Doctoral training centres

Eastern ARC

Compass pointing east

Overview

Eastern Academic Research Consortium Studentships for 2015

Essex is part of Eastern Academic Research Consortium (Eastern ARC), which is a collaboration between the Universities of Essex, East Anglia and Kent. The Eastern ARC stimulates cross-institutional, collaborative research across a number of interdisciplinary areas.

The current focus of the Eastern ARC is around collaborative research in on three broad interdisciplinary areas:

  • digital humanities
  • quantitative social sciences
  • synthetic biology

Each of the three Eastern Arc universities will be offering PhD scholarships in these areas for 2015 entry. Essex is offering six PhD studentships - two studentships in each of the three interdisciplinary areas. Successful candidates will work with academics at Essex whilst also having the opportunity to network with academics and postgraduate researchers from across the three research-intensive universities.

These fully funded PhD studentships offer equivalent funding to a RCUK studentship (i.e. tuition fees at the Home/EU rate), a maintenance grant (£13,863 for the 2014/15 academic year) and a research training support grant. The deadline for PhD applications for candidates wishing to be considered for Eastern Arc funding is 28 February 2015. Further information, including details of how to apply, can be found on the tabs below.

Applicants should apply for a place at Essex and use the studentship application form. (.doc)

All three members of the Eastern ARC have significant excellence in this area.

  • At Essex we have a long and successful tradition in quantitative social science and are home to the UK Data Archive
  • Kent is one of the few institutions that have recently been awarded the Q-step initiative in enhancing quantitative teaching in social sciences
  • UEA's social science research covers a wide range of disciplines

This project is co-led by Dr Federica Genovese and Professor Kristian Skrede Gleditsch.

As an Eastern ARC doctoral student you will work closely with academics and fellow students at each of the three institutions in the Consortium.

Applications are invited, associated with the following topics, for the two studentships to be awarded.

The dynamics of income inequality in age cohorts (supervised by Crossley)

We encourage applications from candidates that intend to conduct research on the development of inequality within birth cohorts as they age. These could include: assessing the roles of heterogeneity within the cohorts that is revealed by labour market experience versus genuine uncertainty that is resolved over time; investigating the importance of savings behaviour, the housing market, and bequests and transfers in generating inequality as a cohort ages.

Candidates should submit a research proposal, clearly indicating its relationship to the socio-economics of inequality and age groups as well as the expected academic contributions. We welcome applications from candidates with broader interests in applied socio-economic research, but are particularly interested in more general projects with broad theoretical and empirical scope rather than highly case-specific proposals.

International migration and conflict (supervised by Gizelis and Gleditsch)

We encourage applications based on research projects that examine issues related to migration and conflict, including for example how refugees may exacerbate the risk of conflict, conflict over the implications of refugees or migration, or challenges for post-conflict peacebuilding related to refugees and migration.

Candidates should submit a research proposal, clearly indicating its relationship to migration and conflict as well as the expected academic contributions. We welcome applications from candidates with broader interests in conflict research and population movement, but are particularly interested in more general projects with broad theoretical and empirical scope rather than highly case-specific proposals.

The University of Kent will lead in developing collaboration within digital humanities. The three universities of the Eastern ARC have significant expertise in big data and digital heritage, particularly visualisation, geographical information systems and online curation. Led by Kent's Associate Dean of Research and Innovation (Humanities), Professor Paul Allain with Professor Robert Liddiard from the University of East Anglia and Professor Edward Higgs from the University of Essex, this collaboration will place Digital Humanities at the very heart of the Eastern ARC.

As an Eastern ARC doctoral student you will work closely with academics and fellow students at each of the three institutions in the Consortium.

Applications are invited, associated with the following topics, for the two studentships to be awarded:

Virtual modelling of human perception and movement in relationship to art and architecture

Working in the Department of Art History on research into the production of virtual models of built environments (primarily exhibition spaces) in order to study issues of spectatorship, above all, changes in visual perception based on bodily movement. The practical application of such techniques to the design of exhibition spaces.

Web searching for the frequency of the use of artistic metaphor beyond the canonical arts

Working in the Department of Art History on research into the development and use of web searching to identify the impact of artistic metaphor beyond what is normally considered as The Arts. Exploring the relationship between the canonical arts and the wider sphere of culture and communications.

The interface between traditional archives/digital humanities - preservation and access

Working in the Department of History on research into the digitisation of traditional archival material, both for the purposes of preservation and access. The development of theoretical and technological applications which can be applied to specific case studies.

The analysis of large datasets in historical research

Working in the Department of History on historical research based on datasets held in the UK Data Archive at Essex, both in terms of addressing historiographical and technical issues of research. An emphasis on nineteenth-century census datasets would be especially welcome.

This fast-moving field combines advances in biological understanding with engineering principles to design and construct new biological devices or systems for a range of uses - from new materials and biofuels to medical treatments. Advances within the field are happening at increasing speed and with lower costs than ever before.

This area is led by UEA's Head of Biological Sciences, Professor Tamas Dalmay, with Professor Christine Raines from Essex and Professor Mark Smales from Kent.

As an Eastern ARC doctoral student you will work closely with academics and fellow students at each of the three institutions in the Consortium.

More details about funding and the application, recruitment and selection process will be available shortly.

Find out more