegations of suspicious deaths. It explains, simply and clearly, how the process of reporting and submitting complaints to international bodies and mechanisms actually works; how to make the most of it: how you might go about documenting allegations, what you can do with the information once it has been collected, how to choose between the various mechanisms according to your particular objectives, and how to present your information in a way which makes it most likely that you will obtain a response.

Who is the Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook for?

The Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook is for anyone who comes across information indicating that a suspicious death has occurred. It is particularly relevant to human rights field workers and non-governmental organisations, but could be used by doctors, lawyers, or any other professionals or individuals who might receive such information. It is not a technical manual and you do not need any special knowledge in order to use it.

Why should you consider using the Reporting Killings as Human Rights Violations Handbook?

Information is the key. International bodies and mechanisms have been created to address the problem of suspicious deaths, but their effectiveness depends on the information which is sent to them. A lot of the information received is wasted because it is sent to the wrong body, presented in an inappropriate way, or seems unreliable. Careful preparation of your information following the guidelines in the Handbook should make it possible to avoid such mistakes and more likely that you will achieve your objectives in submitting the information.

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